Archaeologists uncover 4,200-year-old “zombie grave”

Archaeologists from the State Office for Monument Preservation and Archaeology Saxony-Anhalt have uncovered a "zombie grave" during excavations near Oppin, Germany.

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old clay token used by pilgrims

A clay token unearthed by the Temple Mount Sifting Project, is believed to have served pilgrims exchanging offerings during the Passover festival 2,000-years-ago.

Moon may have influenced Stonehenge construction

A study by a team of archaeoastronomers are investigating the possible connection of the moon in influencing the Stonehenge builders.

Archaeologists explore the resettlement history of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor

Archaeologists are conducting a study of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor to understand how one of the largest “megacities” of the Bronze Age was abandoned and then resettled.

Excavation uncovers possible traces of Villa Augustus at Somma Vesuviana

Archaeologists from the University of Tokyo have uncovered further evidence of the Villa of Augustus during excavations at Somma Vesuviana.

Study reveals new insights into wreck of royal flagship Gribshunden

Underwater archaeologists from Södertörn University, in collaboration with the CEMAS/Institute for Archaeology and Ancient Culture at Stockholm University, have conducted an investigation of the wreck of the royal flagship Gribshunden.

Microbe X-32 – Is the Plasticene Era coming to an end?

Breaking, a new venture in collaboration with Harvard and the Wyss Institute, is claiming that a new discovery, Microbe X-32, can naturally break down polyolefins, polyesters, and polyamides in just 22 months.

Stone sphere among artefacts repatriated to Costa Rica

395 pre-Columbian artefacts have been repatriated to Costa Rica thanks to a grant by the United States Embassy to the Cultural Agreements Fund.
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Popular Articles

Archaeology

Archaeologists uncover 4,200-year-old “zombie grave”

Archaeologists from the State Office for Monument Preservation and Archaeology Saxony-Anhalt have uncovered a "zombie grave" during excavations near Oppin, Germany.

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old clay token used by pilgrims

A clay token unearthed by the Temple Mount Sifting Project, is believed to have served pilgrims exchanging offerings during the Passover festival 2,000-years-ago.

Moon may have influenced Stonehenge construction

A study by a team of archaeoastronomers are investigating the possible connection of the moon in influencing the Stonehenge builders.

Archaeologists explore the resettlement history of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor

Archaeologists are conducting a study of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor to understand how one of the largest “megacities” of the Bronze Age was abandoned and then resettled.

Anthropology

Archaeologists find traces of violent history on Anglo-Scottish border

Archaeologists from the Border Reivers Archaeology Unit have uncovered traces of the violent history along the Anglo-Scottish border.

Collapse of Chavin culture was followed by a period of violence

A skeletal analysis has revealed that a period of violence followed the collapse of the Chavín culture in Peru.

Bacterial diseases were a lethal threat during the Stone Age

A new study has found that bacterial poisoning via food and water – but also direct contact such as kissing, was a lethal threat to people during the Stone Age in Scandinavia.

Europe’s largest mass grave found in Germany

Archaeologists from IN TERRA VERITAS have uncovered mass plague pits containing the remains of over 1,000 burials in southern Germany.

Palaeoanthropology

Study suggests that first humans came to Europe 1.4 million years ago

A new study led by the Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Institute of Archaeology of the CAS suggests that human occupation of Europe first took place 1.4 million years ago.

Early humans hunted beavers 400,000-years-ago

Researchers suggests that early humans were hunting, skinning, and eating beavers around 400,000-years-ago.

First modern humans in Europe are associated with the Gravettian culture

A study conducted by CNRS has determined who the first modern humans to settle in Europe were.

Archaeologists find 476,000-year-old wooden structure

Archaeologists from the University of Liverpool and Aberystwyth University have discovered a wooden structure dating from at least 476,000-years-ago, the earliest known example to date.

Heritage

Stone sphere among artefacts repatriated to Costa Rica

395 pre-Columbian artefacts have been repatriated to Costa Rica thanks to a grant by the United States Embassy to the Cultural Agreements Fund.

The Alaca Höyük meteoric dagger

The Alaca Höyük meteoric dagger is an iron forged dagger with extraterrestrial origins.

Ford Nucleon – The atomic-powered car

The Nucleon is an unrealised concept car designed by the Ford Motor Company in 1957.

The ancient tradition of barrow burials is being revived in England

A.W. Lymn The Family Funeral Service, has been granted permission to build the first and only modern barrow site in the East Midlands, England.

Mobile Application

The HeritageDaily application serves as a valuable resource for enthusiasts, students, academics, and professionals interested in exploring the diverse facets of our past.

Palaeontology

Archaeologists find an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks in Brazil

A study of the Serrote do Letreiro Site (meaning “Signpost Hill”) in Brazil’s Paraíba State has led to the discovery of an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks.

