Tech & Engineering

Archaeologists use revolutionary GPR robot to explore Viking Age site

Archaeologist from NIKU are using a revolutionary new GPR robot to explore a Viking Age site in Norway’s Sandefjord municipality.

Ford Nucleon – The atomic-powered car

The Nucleon is an unrealised concept car designed by the Ford Motor Company in 1957.

Lasers are mapping Scotland’s subterranean Iron Age structures

Archaeologists from AOC Archaeology have been using lasers to map subterranean Iron Age structures, such as the Cracknie Souterrain, an Iron Age passageway in the Borgie Forest, Scotland.

Dedicated archaeology community launches on Mastodon

Whilst Twitter appears to be going extinct with all the turmoil and public drama, a new haven for archaeology has been launched on the social network, Mastodon.

Gold from ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin

Scientists, using an innovative mobile laser method have determined that gold found in ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin.

Sound of an Egyptian mummy heard again for first time in 3,000 years

The sound of a mummified priest has been heard for the first time in 3,000 years, thanks to ingenious research by academics at Royal Holloway, University of London, University of York and Leeds Museum and Galleries.

Imaging uncovers secrets of medicine’s mysterious ivory manikins

Little is known about the origins of manikins--small anatomical sculptures thought to be used by doctors four centuries ago--but now advanced imaging techniques have offered a revealing glimpse inside these captivating ivory dolls.

‘Ghost’ footprints from Pleistocene era revealed by radar tech CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Invisible footprints hiding since the end of the last ice age - and what lies beneath them - have been discovered by Cornell University researchers using a special type of radar in a novel way.

Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago.

2,000-year-old Herculaneum Scrolls from Institut de France being studied using UK’s Synchrotron, Diamond Light Source

Researchers led by the renowned ancient artefacts decoder, Professor Brent Seales, will be using Diamond, the UK’s national synchrotron science facility in the heart of Oxfordshire, to examine a collection of world-famous ancient artefacts owned by the Institut de France.

Elon Musk’s Starship may be more moral catastrophe than bold step in space exploration

Elon Musk, founder of private space-faring company SpaceX, recently unveiled his new Starship craft. Amazingly, it is designed to carry up to 100 crew members on interplanetary journeys...

Archaeology at BESSY II

The first thing that catches an archaeologist's eye on the small piece of papyrus from Elephantine Island on the Nile is the apparently blank patch.

Nuclear physics in search of world artifacts

Scientists have published the first results of a "scan" obtained by the method of muon radiography of the underground space in the Derbent fortress of Naryn-Kala.

An underwater vehicle to explore abandoned mine sites

An international team of researchers, including researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), is developing a new tool that will allow researchers to explore and assess mines in order to find out if it is economically viable to re-open them.

Planet Knowledge available on Youview and Freeview

Planet Knowledge, the free to watch video on demand channel is available to UK audiences on Youview and Freeview.

Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods

Flinders University archaeologists are using cutting edge subsurface imaging technology to help assist community groups map unmarked graves and manage their cultural heritage.

Uncovering the secrets of ancient rock art using ‘X-ray vision’

Prehistoric rock paintings are a source of fascination across the world. Aside from their beauty, there's deep meaning in these strokes, which depict ancient rituals and important symbols.

The sword of a Hispano-Muslim warlord is digitized in 3D

At age 90, Ali Atar, one of the main military chiefs of King Boabdil of Granada, fought to his death in the Battle of Lucena in 1483.

‘X-ray gun’ helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck

About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea off the coast of the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia.

Using new technology to find shipwrecks on the ocean floor

Throughout the centuries ships have weathered wars, storms, icebergs, and pirates, to name a few. Many ships have been lost in the face of these forces and gone down with all hands.

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