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Norman Conquest of 1066 Did Little to Change People’s Eating Habits

Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England.

The Real Dracula?

“Dracula”, published in 1897 by the Irish Author Bram Stoker, introduced audiences to the infamous Count and his dark world of sired vampiric minions.

Non-tobacco plant identified in ancient pipe for first time

People in what is now Washington State were smoking Rhus glabra, a plant commonly known as smooth sumac, more than 1,400 years ago.

Ancient Societies Hold Lessons for Modern Cities

Today's modern cities, from Denver to Dubai, could learn a thing or two from the ancient Pueblo communities that once stretched across the southwestern United States. For starters, the more people live together, the better the living standards.

The Great Tornado of London

One disaster that is relatively obscured from history, was a tornado that struck at the very heart of the city, as documented by contemporary chroniclers at the time.

Ravenser Odd – The Lost Town That Sank Beneath the Sea

Ravenser Odd, also called Ravensrodd was a port town in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England on the sandbanks of the Spurn heritage coast in the Humber estuary.

Finding the Hidden Palace of Otford

In the article "The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII" Diarmaid Walshe tells the story of the Lost Palace of Henry VIII up to the death of Archbishop Warham in 1532. 

The Real Assassin’s Creed

The word “Assassin” is a term that has been used to describe a fedayeen group within the Nizari Ismailis State that formed when followers of Nizarism split within Ismailism, a branch of Shia Islam.

King Henry VIII’s Nonsuch Palace

Nonsuch Palace was one of Henry VIII’s largest building projects during his reign, built as a celebration of Henry’s power and grandeur, it was meant to rival that of the French King Francis I’s Château de Chambord.

Engineers discover the secret of Italian renaissance domes

A research project by engineers from Princeton University in collaboration with project partners has discovered the secret of self-supporting masonry domes from the Italian renaissance.

The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

The Roman Empire Strikes Back

The accepted date for the collapse of the Western Roman Empire was approximately 476 CE, when the last true Roman Emperor Romulus was overthrown by Odoacer, the Germanic leader who became the first Barbarian to rule Rome.