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THE LATEST RESEARCH & DISCOVERIES

Hattusa – The Hittite Capital

The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people, who established an empire covering Anatolia, northern Levant, and Upper Mesopotamia.

Underwater archaeologists from INAH discover 200-year-old wreck

Underwater archaeologists from the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia have announced the discovery of a shipwreck off the coast of Quintana Roo state in Mexico.

Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world’s first cities

New research on one history's most important trading hubs provides some of the earliest genetic glimpses at the movement and interactions of populations that lived in parts of Western Asia between two major events in human history: the origins of agriculture and the rise of some of the world's first cities.

Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes

The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant--which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria--during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites.

Archaeologists Discover Giant Defensive Minefield From Roman Iron Age

Archaeologists from the Museum Lolland-Falster have discovered a large 770-metre-long defensive earthwork belt that dates from around the Roman Iron Age near Rødbyhavn on Lolland, Denmark.

Roman Iron Age Gaming Pieces Found in Norwegian Cairn

Archaeologists from the University Museum of Bergen have excavated a grave cairn in Western Norway and discovered several gaming pieces from the Roman Iron Age.

Wirral’s Industrial Past Unearthed at Former Docks

Insights into the Wirral’s industrial past have been unearthed at Peel L&P’s Wirral Waters, with the remains of various alkali, iron, lead and copper works being among the early industrial operations discovered.

A History of Harta

Harta is a village located 100 km south of Budapest on the banks of the River Danube, famed for its bespoke artisan craftsmanship, unique floral art and local village customs that sets it apart from the rest of Hungary.

The Archaeology of Space

Rather than looking down, the future of archaeology may one day look up to the stars.

The Real Assassin’s Creed

The word “Assassin” is a term that has been used to describe a fedayeen group within the Nizari Ismailis State that formed when followers of Nizarism split within Ismailism, a branch of Shia Islam.

ARCHAEOLOGY

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ANTHROPOLOGY

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.

PALAEO ANTHROPOLOGY

PALAEONTOLOGY

In stressed ecosystems Jurassic dinosaurs turned to scavenging, maybe even cannibalism

Among dinosaurs of ancient Colorado, scavenging and possibly cannibalism were responses to a resource-scarce environment, according to a study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stephanie Drumheller of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and colleagues.

Finding a genus home for Alaska’s dinosaurs

A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus that lived over a broad latitudinal range extending into the Arctic.

Ancient Great White Shark Fossil Nursury Discovered

Paleo-kindergarten ensured evolutionary success millions of years ago for the great white shark, one of the most charismatic, but also one of the most infamous sharks.
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HERITAGE

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SPACE & PLANETARY

Cosmic bursts unveil universe’s missing matter

Astronomers have used mysterious fast radio bursts to solve a decades-old mystery of 'missing matter', long predicted to exist in the Universe but never detected--until now.

Under pressure, black holes feast

It has been known for some time that when distant galaxies --and the supermassive black holes within their cores -- aggregate into clusters, these clusters create a volatile, highly pressurized environment.

Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space

In the past decade, there has been renewed thinking about missions to the moon, perhaps even to Mars.

GEOLOGY

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NATURAL HISTORY

Warming climate is changing where birds breed

Spring is in full swing. Trees are leafing out, flowers are blooming, bees are buzzing, and birds are singing. But a recent study published in Proceedings...

Researchers uncover the arks of genetic diversity in terrestrial mammals

Maximizing the protection of life on Earth requires knowledge of the global patterns of biodiversity at multiple dimensions, from genetic diversity within species, to species and ecosystem diversity.

Research into Algal genome reveals new understanding of first land plants 

Researchers from Cornell University have studied the genome of a single-celled alga that belongs to the closest lineage to terrestrial plants and provides many clues to how aquatic plants first colonized land.

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The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

Homo heidelbergensis used wooden weapons to hunt waterbirds and horses.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Medicinal and Ritualistic Uses for Chocolate in Mesoamerica

Chocolate finds its way onto even the most simplistic dessert menus today to satisfy the sweetest sweet-tooth. In ancient Mesoamerica, chocolate was deemed a specialty food, achieving a sacred status.

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Hattusa – The Hittite Capital

The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people, who established an empire covering Anatolia, northern Levant, and Upper Mesopotamia.

Underwater archaeologists from INAH discover 200-year-old wreck

Underwater archaeologists from the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia have announced the discovery of a shipwreck off the coast of Quintana Roo state in Mexico.

Genomic analysis shows long-term genetic mixing in West Asia before world’s first cities

New research on one history's most important trading hubs provides some of the earliest genetic glimpses at the movement and interactions of populations that lived in parts of Western Asia between two major events in human history: the origins of agriculture and the rise of some of the world's first cities.

Who were the Canaanites? New insight from 73 ancient genomes

The people who lived in the area known as the Southern Levant--which is now recognized as Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, Lebanon, and parts of Syria--during the Bronze Age (circa 3500-1150 BCE) are referred to in ancient biblical texts as the Canaanites.

Archaeologists Discover Giant Defensive Minefield From Roman Iron Age

Archaeologists from the Museum Lolland-Falster have discovered a large 770-metre-long defensive earthwork belt that dates from around the Roman Iron Age near Rødbyhavn on Lolland, Denmark.

Roman Iron Age Gaming Pieces Found in Norwegian Cairn

Archaeologists from the University Museum of Bergen have excavated a grave cairn in Western Norway and discovered several gaming pieces from the Roman Iron Age.

Wirral’s Industrial Past Unearthed at Former Docks

Insights into the Wirral’s industrial past have been unearthed at Peel L&P’s Wirral Waters, with the remains of various alkali, iron, lead and copper works being among the early industrial operations discovered.

Cosmic bursts unveil universe’s missing matter

Astronomers have used mysterious fast radio bursts to solve a decades-old mystery of 'missing matter', long predicted to exist in the Universe but never detected--until now.

Under pressure, black holes feast

It has been known for some time that when distant galaxies --and the supermassive black holes within their cores -- aggregate into clusters, these clusters create a volatile, highly pressurized environment.

New clues to deep earthquake mystery

A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth.

ADHD: genomic analysis in samples of Neanderthals and modern humans

The frequency of genetic variants associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has decreased progressively in the evolutionary human lineage from the Palaeolithic to nowadays, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Yale finds a (much) earlier birth date for tectonic plates

Yale geophysicists reported that Earth's ever-shifting, an underground network of tectonic plates was firmly in place more than 4 billion years ago -- at least a billion years earlier than scientists generally thought.

Initial Upper Paleolithic technology reached North China by ~41,000 years ago

A wave of new technology in the Late Paleolithic had reached North China by around 41,000 years ago, according to a study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fei Peng of the Minzu University of China, Beijing and colleagues.

In stressed ecosystems Jurassic dinosaurs turned to scavenging, maybe even cannibalism

Among dinosaurs of ancient Colorado, scavenging and possibly cannibalism were responses to a resource-scarce environment, according to a study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stephanie Drumheller of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and colleagues.

Finding a genus home for Alaska’s dinosaurs

A re-analysis of dinosaur skulls from northern Alaska suggests they belong to a genus that lived over a broad latitudinal range extending into the Arctic.

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HeritageDaily is a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community. First launched as a small blog in 2011, the platform has grown into a general science publisher numbering hundreds of thousands of visitors a month, with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology. HeritageDaily is independent of outside interests or political and commercial pressures that could undermine editorial integrity. We pride ourselves in remaining a factual pseudo-free platform and a valued resource to the academic community.