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Astronaut urine to build moon bases

The modules that the major space agencies plan to erect on the Moon could incorporate an element contributed by the human colonizers themselves: the urea in their pee.

New material developed could help clean energy revolution

Fuel cells and water electrolyzers that are cheap and efficient will form the cornerstone of a hydrogen fuel based economy, which is one of the most promising clean and sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels.

Towards an unhackable quantum internet

A quantum internet could be used to send unhackable messages, improve the accuracy of GPS, and enable cloud-based quantum computing.

A pigment from ancient Egypt to modern microscopy

Egyptian blue is one of the oldest manmade colour pigments. It adorns, for instance, the crown of the world famous bust of Nefertiti.

Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could ‘rewrite’ ancient events

Radiocarbon dating, invented in the late 1940s and improved ever since to provide more precise measurements, is the standard method for determining the dates of artifacts in archaeology and other disciplines.

Nanostructured rubber-like material could replace human tissue

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have created a new, rubber-like material with a unique set of properties, which could act as a replacement for human tissue in medical procedures.

Seismic imaging technology could deliver finely detailed images of the human brain

Scientists have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves.

Our digital afterlife

Social media pages and accounts often turn into memorials when someone dies, giving people a chance to still feel connected to those they've lost.

Sound of an Egyptian mummy heard again for first time in 3,000 years

The sound of a mummified priest has been heard for the first time in 3,000 years, thanks to ingenious research by academics at Royal Holloway, University of London, University of York and Leeds Museum and Galleries.

Imaging uncovers secrets of medicine’s mysterious ivory manikins

Little is known about the origins of manikins--small anatomical sculptures thought to be used by doctors four centuries ago--but now advanced imaging techniques have offered a revealing glimpse inside these captivating ivory dolls.

‘Ghost’ footprints from Pleistocene era revealed by radar tech CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Invisible footprints hiding since the end of the last ice age - and what lies beneath them - have been discovered by Cornell University researchers using a special type of radar in a novel way.

Scientists explore Egyptian mummy bones with x-rays and infrared light

Experiments at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are casting a new light on Egyptian soil and ancient mummified bone samples that could provide a richer understanding of daily life and environmental conditions thousands of years ago.