Tech & Engineering

Archaeologists use revolutionary GPR robot to explore Viking Age site

Archaeologist from NIKU are using a revolutionary new GPR robot to explore a Viking Age site in Norway’s Sandefjord municipality.

Ford Nucleon – The atomic-powered car

The Nucleon is an unrealised concept car designed by the Ford Motor Company in 1957.

Lasers are mapping Scotland’s subterranean Iron Age structures

Archaeologists from AOC Archaeology have been using lasers to map subterranean Iron Age structures, such as the Cracknie Souterrain, an Iron Age passageway in the Borgie Forest, Scotland.

Dedicated archaeology community launches on Mastodon

Whilst Twitter appears to be going extinct with all the turmoil and public drama, a new haven for archaeology has been launched on the social network, Mastodon.

Gold from ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin

Scientists, using an innovative mobile laser method have determined that gold found in ancient Troy, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin.

New 10 second sourcing technology set to transform archaeology

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed a method of sourcing obsidian artefacts that takes only 10 seconds – dozens of times faster than the current methods – with a handheld instrument that can be used at archaeological excavations.

Micro Plasma source may revolutionize how archaeologists date objects in the field

A team of researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden has designed a microplasma source capable of exciting matter in a controlled, efficient way. This miniature device may find use in a wide range of applications in harsh environments, but can also help revolutionize archaeology.

Tudor sculptures reassembled with help from 3D scanning

University of Leicester experts have tried to recreate two Tudor monuments using a mixture of humanities research and scientific technology.

Ancient glass beads provide evidence of industry and trade routes at the time of the Romans

Scientists at Mainz University for the first time prove techniques used to produce ancient glazed beads / Investigations conducted using neutron activation analysis with the aid of the TRIGA research reactor

Archaeology technique gives insight into day before death

The day before the child's death was not a pleasant one, because it was not a sudden injury that killed the 10-13 year old child who was buried in the medieval town of Ribe in Denmark 800 years ago. The day before death was full of suffering because the child had been given a large dose of mercury in an attempt to cure a severe illness.

‘Digging up’ 4-billion-year-old fossil protein structures to reveal how they evolved

Modern proteins exhibit an impressive degree of structural diversity, which has been well characterized, but very little is known about how and when over the course of evolution 3D protein structures arose.

Experts create 3D map of Richard III’s grave

University of Leicester experts are combining two scanning techniques to create a highly-detailed 3D reconstruction of Richard III’s grave.

New archaeogenetic research refutes earlier findings

WHEN did modern humans settle in Asia and what route did they take from mankind’s African homeland? A University of Huddersfield professor has helped to provide answers to both questions. But he has also had to settle a controversy.

Monkey teeth help reveal Neanderthal weaning

Most modern human mothers wean their babies much earlier than our closest primate relatives. But what about our extinct relatives, the Neanderthals?

Secret streets of Britain’s Atlantis are revealed

A University of Southampton professor has carried out the most detailed analysis ever of the archaeological remains of the lost medieval town of Dunwich, dubbed ‘Britain’s Atlantis’.

Stanford-led research pushes back origins of agriculture in China by 12,000 years

The discovery pushes back the roots of agriculture in China by 12,000 years. The global emergence of similar practices around 23,000 years ago hints that agriculture evolved independently around the world, perhaps as a response to climate change.

A High-Tech Look at Ancient Civilizations

The Italian farmer resolutely tilling his soil may have no idea he's standing atop the remains of an ancient villa. But seated at his desk at Duke University, Maurizio Forte knows. Using satellite photos and high-tech imaging technology, he can see what the farmer cannot. And this semester, his students are creating a virtual replica of the hidden villa.

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