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Curiosity rover on Mars finds clues to planets past buried in the rocks

Scientists studying chemical elements can piece together the history of a planet that once had the conditions necessary to support life.

Archaeologists excavate ancient city of Oxyrhynchus

Archaeologists from the University of Barcelona have been conducting excavations of the ancient city of Oxyrhynchus in Egypt.

Paleontologists Discover Solid Evidence of Formerly Elusive Abrupt Sea-level Jump

Meltwater pulses (MWPs) known as abrupt sea-level rise due to injection of melt water are of particular interests to scientists to investigate the interactions between climatic, oceanic and glacial systems.

Sticky tape: A key ingredient for mapping artifact origins

Researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Japan have demonstrated that combining a highly sensitive sulfur analysis technique with simple sulfur-free tape is an effective and harmless way to test extremely small samples of vermilion from artifacts that are thousands of years old.

Archaeologists analyse the composition of a Roman-era makeup case

A study carried out by researchers from the Merida Consortium, the University of Granada (UGR) and the Institute of Cultural Heritage of Spain has...

Existence of a prehistoric settlement in the south of Álava is confirmed

The magnetic survey carried out, between the end of September and the start of October, in the area “Los Cascajos” (Tobera, Berantevilla), directed by Andoni Tarriño, a geologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has confirmed the existence of a Neolithic-Chalcolithic settlement in the south of Álava, one of the few settlements of this chronology found to date in the País Vasco.

First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data

If you could travel back in time 100,000 years, you'd find yourself living among multiple groups of humans, including anatomically modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans.

Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves

Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a study released by an international team of archaeologists, anthropologists and neuroscientists of the Ba'ja Neolithic Project.

Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization’s decline

Cambodia’s famous temple of Angkor Wat is one of the world’s largest religious monuments, visited by over 2 million tourists each year.

Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

Researchers from the University of Huddersfield, with colleagues from the University of Cambridge and the University of Minho in Braga, have been using a genetic approach to tackle one of the most intractable questions of all - how and when we became truly human.

Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge

Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain - with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals.

Changes in rat size reveal habitat of ‘Hobbit’ hominin

A study of rat body sizes shifting over time gives a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis -- nicknamed the "Hobbit" due to its diminutive stature.

Solving the ancient mysteries of Easter Island

he ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, Chile) built their famous ahu monuments near coastal freshwater sources, according to a team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

An ancient strain of plague may have led to the decline of Neolithic Europeans

A team of researchers from France, Sweden, and Denmark have identified a new strain of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria that causes plague, in DNA...

Siberian ‘unicorns’ extinct much later than believed

Giant prehistoric 'unicorns' once wandered over the prairies of Central Asia. New research has shown that these so-called Siberian unicorns lived much longer than was believed, and probably did not become extinct until 'just' 39,000 years ago.