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Vindolanda – The Roman Auxiliary Fort

Vindolanda (translated as “white field” or “white moor”) was a Roman auxiliary fort, located on the fringes of the Roman Empire in the province...

Top 10 historical sites in Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire is a county in southern England that sits directly above London. With occupation stretching as far back as the Mesolithic period, Hertfordshire is rich in a variety of historical sites, monuments and ancient ruins waiting for you to explore.

London’s Lost Castles and Fortifications

When we place the words "castle" and "London" in the same context, we generally think of the Tower of London as the only fortress in defence of the London area. The cities evolution has seen its destruction and rebirth, forming the basis of the cities multi-phase defensives in a story that spans thousands of years.

Doggerland – Europe’s Lost Land

Doggerland is a submerged land mass beneath what is now the North Sea, that once connected Britain to continental Europe.

Dunwich – The medieval town lost at sea

Dunwich is a quaint seaside village in Suffolk, England that can boast a fine pub, tea room and small beach popular with holidaymakers. But underlying this picture postcard setting, Dunwich hides a unique history of a medieval town that succumbed to ruin by the elements.

The Kingdom of Zimbabwe

The Kingdom of Zimbabwe was a medieval kingdom of 150 tributaries that existed from 1220-1450 CE in modern day Zimbabwe.

The Kingdom of Aksum – Africa’s lost Empire

The Aksumite Empire was an ancient kingdom that existed in Ethiopia from 100 CE to 940 CE. Centred on the city of Axum in Ethiopia, the nation grew from the proto-Aksumite Iron Age period around 400 BCE to its height around the 1st century CE.

The Saxon Shore Forts of Britannia

Saxon Shore forts are defensive fortifications, built by the late Roman Empire to defend the coast of the Roman province of Britannia (Britain) and the opposite side of the English Channel.

Ani – The Ruined City of 1001 Churches

On the eastern borders of Turkey in the province of Kars lies the ruined Armenian city of Ani. Renowned as a cultural and commercial centre on the Silk Road, Ani grew to become a bustling metropolis of over 100,000 inhabitants at its height.