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CT Scans Reveals Pharaoh Seqenenre-Taa-II was Executed by Multiple Attackers

Modern medical technology is helping scholars tell a more nuanced story about the fate of an ancient king whose violent death indirectly led to the reunification of Egypt in the 16th century BC. 

New Study Uncovers Rare “Mud Carapace” Mortuary Treatment of Egyptian Mummy

New analysis of a 20th Dynasty mummified individual reveals her rare mud carapace, according to a study by Karin Sowada from Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, and colleagues.

Study Suggests Environmental Factors Had a Role in the Evolution of Human Tolerance

Environmental pressures may have led humans to become more tolerant and friendly towards each other as the need to share food and raw materials became mutually beneficial, a new study suggests.

Scientific Study of Believed Remains of Apostles

In Rome lies the Santi Apostoli church, cared for by Franciscan brothers for more than 500 years. For more than 1500 years, this site has held the believed remains of two of the earliest Christians and Jesu apostles: St. Philip and St. James the Younger - relics of the Holy Catholic Church.

Burial Practices Point to an Interconnected Early Medieval Europe

Early Medieval Europe is frequently viewed as a time of cultural stagnation, often given the misnomer of the 'Dark Ages'. However, analysis has revealed new ideas could spread rapidly as communities were interconnected, creating a surprisingly unified culture in Europe.

Ancient DNA Sheds Light on the Mariana Islanders Ancestry

To reach the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, humans crossed more than 2,000 kilometres of open ocean, and around 2,000 years earlier than any other sea travel over an equally long distance.

Evidence of Oldest Gynaecological Treatment on Record, Performed in Ancient Egypt 4,000 Years Ago

Scientists from the Universities of Granada and Jaén are studying the physical evidence found in the mummified remains of a woman who suffered severe trauma to the pelvis in 1878–1797 BC, linking them to a medical treatment described in various Egyptian medical papyri of the time

Anglo-Saxon Woman Mutilated as Punishment

Archaeologists conducting research at Oakridge in Basingstoke, England have revealed that the remains of an Anglo-Saxon woman excavated during the 1960’s was severely mutilated, which most likely resulted in her death.

An Iron Age Massacre Frozen in Time

La Hoya is an archaeological site of the Bronze and Iron Ages of the Basque Country, which was destroyed between 350-200 BC during a violent attack on the inhabitants.

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.