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THE LATEST RESEARCH & DISCOVERIES

Nineveh – The Neo-Assyrian Capital

Nineveh is an ancient Assyrian city, located on the east bank of the Tigris River near the present-day city of Mosul in northern Iraq.

Study Finds Ancient Gravettian Art Culture Much More Widespread Than Thought

Recently discovered rock art from caves in Northern Spain represents an artistic cultural style common across ancient Europe, but previously unknown from the Iberian Peninsula, according to a study by Diego Garate of the Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Prehistóricas de Cantabria, Spain, and colleagues.

Cracking the Secrets of Dinosaur Eggshells

Since the famous discovery of dinosaur eggs in the Gobi Desert in the early 1920s, the fossilized remains have captured the imaginations of paleontologists and the public, alike.

Antarctica Yields Oldest Fossils of Giant Birds With 21-foot Wingspans

Fossils recovered from Antarctica in the 1980s represent the oldest giant members of an extinct group of birds that patrolled the southern oceans with wingspans of up to 21 feet that would dwarf the 11½-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.

The Classis Britannica – The Roman Navy of Britannia

The Classis Britannica refers to a provincial naval fleet that served to protect the waters around the Roman province of Britannia and the English Channel.

Modern Computational Tools May Open a New Era for Fossil Pollen Research

One of the best sources of information on the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems and plant diversity over millions of years is fossil pollen.

Inks Containing Lead Were Likely Used as Drier on Ancient Egyptian Papyri

Analysing 12 ancient Egyptian papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy, University of Copenhagen researchers were surprised to find previously unknown lead compounds in both red and black inks and suggest they were used for their drying properties rather than as a pigment.

Roman Sex, Sexuality, Slaves and Lex Scantinia

In ancient Rome, Latin has no equivalent translation for defining homosexuality, nor heterosexuality as an individual’s sexual nature. Gay or straight, there would be no distinction.

Legio IX Hispana – The Lost Roman Legion

One of the most debated mysteries from the Roman period involves the disappearance of the Legio IX Hispana, a legion of the Imperial Roman Army that supposedly vanished sometime after AD 120.

The Secret Hellfire Club and the Hellfire Caves

The Hellfire Club was an exclusive membership-based organisation for high-society rakes, that was first founded in London in 1718, by Philip, Duke of Wharton, and several of society's elites.

ARCHAEOLOGY

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ANTHROPOLOGY

Anglo-Saxon Woman Mutilated as Punishment

Archaeologists conducting research at Oakridge in Basingstoke, England have revealed that the remains of an Anglo-Saxon woman excavated during the 1960’s was severely mutilated, which most likely resulted in her death.

An Iron Age Massacre Frozen in Time

La Hoya is an archaeological site of the Bronze and Iron Ages of the Basque Country, which was destroyed between 350-200 BC during a violent attack on the inhabitants.

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

PALAEO ANTHROPOLOGY

PALAEONTOLOGY

Cracking the Secrets of Dinosaur Eggshells

Since the famous discovery of dinosaur eggs in the Gobi Desert in the early 1920s, the fossilized remains have captured the imaginations of paleontologists and the public, alike.

Antarctica Yields Oldest Fossils of Giant Birds With 21-foot Wingspans

Fossils recovered from Antarctica in the 1980s represent the oldest giant members of an extinct group of birds that patrolled the southern oceans with wingspans of up to 21 feet that would dwarf the 11½-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.

African Crocodiles Lived in Spain Six Million Years Ago

Millions of years ago, several species of crocodiles of different genera and characteristics inhabited Europe and sometimes even coexisted.
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SPACE & PLANETARY

The Milky Way Galaxy has a Clumpy Halo

University of Iowa astronomers have determined our galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy halo of hot gases that is continually being supplied with material ejected by birthing or dying stars.

Magnetic Fields on the Moon are the Remnant of an Ancient Core Dynamo

Presently, the moon does not have an internal magnetic field as it can be observed on Earth. However, there are localized regions on its surface up to several hundred kilometers in size where a very strong magnetic field prevails.

Geoscience: Cosmic Diamonds Formed During Gigantic Planetary Collisions

It is estimated that over 10 million asteroids are circling the Earth in the asteroid belt. They are relics from the early days of our solar system, when our planets formed out of a large cloud of gas and dust rotating around the sun.

