9,000-year-old Neolithic stone mask unveiled

A rare stone mask from the Neolithic period has been unveiled for the first time by the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Archaeologists recover two medieval grave slabs from submerged shipwreck

Underwater archaeologists from Bournemouth University have recovered two medieval grave slabs from a shipwreck off the coast of Dorset, England.

Study confirms palace of King Ghezo was site of voodoo blood rituals

A study, published in the journal Proteomics, presents new evidence to suggest that voodoo blood rituals were performed at the palace of King Ghezo.

Archaeologists search for home of infamous Tower of London prisoner

A team of archaeologists are searching for the home of Sir Arthur Haselrig, a leader of the Parliamentary opposition to Charles I, and whose attempted arrest sparked the English Civil War.

Tartessian plaque depicting warrior scenes found near Guareña

Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology of Mérida (IAM) and the CSIC have uncovered a slate plaque depicting warrior scenes at the Casas del Turuñuelo archaeological site.

Archaeologists find a necropolis of stillborn babies

Excavations by the National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) have unearthed a necropolis for stillborn and young children in the historic centre of Auxerre, France.

Researchers find historic wreck of the USS “Hit ‘em HARDER”

The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) has confirmed the discovery of the USS Harder (SS 257), an historic US submarine from WWII.

Archaeologists uncover Roman traces of Vibo Valentia

Archaeologists from the Superintendent of Archaeology Fine Arts and Landscape have made several major discoveries during excavations of Roman Vibo Valentia at the Urban Archaeological Park.
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Archaeology

9,000-year-old Neolithic stone mask unveiled

A rare stone mask from the Neolithic period has been unveiled for the first time by the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Archaeologists recover two medieval grave slabs from submerged shipwreck

Underwater archaeologists from Bournemouth University have recovered two medieval grave slabs from a shipwreck off the coast of Dorset, England.

Study confirms palace of King Ghezo was site of voodoo blood rituals

A study, published in the journal Proteomics, presents new evidence to suggest that voodoo blood rituals were performed at the palace of King Ghezo.

Archaeologists search for home of infamous Tower of London prisoner

A team of archaeologists are searching for the home of Sir Arthur Haselrig, a leader of the Parliamentary opposition to Charles I, and whose attempted arrest sparked the English Civil War.

Anthropology

Infant burials found under prehistoric “dragon stone”

A study, published in the journal Science Direct, has revealed the discovery of two infant burials beneath a prehistoric “dragon stone” in Armenia.

Female burial found among 23 warrior monks of the Order of Calatrava in Guadalajara

A study led by archaeologists from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) and the Max Planck Institute has found a female burial among the remains of 23 warrior monks of the Order of Calatrava in Guadalajara.

Cut marks on an Ancient Egyptian skull may indicate early attempts at cancer treatment

According to a study published in the journal Frontiers in Medicine, cut marks found on a 4,000-year-old skull could be indications that the Ancient Egyptians tried to treat cancer.

BU archaeologists uncover Iron Age victim of human sacrifice

Archaeologists from Bournemouth University have uncovered an Iron Age victim of human sacrifice in Dorset, England.

Palaeoanthropology

Study suggests human occupation in Patagonia prior to the Younger Dryas period

Archaeologists have conducted a study of lithic material from the Pilauco and Los Notros sites in north-western Patagonia, revealing evidence of human occupation in the region prior to the Younger Dryas period.

Study suggests that first humans came to Europe 1.4 million years ago

A new study led by the Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Institute of Archaeology of the CAS suggests that human occupation of Europe first took place 1.4 million years ago.

Early humans hunted beavers 400,000-years-ago

Researchers suggests that early humans were hunting, skinning, and eating beavers around 400,000-years-ago.

First modern humans in Europe are associated with the Gravettian culture

A study conducted by CNRS has determined who the first modern humans to settle in Europe were.

Heritage

Explorers find lost plane of WWII fighter ace

A team of explorers from Pacific Wrecks have discovered the lost plane of WWII ace pilot, Richard Bong.

Soldiers’ graffiti depicting hangings found on door at Dover Castle

Conservation of a Georgian door at Dover Castle has revealed etchings depicting hangings and graffiti from time of French Revolution.

Bronze Age treasures stolen from Ely Museum

Thieves have broken into Ely Museum and stolen historical treasures dating from the Bronze Age.

Þjóðveldisbærinn Stöng – Iceland’s Pompeii

In 1104, Hekla, a fissure stratovolcano in the south of Iceland erupted violently with a VEI of 5, covering over 55,000 km2 (roughly half of Iceland) in a layer of rhyodacitic tephra.

