Climate Change

Neolithic coastal settlements were resilient in the face of climate change

A study of the submerged site of Habonim North indicates that Neolithic coastal settlements were resilient in the face of climate change.

Climate change threatens thousands of Native American and colonial sites in coastal Georgia

Thousands of Native American and colonial sites in Georgia are under threat from increasing storm surges caused by climate change, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS One.

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

US Navy ships from WWII provide new climate evidence

Researchers have recovered the logbooks from US Navy ships stationed at Pearl Harbour, providing new evidence for understanding how the global climate is changing.

Extreme cooling caused extinction of early humans in Europe

Study led by the University College London (UCL) suggests that an extreme cooling period approximately 1.1 million years ago likely contributed to the extinction of early human populations in Europe.

Biodiversity devastation: Human-driven decline requires millions of years of recovery

A new study shows that the current rate of biodiversity decline in freshwater ecosystems outcompetes that at the end-Cretaceous extinction that killed the dinosaurs: damage now being done in decades to centuries may take millions of years to undo.

The ‘Great Dying’

The Paleozoic era culminated 251.9 million years ago in the most severe mass extinction recorded in the geologic record.

Did Earth’s early rise in oxygen help multicellular life evolve?

Scientists have long thought that there was a direct connection between the rise in atmospheric oxygen, which started with the Great Oxygenation Event 2.5 billion years ago, and the rise of large, complex multicellular organisms.

Climate crises in Mesopotamia prompted the first stable forms of State

During the Bronze Age, Mesopotamia was witness to several climate crises. In the long run, these crises prompted the development of stable forms of State and therefore elicited cooperation between political elites and non-elites.

Human land use wasn’t always at nature’s expense

Nearly three-quarters of Earth's land had been transformed by humans by 10,000 BC, but new research shows it largely wasn't at the expense of the natural world.

Poop Core Records 4,300 Years of Bat Diet And Environment

Deep in a Jamaican cave is a treasure trove of bat poop, deposited in sequential layers by generations of bats over 4,300 years.

The Melting of Large Icebergs is a Key Stage in the Evolution of Ice Ages

A new study, in which the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (IACT) (CSIC-UGR) participated, has described for the first time a key stage in the beginning of the great glaciations and indicates that it can happen to our planet in the future.

Ancient Kauri Trees Points to a Turning Point in Earth’s History 42,000 Years Ago

The temporary breakdown of Earth's magnetic field 42,000 years ago sparked major climate shifts that led to global environmental change and mass extinctions, a new international study co-led by UNSW Sydney and the South Australian Museum shows.

Geologists Produce New Timeline of Earth’s Paleozoic Climate Changes

The temperature of a planet is linked with the diversity of life that it can support. MIT geologists have now reconstructed a timeline of the Earth's temperature during the early Paleozoic era, between 510 and 440 million years ago -- a pivotal period when animals became abundant in a previously microbe-dominated world.

A Lost Paradise in the Sahara Desert

Large parts of today's Sahara Desert were green thousands of years ago. Prehistoric engravings of giraffes and crocodiles testify to this, as does a stone-age cave painting in the desert that even shows swimming humans.

Climate Change in Antiquity: Mass Emigration Due to Water Scarcity

The absence of monsoon rains at the source of the Nile was the cause of migrations and the demise of entire settlements in the late Roman province of Egypt.

Major Drought in Middle Ages Could Have Parallels to Climate Change Today

The transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age was apparently accompanied by severe droughts between 1302 and 1307 in Europe; this preceded the wet and cold phase of the 1310s and the resulting great famine of 1315-21.

Volcanic Eruptions Directly Triggered Ocean Acidification During Early Cretaceous

Around 120 million years ago, the earth experienced an extreme environmental disruption that choked oxygen from its oceans.

Climate Change Caused Demise of Central Asia’s River Civilizations, Not Genghis Khan

A new study challenges the long-held view that the destruction of Central Asia's medieval river civilizations was a direct result of the Mongol invasion in the early 13th century AD.

Newly Discovered Fossils Prove ‘Shangri-La’-Like Ecosystem in Central Tibet

Despite decades of investigation, Tibet's ancient topography and its role in climatic and biotic evolution remain speculative due to a paucity of quantitative surface height measurements through time and space, and sparse fossil records.

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