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Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry

When Spanish invaders arrived in the Americas, they were generally able to subjugate the local peoples thanks, in part, to their superior weaponry and technology.

Well-engineered ‘watercourts’ stored live fish, fueling Florida’s Calusa kingdom

The mighty Calusa ruled South Florida for centuries, wielding military power, trading and collecting tribute along routes that sprawled hundreds of miles, creating shell islands, erecting enormous buildings and dredging canals wider than some highways. Unlike the Aztecs, Maya and Inca, who built their empires with the help of agriculture, the Calusa kingdom was founded on fishing.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Prehistoric artifacts suggest a neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea

New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea - illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5050 and 4200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia.

Romans already had miniature dogs as pets over 2,000 years ago

Like many dog lovers today, the Romans had 'miniature dogs' as pets that were similar in size to Pekingese or some types of Chihuahua.

Maize, not metal, key to native settlements’ history in NY

New Cornell University research is producing a more accurate historical timeline for the occupation of Native American sites in upstate New York, based on radiocarbon dating of organic materials and statistical modeling.

Ancient secret of lightning strikes at stone circles revealed

New evidence of a massive lightning strike at the centre of a stone circle in the Outer Hebrides may help shed light on why these monuments were created thousands of years ago.

Children are doing archaeology – and becoming experts who enrich whole communities

Keig, Aberdeenshire. A gaggle of excited children are instructing community archaeologist Colin Shepherd when to drop a china mug on the floor so that they can see how it breaks on impact.

The life and death of one of America’s most mysterious trees

A majestic ponderosa pine, standing tall in what is widely thought to have been the "center of the world" for the Ancestral Puebloan people, may have more mundane origins than previously believed, according to research led by tree-ring experts at the University of Arizona.