Home Anthropology

Anthropology

Advertisment

Study shows human ancestors could have consumed hard plant tissues without damaging their teeth

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors' diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis.

Study puts the ‘Carib’ in ‘Caribbean,’ boosting credibility of Columbus’ cannibal claims

Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include harrowing descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men - stories long dismissed as myths.

Otago scientist excavates medieval Uzbek cemetery

An Otago scientist has been digging up human remains in the backyards of Uzbek villagers to discover how people lived in the Middle Ages.

Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago.

Study reveals that humans migrated from Europe to the Levant 40,000 years ago

Who exactly were the Aurignacians, who lived in the Levant 40,000 years ago? Researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Israel Antiquities Authority, and Ben-Gurion...

Ancient bone protein reveals which turtles were on the menu in Florida, Caribbean

Thousands of years ago, the inhabitants of modern-day Florida and the Caribbean feasted on sea turtles, leaving behind bones that tell tales of ancient diets and the ocean's past.

DNA study sheds new light on the people of the Neolithic battle axe culture

In an interdisciplinary study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, an international research team has combined archaeological, genetic and stable isotope data to understand the demographic processes associated with the iconic Battle Axe Culture and its introduction in Scandinavia.

Preserving old bones with modern technology

A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free.

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine

Scientific analysis of dental calculus - plaque build-up - of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs.