Climate Change

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

US Navy ships from WWII provide new climate evidence

Researchers have recovered the logbooks from US Navy ships stationed at Pearl Harbour, providing new evidence for understanding how the global climate is changing.

Extreme cooling caused extinction of early humans in Europe

Study led by the University College London (UCL) suggests that an extreme cooling period approximately 1.1 million years ago likely contributed to the extinction of early human populations in Europe.

Chimú Culture constructed 10 km wall to protect capital against El Niño events

Archaeologists conducting a study of the Muralla La Cumbre, a 10 km wall in northern Peru, have concluded that the Chimú Culture constructed the wall to protect the capital of Chan Chan against El Niño events.

Arid regions of South Africa were once home to ancient lakes

Recently discovered evidence supporting the existence of ancient lakes in remarkably dry areas of South Africa indicates that Stone Age humans may have inhabited a more extensive range across the continent than initially believed.

Well-preserved fossils could be consequence of past global climate change

Climate change can affect life on Earth. According to new research, it can also affect the dead.

Heritage sites in Africa threatened by climate change

Heritage of Outstanding and Universal Value located along the African coast is at risk from climate change.

Research reveals ancient Maya lessons on surviving drought

A new study casts doubt on drought as the driver of ancient Mayan civilisation collapse.

Lost world gives glimpse of planet before last Ice Age

A lost world in Mexico has offered scientists a glimpse of the planet before the last Ice Age.

Researchers determine what caused the Liangzhu Culture collapse

The Liangzhu Culture, referred to as "China's Venice of the Stone Age" was the last Neolithic jade culture in the Yangtze River Delta of China.

“Volcanic winter” likely contributed to ecological catastrophe 250 million years ago

A team of scientists has identified an additional force that likely contributed to a mass extinction event 250 million years ago.

By 2500 earth could be alien to humans

To fully grasp and plan for climate impacts under any scenario, researchers and policymakers must look well beyond the 2100 benchmark.

Prehistoric climate change repeatedly channelled human migrations across Arabia

New research shows that over the last 400,000 years, multiple pulses of increased rainfall transformed the generally arid Arabian Peninsula into a hospitable route for human population movements across Southwest Asia.

Using archaeology to better understand climate change

Throughout history, people of different cultures and stages of evolution have found ways to adapt, with varying success, to the gradual warming of the environment they live in. But can the past inform the future, now that climate change is happening faster than ever before?

Global climate dynamics drove the decline of mastodonts and elephants

Elephants and their forebears were pushed into wipeout by waves of extreme global environmental change, rather than overhunting by early humans, according to new research.

Fecal records show Maya population affected by climate change

A McGill-led study has shown that the size of the Maya population in the lowland city of Itzan (in present-day Guatemala) varied over time in response to climate change.

Climate conditions during the migration of Homo sapiens out of Africa reconstructed

An international research team led by Professor Dr Frank Schäbitz has published a climate reconstruction of the last 200,000 years for Ethiopia.

Newly discovered African ‘climate seesaw’ drove human evolution

While it is widely accepted that climate change drove the evolution of our species in Africa, the exact character of that climate change and its impacts are not well understood.

Biodiversity devastation: Human-driven decline requires millions of years of recovery

A new study shows that the current rate of biodiversity decline in freshwater ecosystems outcompetes that at the end-Cretaceous extinction that killed the dinosaurs: damage now being done in decades to centuries may take millions of years to undo.

The ‘Great Dying’

The Paleozoic era culminated 251.9 million years ago in the most severe mass extinction recorded in the geologic record.

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