GEOLOGY

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NATURAL HISTORY

Cognitive Elements of Language Have Existed for 40 Million Years

Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions - monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown.

Artificial Intelligence Reveals Hundreds of Millions of Trees in the Sahara

If you think that the Sahara is covered only by golden dunes and scorched rocks, you aren't alone. Perhaps it's time to shelve that notion.

DNA Study Reveals Insights About the Scimitar-Toothed Cat

Along with the woolly mammoth and the giant ground sloth, the sabre-toothed cats were probably among the most famous animals that lived during the Pleistocene Epoch and went extinct before the end of last ice age. Over the years, sabre-toothed cats have also been the subject of many research projects.

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The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

Homo heidelbergensis used wooden weapons to hunt waterbirds and horses.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Medicinal and Ritualistic Uses for Chocolate in Mesoamerica

Chocolate finds its way onto even the most simplistic dessert menus today to satisfy the sweetest sweet-tooth. In ancient Mesoamerica, chocolate was deemed a specialty food, achieving a sacred status.

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Nineveh – The Neo-Assyrian Capital

Nineveh is an ancient Assyrian city, located on the east bank of the Tigris River near the present-day city of Mosul in northern Iraq.

Study Finds Ancient Gravettian Art Culture Much More Widespread Than Thought

Recently discovered rock art from caves in Northern Spain represents an artistic cultural style common across ancient Europe, but previously unknown from the Iberian Peninsula, according to a study by Diego Garate of the Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Prehistóricas de Cantabria, Spain, and colleagues.

Cracking the Secrets of Dinosaur Eggshells

Since the famous discovery of dinosaur eggs in the Gobi Desert in the early 1920s, the fossilized remains have captured the imaginations of paleontologists and the public, alike.

Antarctica Yields Oldest Fossils of Giant Birds With 21-foot Wingspans

Fossils recovered from Antarctica in the 1980s represent the oldest giant members of an extinct group of birds that patrolled the southern oceans with wingspans of up to 21 feet that would dwarf the 11½-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.

The Classis Britannica – The Roman Navy of Britannia

The Classis Britannica refers to a provincial naval fleet that served to protect the waters around the Roman province of Britannia and the English Channel.

Modern Computational Tools May Open a New Era for Fossil Pollen Research

One of the best sources of information on the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems and plant diversity over millions of years is fossil pollen.

Inks Containing Lead Were Likely Used as Drier on Ancient Egyptian Papyri

Analysing 12 ancient Egyptian papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy, University of Copenhagen researchers were surprised to find previously unknown lead compounds in both red and black inks and suggest they were used for their drying properties rather than as a pigment.

Camulodunum – The First Capital of Britannia

Camulodunum was a Roman city and the first capital of the Roman province of Britannia, in what is now the present-day city of Colchester in Essex, England.

African Crocodiles Lived in Spain Six Million Years Ago

Millions of years ago, several species of crocodiles of different genera and characteristics inhabited Europe and sometimes even coexisted.

Bat-Winged Dinosaurs That Could Glide

Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, according to a new study led by an international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson.

Ancient Maya Built Sophisticated Water Filters

Ancient Maya in the once-bustling city of Tikal built sophisticated water filters using natural materials they imported from miles away, according to the University of Cincinnati.

New Clues Revealed About Clovis People

There is much debate surrounding the age of the Clovis - a prehistoric culture named for stone tools found near Clovis, New Mexico in the early 1930s - who once occupied North America during the end of the last Ice Age.

Cognitive Elements of Language Have Existed for 40 Million Years

Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions - monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown.

Bronze Age Herders Were Less Mobile Than Previously Thought

Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought.

Legio IX Hispana – The Lost Roman Legion

One of the most debated mysteries from the Roman period involves the disappearance of the Legio IX Hispana, a legion of the Imperial Roman Army that supposedly vanished sometime after AD 120.

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HeritageDaily is a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community. First launched as a small blog in 2011, the platform has grown into a general science publisher numbering hundreds of thousands of visitors a month, with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology. HeritageDaily is independent of outside interests or political and commercial pressures that could undermine editorial integrity. We pride ourselves in remaining a factual pseudo-free platform and a valued resource to the academic community.