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15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.

Examining heart extractions in ancient Mesoamerica

Sacrificial rituals featuring human heart extraction were a prevalent religious practice throughout ancient Mesoamerican societies.

Brain surgery was conducted in Eastern Roman Empire

New research from Adelphi University has revealed the first forensically-assessed archeological discovery of remains of a group of domineering mounted archer-lancers and their kin of the Eastern Roman Empire from the turbulent ProtoByzantine period, which spanned the fourth to seventh centuries.

What chemical analyzes of human bones tell us about kitchen utensils in the Middle Ages

Clay pots? Wooden spoons? Copper pots? Silver forks? What materials has man used for making kitchen utensils throughout history? A new study now sheds light on the use of kitchen utensils made of copper.

Task sharing in hunters-gatherers does not depend on the capacities of each gender

In current hunter-gatherer groups, women usually transport greater loads than men, therefore some scientists had indicated they were energetically more efficient when performing these tasks.

Your back pain may be due to evolution and spine shape

The cause of back pain can be linked to humanity's evolutionary past, according to new research from a team of bioarchaeologists at Simon Fraser University, the University of Liverpool, and the University of Sydney.

Bones of the victims at Roman Herculaneum

Are human remains the archaeology of death or the archaeology of life? This strange paradox stated in Pearson (1999), addresses that the surviving bones, tissues and skin are more likely to reveal information about a person’s life, not a person’s death.

Hunter-gatherers facilitated a cultural revolution through small social networks

Hunter-gatherer ancestors, from around 300,000 years ago, facilitated a cultural revolution by developing ideas in small social networks, and regularly drawing on knowledge from neighbouring camps.

Medieval hospital was ‘last resort’ for Black Death victims

‘A Black Death mass grave at Thornton Abbey: the discovery and examination of a fourteenth-century rural catastrophe’ Hugh Willmott, Peter Townend, Diana Mahoney Swales, Hendrik Poinar, Katherine Eaton & Jennifer Klunk Archaeologists have found a mass grave at Thornton Abbey in Lincolnshire, England.

Cognitive experiments give a glimpse into the ancient mind

Symbolic behaviour - such as language, account keeping, music, art, and narrative - constitutes a milestone in human cognitive evolution.