Chemistry

Evidence of prehistoric glue used 20,000-years-ago during the Palaeolithic period

Researchers from UNED and the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) have found evidence of adhesives being used to fasten lithic hunting heads to arrow shafts approximately 20,000-years-ago.

Direct evidence of ancient Bronze Age drug use found in Menorca

Human consumption of mind-altering substances can be traced in the archaeological record back to prehistoric times; however, this is based on indirect evidence such as the typology and function of certain artefacts related to their preparation or consumption.

Shipwrecks reveal origins of metal used to cast the Benin Bronzes

The Benin Bronzes consist of thousands of metal sculptures and plaques which adorned the royal palace of the Kingdom of Benin, presently located in Edo State, Nigeria.

500-year-old medicine container has been revealed to contain herbal mixtures

A study of a cattle-horn used a medicine container, has been revealed to contain herbal mixtures used by the Khoi or San people 500 years ago.

Secrets of Ancient Egyptian mummification materials revealed

A new study, published in the journal Nature, has revealed the types of materials used in Ancient Egyptian mummification.

New research reveals what Ancient Egyptian faience has to do with gold

Researchers from the University of Warsaw, and the Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, have found that powdered quartz for the production of faience vessels from the ancient city of Athribis in the Nile Delta in Egypt, came from tailing heaps that remained after gold mining.

New study of Uluburun shipwreck reveals ancient trade network

 new study of the 3,000-year-old Uluburun shipwreck has revealed a complex ancient trading network during the Late Bronze Age.

New study on how Viking beadmakers recycled glass from Roman mosaics

A study published in the journal Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences reveals new manufacturing techniques on how craftsmen in Denmark recycled glass from Roman glass mosaics during the 8th century AD.

The world’s oldest mercury poisoning revealed in Copper Age Iberia

A recent paper published in the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology and in which researchers from the University of Seville participate, explores the complex relationship between humans and mercury over time.

Living Fossils: Microbe Discovered in Evolutionary Stasis for Millions of Years

It's like something out of science fiction. Research led by Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences has revealed that a group of microbes, which feed off chemical reactions triggered by radioactivity, have been at an evolutionary standstill for millions of years.

Medieval Containers Hint at Thriving Wine Trade in Islamic Sicily

Researchers at the University of York have found chemical residues of grapes in medieval containers indicating a prosperous wine trade in Islamic Sicily.

Organic Molecules Found in 3.5 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

A research team including the geobiologist Dr. Helge Missbach from the University of Cologne has detected organic molecules and gases trapped in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks.

Discovery Boosts Theory That Life on Earth Arose From RNA-DNA Mix

Chemists at Scripps Research have made a discovery that supports a surprising new view of how life originated on our planet.

A Non-Destructive Method for Analyzing Ancient Egyptian Embalming Materials

Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have found...

New chemical Analyses: What Did Danes And Italians in the Middle Ages Have in Common?

In the 1600s, two private chapels were erected as family burial sites for two noble families. One in the town Svendborg in Denmark, the other in Montella, Italy.

Chemical Analysis Reveals Egypt Was a Multi-Cultural Hub For Centuries

The Hyksos, who ruled during the 15th Dynasty of ancient Egypt, were not foreign invaders, but a group who rose to power from within, according to a study published by Chris Stantis of Bournemouth University, UK and colleagues.

Ocean changes almost starved life of oxygen 800 million years ago

Chemical changes in the oceans more than 800 million years ago almost destroyed the oxygen-rich atmosphere that paved the way for complex life on Earth, new research suggests.

Hydrogen energy at the root of life

Since the discovery of submarine hydrothermal vents around 40 years ago, these natural chemical reactors have been a focus for evolutionary researchers searching for the origin of life.

Scientific research will help to understand the origin of life in the universe

Until now, in the scientific community there has been the prevailing view that thermal processes associated exclusively with the combustion and high-temperature processing of organic raw materials such as oil, coal, wood, garbage, food, tobacco underpin the formation of PAHs.

Scientists tracking the ‘life signature’ of Britain

The British Geological Survey has just released a new interactive web tool that maps out the geographical variation in the isotope signatures of Britain.

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