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Venta Icenorum – Caistor Roman Town

Venta Icenorum is an archaeological site and the remains of a Roman town located near modern-day Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk England.

Evidence for Oldest Prehistoric Textiles in Scotland Discovered at the Ness of Brodgar, Orkney

Evidence of woven Neolithic textile has been confirmed at the University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute research excavation at the Ness of Brodgar.

Asteroids Bennu and Ryugu may have formed directly from collision in space

Scientists with NASA's first asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are gaining a new understanding of asteroid Bennu's carbon-rich material and signature "spinning-top" shape.

Study shows today’s atmospheric carbon dioxide levels greater than 23 million-year record

A common message in use to convey the seriousness of climate change to the public is: "Carbon dioxide levels are higher today than they have been for the past one million years!"

A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere

With the development of science and technology, human's activity was and is expanding from land, sea and sky to the space and other planets.

Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish

Mexican cavefish spend their entire lives in the dark. With no need for vision, many of them lost functional eyes.

Viroconium – Wroxeter Roman City

Viroconium, now named Wroxeter Roman City is an archaeological site located in the village of Wroxeter in Shropshire, England.

The Kingdom of Aksum – Africa’s lost Empire

The Aksumite Empire was an ancient kingdom that existed in Ethiopia from 100 CE to 940 CE. Centred on the city of Axum in Ethiopia, the nation grew from the proto-Aksumite Iron Age period around 400 BCE to its height around the 1st century CE.

The Archaeology of Space

Rather than looking down, the future of archaeology may one day look up to the stars.

The Real Assassin’s Creed

The word “Assassin” is a term that has been used to describe a fedayeen group within the Nizari Ismailis State that formed when followers of Nizarism split within Ismailism, a branch of Shia Islam.

ARCHAEOLOGY

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ANTHROPOLOGY

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.

PALAEO ANTHROPOLOGY

PALAEONTOLOGY

Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom

The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom.

In stressed ecosystems Jurassic dinosaurs turned to scavenging, maybe even cannibalism

Among dinosaurs of ancient Colorado, scavenging and possibly cannibalism were responses to a resource-scarce environment, according to a study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stephanie Drumheller of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and colleagues.

Finding a genus home for Alaska’s dinosaurs

A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus that lived over a broad latitudinal range extending into the Arctic.
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SPACE & PLANETARY

Asteroids Bennu and Ryugu may have formed directly from collision in space

Scientists with NASA's first asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are gaining a new understanding of asteroid Bennu's carbon-rich material and signature "spinning-top" shape.

A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere

With the development of science and technology, human's activity was and is expanding from land, sea and sky to the space and other planets.

ESPRESSO confirms the presence of an Earth around the nearest star

The existence of a planet the size of Earth around the closest star in the solar system, Proxima Centauri, has been confirmed by an international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE).

GEOLOGY

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NATURAL HISTORY

Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish

Mexican cavefish spend their entire lives in the dark. With no need for vision, many of them lost functional eyes.

Taking a deep look into animals

Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a collaborative project driven by researchers of the Max Perutz Labs Vienna, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, and the TU Wien (Vienna) allows researchers to look deep into organs and nervous systems of animals, ranging from squids and worms to fish and salamanders.

Warming climate is changing where birds breed

Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. But a recent study published in Proceedings...

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The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

Homo heidelbergensis used wooden weapons to hunt waterbirds and horses.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Medicinal and Ritualistic Uses for Chocolate in Mesoamerica

Chocolate finds its way onto even the most simplistic dessert menus today to satisfy the sweetest sweet-tooth. In ancient Mesoamerica, chocolate was deemed a specialty food, achieving a sacred status.

MAPPING TOOLS

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Venta Icenorum – Caistor Roman Town

Venta Icenorum is an archaeological site and the remains of a Roman town located near modern-day Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk England.

Evidence for Oldest Prehistoric Textiles in Scotland Discovered at the Ness of Brodgar, Orkney

Evidence of woven Neolithic textile has been confirmed at the University of the Highlands and Islands Archaeology Institute research excavation at the Ness of Brodgar.

Asteroids Bennu and Ryugu may have formed directly from collision in space

Scientists with NASA's first asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are gaining a new understanding of asteroid Bennu's carbon-rich material and signature "spinning-top" shape.

Study shows today’s atmospheric carbon dioxide levels greater than 23 million-year record

A common message in use to convey the seriousness of climate change to the public is: "Carbon dioxide levels are higher today than they have been for the past one million years!"

A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere

With the development of science and technology, human's activity was and is expanding from land, sea and sky to the space and other planets.

Gene found that causes eyes to wither in cavefish

Mexican cavefish spend their entire lives in the dark. With no need for vision, many of them lost functional eyes.

Viroconium – Wroxeter Roman City

Viroconium, now named Wroxeter Roman City is an archaeological site located in the village of Wroxeter in Shropshire, England.

Ravenser Odd – The Lost Town That Sank Beneath the Sea

Ravenser Odd, also called Ravensrodd was a port town in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England on the sandbanks of the Spurn heritage coast in the Humber estuary.

Archaeologists Excavate Roman Villa at Pompeii

Archaeologists at the Roman city of Pompeii have recommenced excavations working on the Civita Giuliana, a large villa in the ancient city suburbs.

Persepolis – Ceremonial Capital of the Achaemenid Empire

Persepolis is an archaeological site and the ceremonial capital city of the Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire that covered an area of 2.1 million square miles from the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper in the west, to the Indus Valley in the east.

Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom

The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom.

ESPRESSO confirms the presence of an Earth around the nearest star

The existence of a planet the size of Earth around the closest star in the solar system, Proxima Centauri, has been confirmed by an international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE).

Mari – The Ancient City State

Mari is an archaeological site, located near Abu Kamal on the western bank of the Euphrates in Syria.

‘Distance’ from the brightest stars is key to preserving primordial discs

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope was used to conduct a three-year study of the crowded, massive and young star cluster Westerlund 2.

Aquae Sulis – Roman Bath

Aquae Sulis, meaning "the waters of Sulis" was a Roman town in the province of Britannia, located in the modern-day city of Bath in England.

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HeritageDaily is a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community. First launched as a small blog in 2011, the platform has grown into a general science publisher numbering hundreds of thousands of visitors a month, with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology. HeritageDaily is independent of outside interests or political and commercial pressures that could undermine editorial integrity. We pride ourselves in remaining a factual pseudo-free platform and a valued resource to the academic community.