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Was Anne Boleyn buried in the Tower of London?

Anne Boleyn, Queen of England and second wife of Henry VIII was executed within the grounds of the Tower of London. Her crime was a trumpeted up charge of adultery with two men of the court, and incest with her brother. The real reason for her execution was to remove Anne, who was an obstacle to Henry remarrying and having an heir.

Æthelred the “Unready” – The Lost King of England

Æthelred II, also dubbed the Unready was King of Saxon England during 978–1013 and 1014–1016. Under his father Kind Edgar, England had experienced a period of peace after the reconquest of the Danelaw in the mid-10th century.

When Israel flew Nazi Planes

Just how did the post-war Israeli air force end up equipping its first fighter squadrons with the famous Nazi warplane the Me-109s?

Matilda McCrear – the hidden story of the last transatlantic slave trade survivor

Johnny Crear, from Selma, Alabama, had no idea of his Grandmother Matilda’s history until her story was uncovered by Dr Hannah Durkin.

The passport of Ramesses II

In 1974, his remains were issued an Egyptian passport (nearly 3 thousand years after his death) so that he could be transported to Paris for treatment of a fungoid growth. 

The Roman Empire – Interactive Map

Map of Roman Empire - The Roman Empire was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Study reveals secret of 18th-century portrait

Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, and Russia's famed Tretyakov Gallery have conducted a comprehensive preconservation study of "The Portrait of F.P. Makerovsky in a Masquerade Costume" (1789) by the Russian painter Dmitry Levitsky. The paper was published in the journal Heritage Science.

Place names describe Scandinavia in the Iron and Viking Ages

Every now and then, researchers are lucky enough to experience a Eureka moment — when a series of facts suddenly crystallize into a an entirely new pattern.

Aboriginal scars from frontier wars

Hundreds of Aboriginal men who became native mounted police in colonial Australia carried a significant burden of responsibility for law and order for white...

First pocket-sized artworks from Ice Age Indonesia show humanity’s ancient drive to decorate

Archaeologists have unearthed two miniature stone engravings in Indonesia. These depict an anoa (dwarf buffalo) and a sun, star or eye dating back some 26,000 years – the first of their kind in our region.

A new use for museum fish specimens

The discoloured fish that rest in glass jars in museums across the world are normally used by specialists as references to study the traits...

How the extinction of ice age mammals may have forced us to invent civilisation

Why did we take so long to invent civilisation? Modern Homo sapiens first evolved roughly 250,000 to 350,000 years ago. But initial steps towards civilisation – harvesting, then domestication...