Tech & Engineering

Archaeologists use revolutionary GPR robot to explore Viking Age site

Archaeologist from NIKU are using a revolutionary new GPR robot to explore a Viking Age site in Norway’s Sandefjord municipality.

Ford Nucleon – The atomic-powered car

The Nucleon is an unrealised concept car designed by the Ford Motor Company in 1957.

Lasers are mapping Scotland’s subterranean Iron Age structures

Archaeologists from AOC Archaeology have been using lasers to map subterranean Iron Age structures, such as the Cracknie Souterrain, an Iron Age passageway in the Borgie Forest, Scotland.

Dedicated archaeology community launches on Mastodon

Whilst Twitter appears to be going extinct with all the turmoil and public drama, a new haven for archaeology has been launched on the social network, Mastodon.

Gold from ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin

Scientists, using an innovative mobile laser method have determined that gold found in ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin.

Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas

Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation. However, fossil fuels are both unsustainable and unsafe, serving as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and leading to adverse respiratory effects and devastation due to global warming.

A cheap organic steam generator to purify water

It has been estimated that in 2040 a quarter of the world's children will live in regions where clean and drinkable water is lacking.

3D printing and moon dust: an astronaut’s kit for future space exploration?

One of the major challenges related to space exploration is the development of production technologies capable of exploiting the few resources available in extra-terrestrial environment.

Innovative Technologies for Satellites

Some satellites are only slightly larger than a milk carton.

Using insect wings for improved medical implants

Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial...

Scientists develop ‘backpack’ computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats

To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild.

On Mars or Earth, biohybrid can turn carbon dioxide into new products

If humans ever hope to colonize Mars, the settlers will need to manufacture on-planet a huge range of organic compounds, from fuels to drugs, that are too expensive to ship from Earth.

Astronaut urine to build moon bases

The modules that the major space agencies plan to erect on the Moon could incorporate an element contributed by the human colonizers themselves: the urea in their pee.

New material developed could help clean energy revolution

Fuel cells and water electrolyzers that are cheap and efficient will form the cornerstone of a hydrogen fuel based economy, which is one of the most promising clean and sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels.

Towards an unhackable quantum internet

A quantum internet could be used to send unhackable messages, improve the accuracy of GPS, and enable cloud-based quantum computing.

A pigment from ancient Egypt to modern microscopy

Egyptian blue is one of the oldest manmade colour pigments. It adorns, for instance, the crown of the world famous bust of Nefertiti.

Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could ‘rewrite’ ancient events

Radiocarbon dating, invented in the late 1940s and improved ever since to provide more precise measurements, is the standard method for determining the dates of artifacts in archaeology and other disciplines.

Nanostructured rubber-like material could replace human tissue

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have created a new, rubber-like material with a unique set of properties, which could act as a replacement for human tissue in medical procedures.

Seismic imaging technology could deliver finely detailed images of the human brain

Scientists have developed a new computational technique that could lead to fast, finely detailed brain imaging with a compact device that uses only sound waves.

Our digital afterlife

Social media pages and accounts often turn into memorials when someone dies, giving people a chance to still feel connected to those they've lost.

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