Mobile Application

The HeritageDaily application serves as a valuable resource for enthusiasts, students, academics, and professionals interested in exploring the diverse facets of our past.

Palaeontology

Archaeologists find an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks in Brazil

A study of the Serrote do Letreiro Site (meaning “Signpost Hill”) in Brazil’s Paraíba State has led to the discovery of an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks.

New discovery sheds light on the evolution of birds

Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Late Jurassic period, however, our knowledge of the initial stages of Avialae's evolution is limited due to a scarcity of Jurassic fossils.

World’s oldest ‘stomach stone’ fossil found on Jurassic Coast

Palaeontologists have discovered a 150-million-year-old stomach stone on England’s Jurassic Coast.

Predatory dinosaurs such as T. rex sported lizard-like lips

A new study suggests that predatory dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus rex, did not have permanently exposed teeth as depicted in films such as Jurassic Park, but instead had scaly, lizard-like lips covering and sealing their mouths.

Geology

Study analyses organic material from 3.5 billion-year-old biomass

Researchers from the University of Göttingen are using high resolution techniques to trace the origin and composition of a 3.5 billion-year-old biomass.

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

Study suggests that nature played a role in the origins of the Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature characterised by the combination of a human head and a lion's body.

Geological puzzle of lost continent of Argoland solved

Approximately 155 million years ago, a 5000 km piece of continent broke off from western Australia, leaving behind a basin hidden below the ocean known as the Argo Abyssal Plain.

Climate Change

Study suggests Seahenge was built to control climate change

A recent study published in GeoJournal proposes that Seahenge was built to conduct rituals aimed at prolonging the summer during the extreme climatic changes of the 3rd millennium BC.

Study uncovers new evidence supporting Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH) proposes that a cometary or meteoric body exploded over the North American area sometime around 12,900-years-ago.

Pleistocene hunter-gatherers settled in Cyprus thousands of years earlier than previously thought

Archaeologists have found that Pleistocene hunter-gatherers settled in Cyprus thousands of years earlier than previously thought.

Underwater scans reveal lost submerged landscape

Researchers from the Life on the Edge project, a collaboration between the University of Bradford and the University of Split, has revealed a lost submerged landscape off the coast of Croatia using underwater scans.

Natural History

Study identifies a succession of climatic changes one million years ago in Europe

A study of the Quibas site in Murcia, Spain, has revealed new data to suggest that one million years ago there was a succession of climatic changes in Europe.

Red squirrels spread leprosy during medieval period

A study of archaeological sites in Winchester, England, has revealed that red squirrels served as a host for Mycobacterium leprae strains that caused leprosy in people.

Study reveals disease landscape of Ancient Egypt

A new study, published in the journal Advances in Parasitology, has conducted a meta-analysis of mummies to reveal new insights into the disease landscape of Ancient Egypt.

Greenland’s Paradise Valley

The Qinngua Valley, also known as Paradisdalen (meaning “paradise valley”) is a unique biome in southern Greenland and contains the island’s only natural forest zone.

Travel

The Yangshan Quarry

The Yangshan Quarry is the site of an ancient limestone quarry, located to the east of Nanjing, China.

The Kizil Caves

The Kizil Caves, also known as Kizilgaha or Kizilgaha Caves, are a set of Buddhist rock-cut caves located near the Kizil Township in Baicheng County, Xinjiang, China.

Tomb of Qin Er Shi – The Second Emperor of China

Qin Er Shi, born Ying Huhai, was the second emperor of the Qin dynasty, the ruling family of a unified China - established by the first emperor, Qin Shi Huang.

Fort Drum – The Concrete Battleship

Fort Drum, nicknamed the "Concrete Battleship", is a fortified island situated at the mouth of Manila Bay in the Philippines.

The Pyramid Tombs of Libya

Several pyramidal necropolises exist in Libya from the reign of the Garamantes, a kingdom that emerged as a major regional power in the Sahara during the mid-2nd century AD.

Cave-In-Rock and America’s river pirates

Cave-In-Rock, also known as Murrell's Cave and Potato Cave, is a 17-metre-wide riverside cave located in the town of Cave-in-Rock, State of Illinois, United States.

Latest Articles

The Study of Human Remains: What does it really tell us? Part 2

The sex of an individual is especially important in determining a pattern within a society. A pattern of anything; death rate for males versus females, infanticide of males or females, common societal pathologies for each sex and so on.

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