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Scientists’ warning to humanity on insect extinctions

SOME of the tiniest creatures on the planet are vital for the environment. But there is a worldwide fall in insect numbers after an accelerating rate of extinction.

Innovative birds are less vulnerable to extinction

Bird species that have the capacity to express novel foraging behaviours are less vulnerable to extinction than species that do not, according to a collaborative study involving McGill University and CREAF Barcelona and published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Invasive species with charisma have it easier

It's the outside that counts: Their charisma has an impact on the introduction and image of alien species and can even hinder their control.

Cold War nuclear bomb tests reveal true age of whale sharks

The radioactive legacy of the arms race solves a mystery about the world's largest fish.

Citizen science helps report ecosystem changes during the lockdown in Venice

The current unforeseeable situation offers scientists an undesired, albeit unique opportunity to study the relationship between humans and the environment.

Scientists discover a new class of taste receptors

Evolution is a tinkerer, not an engineer. "Evolution does not produce novelties from scratch. It works with what already exists," wrote Nobel laureate François Jacob in 1977, and biologists continue to find this to be true.

About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet

Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study headed by Marius Roesti of the University of Bern is challenging a long-standing explanation for.

Landmark study concludes marine life can be rebuilt by 2050

An international study recently published in the journal Nature, lays out the essential roadmap of actions required for the planet's marine life to recover to full abundance by 2050.

Natural light flicker can help prevent detection

Movement breaks camouflage, making it risky for anything trying to hide. New research has shown that dynamic features common in many natural habitats, such as moving light patterns, can reduce being located when moving.