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Volcanoes under pressure

When will the next eruption take place? Examination of samples from Indonesia's Mount Merapi show that the explosivity of stratovolcanoes rises when mineral-rich gases seal the pores and microcracks in the uppermost layers of stone. These findings result in new possibilities for the prediction of an eruption.

Machu Picchu: Ancient Incan sanctuary intentionally built on faults

The ancient Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu is considered one of humanity's greatest architectural achievements.

How and when was carbon distributed in the Earth?

It is generally accepted that planetary surfaces were covered with molten silicate, a “magma ocean”, during the formation of terrestrial planets. In a deep magma...

Ages of the Navajo Sandstone

The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye...

First direct evidence for a mantle plume origin of Jurassic flood basalts in southern Africa

The origin of gigantic magma eruptions that led to global climatic crises and extinctions of species has remained controversial.

Cosmic pearls: Fossil clams in Florida contain evidence of ancient meteorite

Researchers picking through the contents of fossil clams from a Sarasota County quarry found dozens of tiny glass beads, likely the calling cards of an ancient meteorite.

Scientists discover how and when a subterranean ocean emerged

"The mechanism which caused the crust that had been altered by seawater to sink into the mantle functioned over 3.3 billion years ago.

10 of the largest “Super Volcanoes”

A supervolcano is classified as a volcano with an eruption magnitude of 8, the largest value on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) where the volume of deposits for that eruption is greater than 1,000 cubic kilometers (240 cubic miles).

New model suggests lost continents for early Earth

A new radioactivity model of Earth’s ancient rocks calls into question current models for the formation of Earth’s continental crust, suggesting continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.