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Dying Stars Breathe Life into Earth

As dying stars take their final few breaths of life, they gently sprinkle their ashes into the cosmos through the magnificent planetary nebulae.

Norman Conquest of 1066 Did Little to Change People’s Eating Habits

Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England.

Tanis – The Ancient Egyptian Capital

Tanis is an archaeological site and ancient Egyptian city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile River delta near the modern-day town of Ṣān al-Ḥajar al-Qibliyyah.

Nan Madol – Capital of the Saudeleur Dynasty

Nan Madol is an archaeological site and former capital of the Saudeleur Dynasty, located on Temwen Island off the shores of the island of Pohnpei, in the modern-day Federated States of Micronesia.

Deadman’s Island

Located in the Medway estuary near the Isle of Sheppey in Kent, England lies Deadman’s Island, a small uninspiring stretch of land that contains a dark secret.  

Typhoon Changed Earthquake Patterns

The Earth's crust is under constant stress. Every now and then this stress is discharged in heavy earthquakes, mostly caused by the slow movement of Earth's crustal plates.

First Evidence of Snake-Like Venom Glands Found in Amphibians

Caecilians are limbless amphibians that, to the untrained eye, can be easily mistaken for snakes.

Pyramids of the Kingdom of Kush

The Kingdom of Kush was an ancient African kingdom located in Nubia, a region along the Nile rivers encompassing the areas between what is today central Sudan and southern Egypt.

Did Corn Fuel Cahokia’s Rise?

A new study suggests that corn was the staple subsistence crop that allowed the pre-Columbian city of Cahokia to rise to prominence and flourish for nearly 300 years.

The Real Dracula?

“Dracula”, published in 1897 by the Irish Author Bram Stoker, introduced audiences to the infamous Count and his dark world of sired vampiric minions.

ARCHAEOLOGY

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ANTHROPOLOGY

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.

PALAEO ANTHROPOLOGY

PALAEONTOLOGY

Different tracks, same dinosaurs: Brown researchers dig deeper into dinosaur movements

When picturing dinosaur tracks, most people imagine a perfectly preserved mold of a foot on firm layer of earth.

New Family of Extinct Giant Wombat-Like Marsupial Discovered

The unique remains of a prehistoric, giant wombat-like marsupial - Mukupirna nambensis - that was unearthed in central Australia are so different from all other previously known extinct animals that it has been placed in a whole new family of marsupials.

Research reveals a nest of exceptionally small non-avian theropod egg fossils

When most of us think of dinosaurs, we envision large, lumbering beasts, but these giants shared their ecosystems with much smaller dinosaurs, the smaller skeletons of which were generally less likely to be preserved.
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SPACE & PLANETARY

Dying Stars Breathe Life into Earth

As dying stars take their final few breaths of life, they gently sprinkle their ashes into the cosmos through the magnificent planetary nebulae.

Higher Concentration of Metal in Moon’s Craters Provides New Insights to its Origin

Life on Earth would not be possible without the Moon; it keeps our planet's axis of rotation stable, which controls seasons and regulates our climate.

Scientist Find Multiple Planet System Orbiting Gliese 887

The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for detailed study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System.

GEOLOGY

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NATURAL HISTORY

First Evidence of Snake-Like Venom Glands Found in Amphibians

Caecilians are limbless amphibians that, to the untrained eye, can be easily mistaken for snakes.

Sledge Dogs Closely Related to 9,500-Year-Old ‘Ancient Dog’

A new study on the origins of the sledge dog by the University of Copenhagen suggests they adapted to the Artic much earlier than previously thought.

New UD study shows that tropical forest loss is increased by large-scale land acquisitions

In recent years, there has been a rise in foreign and domestic large-scale land acquisitions--defined as being at least roughly one square mile--in Latin America, Asia, and Africa where investing countries and multinational investors take out long-term contracts to use the land for various enterprises.

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The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

Homo heidelbergensis used wooden weapons to hunt waterbirds and horses.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Medicinal and Ritualistic Uses for Chocolate in Mesoamerica

Chocolate finds its way onto even the most simplistic dessert menus today to satisfy the sweetest sweet-tooth. In ancient Mesoamerica, chocolate was deemed a specialty food, achieving a sacred status.

MAPPING TOOLS

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Dying Stars Breathe Life into Earth

As dying stars take their final few breaths of life, they gently sprinkle their ashes into the cosmos through the magnificent planetary nebulae.

Norman Conquest of 1066 Did Little to Change People’s Eating Habits

Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England.

Tanis – The Ancient Egyptian Capital

Tanis is an archaeological site and ancient Egyptian city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile River delta near the modern-day town of Ṣān al-Ḥajar al-Qibliyyah.

Nan Madol – Capital of the Saudeleur Dynasty

Nan Madol is an archaeological site and former capital of the Saudeleur Dynasty, located on Temwen Island off the shores of the island of Pohnpei, in the modern-day Federated States of Micronesia.

Deadman’s Island

Located in the Medway estuary near the Isle of Sheppey in Kent, England lies Deadman’s Island, a small uninspiring stretch of land that contains a dark secret.  

Typhoon Changed Earthquake Patterns

The Earth's crust is under constant stress. Every now and then this stress is discharged in heavy earthquakes, mostly caused by the slow movement of Earth's crustal plates.

First Evidence of Snake-Like Venom Glands Found in Amphibians

Caecilians are limbless amphibians that, to the untrained eye, can be easily mistaken for snakes.

Archaeologists Discover Ancient Ochre Mine that Unlocks the lives of Early Americans

Researchers have determined that the cave system was inhabited from between 12,000-10,000 years ago, predating the rise of Maya culture and was occupied for around 2,000 years.

Tintagel – Castle of the Dumnonians

Tintagel Castle is an archaeological site and medieval fortification located on a headland next to the modern-day village of Tintagel in Cornwall, England.

Higher Concentration of Metal in Moon’s Craters Provides New Insights to its Origin

Life on Earth would not be possible without the Moon; it keeps our planet's axis of rotation stable, which controls seasons and regulates our climate.

Paleoclimatology Study Shows Global Warming has Upended 6,500 Years of Cooling

Over the past 150 years, global warming has more than undone the global cooling that occurred over the past six millennia, according to a major study in Nature Research's Scientific Data, "Holocene global mean surface temperature, a multi-method reconstruction approach."

Different tracks, same dinosaurs: Brown researchers dig deeper into dinosaur movements

When picturing dinosaur tracks, most people imagine a perfectly preserved mold of a foot on firm layer of earth.

Ancient Underwater Aboriginal Sites Discovered off Australian Coast

The first underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites have been discovered off northwest Australia dating back thousands of years ago when the current seabed was dry land.

Did Corn Fuel Cahokia’s Rise?

A new study suggests that corn was the staple subsistence crop that allowed the pre-Columbian city of Cahokia to rise to prominence and flourish for nearly 300 years.

Mont-Saint-Michel

Mont-Saint-Michel is a commune of the Le Mont-Saint-Michel, in the département of Manche, located on the coast of Normandy, France.

Welcome to HeritageDaily

HeritageDaily is a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community. First launched as a small blog in 2011, the platform has grown into a general science publisher numbering hundreds of thousands of visitors a month, with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology. HeritageDaily is independent of outside interests or political and commercial pressures that could undermine editorial integrity. We pride ourselves in remaining a factual pseudo-free platform and a valued resource to the academic community.