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Ancient Egyptian Manual Reveals New Details About Mummification

Based on a manual recently discovered in a 3,500-year-old medical papyrus, University of Copenhagen Egyptologist Sofie Schiødt has been able to help reconstruct the embalming process used to prepare ancient Egyptians for the afterlife. It is the oldest surviving manual on mummification yet discovered.

Virtual Interactive Environment of Ancient Tomb of Ramesses VI

The tomb of Pharaoh Ramesses VI in the Valley of the Kings has been digitally scanned to create a virtual interactive high-resolution environment.

Virtual Interactive Environment of Ancient Egyptian Temple of Abu Simbel

The Great Temple of Ramesses II at Abu Simbel in Egypt has been digitally scanned to create a virtual interactive high-resolution environment.

Historical Document Details Martyrdom of Japanese Christian Retainers 400 Years Ago

In Japan, the suppression of Christianity increased from the end of the 16th century to the beginning of the 17th century, and many missionaries and Japanese believers were martyred during this period.

The Bayeux Tapestry Depicting Events of Norman Conquest Goes Digital

The Bayeux Tapestry, a 70-metre-long embroidered cloth that depicts the events of the Norman conquest of England, culminating in the Battle of Hastings has been digitised in high resolution and made available to the public.

Exploring the Avebury Stone Circle Landscape

The area was designated part of the Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites by UNESCO in 1986, in recognition for one of the most architecturally sophisticated stone circles in the world, in addition to the rich Neolithic, and Bronze age remains found nearby, such as the West Kennet Avenue, Beckhampton Avenue, West Kennet Long Barrow, the Sanctuary, and Windmill Hill.

How Chariot Racing Teams Saved Constantinople From the Huns

Chariot Racing “ludi circenses” was one of the foremost sports of the Roman and Byzantine Empire, where competing teams would race either in four-horse chariots (quadrigae), or two-horse chariots (bigae) around a hippodrome or circus.

The Roman Penises Carved into Hadrian’s Wall

Across the length of the wall corridor, and at military installations, 59 known etchings of male genitalia, otherwise known as a fascinus or fascinum were carved at various locations to symbolise the male phallus.

New Study Suggests Richard III Murdered the Princes in the Tower

The “Princes in the Tower” is an expression frequently used to refer to the young King Edward V of England, and Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, who were placed in the Tower of London by the regent, the Duke of Gloucester (Richard III).

The Siege of Masada

The Siege of Masada was one of the final chapters during the First Jewish-Roman War, where Sicarrii rebels and their families were besieged in the mountain palace/fortress of Masada, overlooking the Dead Sea in Israel.

Pace of Prehistoric Human Innovation Could be Revealed by ‘Linguistic Thermometer’

Multi-disciplinary researchers at The University of Manchester have helped develop a powerful physics-based tool to map the pace of language development and human innovation over thousands of years - even stretching into pre-history before records were kept.

The Roman Conquest of Wales

The conquest of Wales began in either AD 47 or 48, following the landing of Roman forces in Britannia sent by Emperor Claudius in AD 43.