New discovery sheds light on the evolution of birds

Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Late Jurassic period, however, our knowledge of the initial stages of Avialae's evolution is limited due to a scarcity of Jurassic fossils.

World’s oldest ‘stomach stone’ fossil found on Jurassic Coast

Palaeontologists have discovered a 150-million-year-old stomach stone on England’s Jurassic Coast.

Predatory dinosaurs such as T. rex sported lizard-like lips

A new study suggests that predatory dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus rex, did not have permanently exposed teeth as depicted in films such as Jurassic Park, but instead had scaly, lizard-like lips covering and sealing their mouths.

Geology

Study analyses organic material from 3.5 billion-year-old biomass

Researchers from the University of Göttingen are using high resolution techniques to trace the origin and composition of a 3.5 billion-year-old biomass.

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

Study suggests that nature played a role in the origins of the Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature characterised by the combination of a human head and a lion's body.

Geological puzzle of lost continent of Argoland solved

Approximately 155 million years ago, a 5000 km piece of continent broke off from western Australia, leaving behind a basin hidden below the ocean known as the Argo Abyssal Plain.

Climate Change

Neolithic coastal settlements were resilient in the face of climate change

A study of the submerged site of Habonim North indicates that Neolithic coastal settlements were resilient in the face of climate change.

Climate change threatens thousands of Native American and colonial sites in coastal Georgia

Thousands of Native American and colonial sites in Georgia are under threat from increasing storm surges caused by climate change, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS One.

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

US Navy ships from WWII provide new climate evidence

Researchers have recovered the logbooks from US Navy ships stationed at Pearl Harbour, providing new evidence for understanding how the global climate is changing.

Natural History

Study reveals disease landscape of Ancient Egypt

A new study, published in the journal Advances in Parasitology, has conducted a meta-analysis of mummies to reveal new insights into the disease landscape of Ancient Egypt.

Greenland’s Paradise Valley

The Qinngua Valley, also known as Paradisdalen (meaning “paradise valley”) is a unique biome in southern Greenland and contains the island’s only natural forest zone.

Exotic horses used for jousting tournaments were buried in Westminster

The cemetery is located under Elverton Street, which was excavated by archaeologists in the 1990’s in advance of building works

Ancient tsunami wiped out prehistoric communities in Northern England

A study by the University of York has revealed that a tsunami wiped out prehistoric communities living in Northumberland, England, causing wide-scale depopulation across the region.

Travel

The Yangshan Quarry

The Yangshan Quarry is the site of an ancient limestone quarry, located to the east of Nanjing, China.

The Kizil Caves

The Kizil Caves, also known as Kizilgaha or Kizilgaha Caves, are a set of Buddhist rock-cut caves located near the Kizil Township in Baicheng County, Xinjiang, China.

Tomb of Qin Er Shi – The Second Emperor of China

Qin Er Shi, born Ying Huhai, was the second emperor of the Qin dynasty, the ruling family of a unified China - established by the first emperor, Qin Shi Huang.

Fort Drum – The Concrete Battleship

Fort Drum, nicknamed the "Concrete Battleship", is a fortified island situated at the mouth of Manila Bay in the Philippines.

The Pyramid Tombs of Libya

Several pyramidal necropolises exist in Libya from the reign of the Garamantes, a kingdom that emerged as a major regional power in the Sahara during the mid-2nd century AD.

Cave-In-Rock and America’s river pirates

Cave-In-Rock, also known as Murrell's Cave and Potato Cave, is a 17-metre-wide riverside cave located in the town of Cave-in-Rock, State of Illinois, United States.

Latest Articles

Archaeologists uncover 4,200-year-old “zombie grave”

Archaeologists from the State Office for Monument Preservation and Archaeology Saxony-Anhalt have uncovered a "zombie grave" during excavations near Oppin, Germany.

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old clay token used by pilgrims

A clay token unearthed by the Temple Mount Sifting Project, is believed to have served pilgrims exchanging offerings during the Passover festival 2,000-years-ago.

Moon may have influenced Stonehenge construction

A study by a team of archaeoastronomers are investigating the possible connection of the moon in influencing the Stonehenge builders.

Archaeologists explore the resettlement history of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor

Archaeologists are conducting a study of the Iron-Age metropolis of Tel Hazor to understand how one of the largest “megacities” of the Bronze Age was abandoned and then resettled.

Excavation uncovers possible traces of Villa Augustus at Somma Vesuviana

Archaeologists from the University of Tokyo have uncovered further evidence of the Villa of Augustus during excavations at Somma Vesuviana.

Study reveals new insights into wreck of royal flagship Gribshunden

Underwater archaeologists from Södertörn University, in collaboration with the CEMAS/Institute for Archaeology and Ancient Culture at Stockholm University, have conducted an investigation of the wreck of the royal flagship Gribshunden.

Mobile Application

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