Anthropology

Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered in Malmesbury

Archaeologists have discovered an Anglo-Saxon cemetery in the grounds of the Old Bell Hotel in Malmesbury, England.

Infant burials found under prehistoric “dragon stone”

A study, published in the journal Science Direct, has revealed the discovery of two infant burials beneath a prehistoric “dragon stone” in Armenia.

Female burial found among 23 warrior monks of the Order of Calatrava in Guadalajara

A study led by archaeologists from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) and the Max Planck Institute has found a female burial among the remains of 23 warrior monks of the Order of Calatrava in Guadalajara.

Cut marks on an Ancient Egyptian skull may indicate early attempts at cancer treatment

According to a study published in the journal Frontiers in Medicine, cut marks found on a 4,000-year-old skull could be indications that the Ancient Egyptians tried to treat cancer.

BU archaeologists uncover Iron Age victim of human sacrifice

Archaeologists from Bournemouth University have uncovered an Iron Age victim of human sacrifice in Dorset, England.

A relative from the Tianyuan Cave

Ancient DNA has revealed that humans living some 40,000 years ago in the area near Beijing were likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans

What did our ancestors look like?

A new method of establishing hair and eye colour from modern forensic samples can also be used to identify details from ancient human remains, finds a new study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Investigative Genetics.

Most of the harmful mutations in people arose in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years

A study dating the age of more than 1 million single-letter variations in the human DNA code reveals that most of these mutations are of recent origin, evolutionarily speaking. These kinds of mutations change one nucleotide – an A, C, T or G – in the DNA sequence. Over 86 percent of the harmful protein-coding mutations of this type arose in humans just during the past 5,000 to 10,000 years.

Skeletons in cave reveal Mediterranean secrets

Skeletal remains in an island cave in Favignana, Italy, reveal that modern humans first settled in Sicily around the time of the last ice age and despite living on Mediterranean islands, ate little seafood. The research is published November 28 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Marcello Mannino and colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany.

The Study of Human Remains: What does it really tell us? Part 1

The study of human remains can tell us a great deal about a society; status, wealth, religion and others. When an archaeologist studies one set of human remains, he is seeking specific information about that one person

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