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Ancient DNA reveals new insights into prehistoric Log Coffin culture

The Log Coffin culture emerged during the Iron Age in the highlands of Pang Mapha, northwestern Thailand.

Study reveals new genetics insights into inhabitants of Teōtīhuacān

A new genetic study has used the latest DNA sequencing techniques to reveal the entire mitochondrial genome sequences of the ancient Teōtīhuacāns.

Genetic analysis of baboons provides evidence that ancient Punt and Adulis were the same place

In Ancient Egypt, the hamadryas baboon was one of the animals that represented Thoth, the god of the Moon, wisdom, knowledge, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art and judgment.

New study suggests that prehistoric women were hunters too

According to a study published in Scientific American and the journal American Anthropologist, women were also hunters during the palaeolithic period.

Genome study reveals that Iceman Ötzi had dark skin and male pattern baldness

Ötzi, also known as the Iceman, is a naturally mummified human who lived between 3350 and 3105 BC.

Ancient DNA reveals the world’s oldest family tree

Analysis of ancient DNA from one of the best-preserved Neolithic tombs in Britain has revealed that most of the people buried there were from five continuous generations of a single extended family.

Genetic study on the origins of the Tarim Basin mummies

Buried in boat coffins in an otherwise barren desert, the Tarim Basin mummies have long puzzled scientists and inspired numerous theories as to their enigmatic origins.

Human paleofeces suggests prehistoric salt miners drank beer and ate blue cheese

A study of paleofeces in prehistoric salt mines in Austria suggests that miners drank beer and ate blue cheese 2,700 years ago.

Neandertal and Denisovan blood groups deciphered

Blood group analyses for three Neandertals and one Denisovan by a team from the Anthropologie Bio-Culturelle, Droit, Éthique et Santé research unit (CNRS / Aix-Marseille University / EFS) confirm hypotheses concerning their African origin, Eurasian dispersal, and interbreeding with early Homo sapiens.

Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains

The cave of Satsurblia was inhabited by humans in different periods of the Paleolithic: Up to date a single human individual dated from 15,000 years ago has been sequenced from that site. No other human remains have been discovered in the older layers of the cave.

Researchers use genetic and isotopic data to investigate human mobility at Bronze Age city of Alalakh

The Bronze Age in the eastern Mediterranean has long been considered by researchers to have been the 'first international age,' especially the period from 1600-1200 BC, when powerful empires from Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Egypt set up large networks of subordinate client kingdoms in the Near East.

New method could reveal what genes we might have inherited from Neanderthals

Thousands of years ago, archaic humans such as Neanderthals and Denisovans went extinct. But before that, they interbred with the ancestors of present-day humans, who still to this day carry genetic mutations from the extinct species.

Ten years of ancient genome analysis has taught scientists ‘what it means to be human’

A ball of 4,000-year-old hair frozen in time tangled around a whalebone comb led to the first ever reconstruction of an ancient human genome just over a decade ago.

Bronze Age migrations changed societal organisation and genomic landscape in Italy

A new study from the Institute of Genomics of the University of Tartu, Estonia has shed light on the genetic prehistory of populations in modern day Italy through the analysis of ancient human individuals during the Chalcolithic/Bronze Age transition around 4,000 years ago.

200-year-old poop shows rural elites in New England had parasitic infections

In the early 19th century in North America, parasitic infections were quite common in urban areas due in part to population growth and urbanization.

Recolonisation of Europe after the last ice age started earlier than previously thought

A study that appeared today on Current Biology sheds new light on the continental migrations which shaped the genetic background of all present Europeans.

Ancient Genomes Trace the Origin & Decline of the Scythians

Because of their interactions and conflicts with the major contemporaneous civilizations of Eurasia, the Scythians enjoy a legendary status in historiography and popular culture.

The Human Brain Grew as a Result of the Extinction of Large Animals

A new paper by Dr. Miki Ben-Dor and Prof. Ran Barkai from the Jacob M. Alkow Department of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University proposes an original unifying explanation for the physiological, behavioral and cultural evolution of the human species, from its first appearance about two million years ago, to the agricultural revolution (around 10,000 BCE).

Disease Tolerance: Skeletons Reveal Humans Evolved to Fight Pathogens

A new skeleton study is reconstructing ancient pandemics to assess human's evolutionary ability to fight off leprosy, tuberculosis and treponematoses, with help from declining rates of transmission when the germs became widespread.

Neanderthals’ Faecal Sediments Reveals How Gut Microbiota Benefits Our Health

Neanderthals'' gut microbiota already included some beneficial micro-organisms that are also found in our own intestine.

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