Chemistry

Microbe X-32 – Is the Plasticene Era coming to an end?

Breaking, a new venture in collaboration with Harvard and the Wyss Institute, is claiming that a new discovery, Microbe X-32, can naturally break down polyolefins, polyesters, and polyamides in just 22 months.

Study finds evidence of Mesoamericans drinking tobacco during healing rituals

A new study, published in the journal Antiquity, has found traces of nicotine in ceramic vessels discovered at the ancient city of Cotzumalhuapa.

Evidence of prehistoric glue used 20,000-years-ago during the Palaeolithic period

Researchers from UNED and the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) have found evidence of adhesives being used to fasten lithic hunting heads to arrow shafts approximately 20,000-years-ago.

Direct evidence of ancient Bronze Age drug use found in Menorca

Human consumption of mind-altering substances can be traced in the archaeological record back to prehistoric times; however, this is based on indirect evidence such as the typology and function of certain artefacts related to their preparation or consumption.

Shipwrecks reveal origins of metal used to cast the Benin Bronzes

The Benin Bronzes consist of thousands of metal sculptures and plaques which adorned the royal palace of the Kingdom of Benin, presently located in Edo State, Nigeria.

Recreating alchemical recipes shows the genius of ancient scientists

From dragon's blood to slippery elm root, coded and obscure ingredients of ancient recipes are getting a second look today not by Harry Potter fans, but by historians who want to experience science as it was practiced centuries ago.

Chemical analysis reveals first cheese making in Northern Europe in the 6th millennium BC

The first unequivocal evidence that humans in prehistoric Northern Europe made cheese more than 7,000 years ago is described in research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, UK, published today in Nature.

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