Anthropology

Wessex Archaeology finds Anglo-Saxon cemetery

Wessex Archaeology has uncovered an Anglo-Saxon cemetery during excavations for Viking Link, a submarine power cable connecting the United Kingdom and Denmark.

Rich array of funerary offerings found in burials at Cima de San José

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have uncovered numerous funerary offerings among 48 burials at Cima de San José.

Dentistry during Viking Age was surprisingly advanced

Dentistry during Viking Age was surprisingly advanced, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Gothenburg.

Archaeologists analyse medieval benefits system

Archaeologists from the University of Leicester have conducted a study in the main cemetery of the hospital of St. John the Evangelist, Cambridge, to provide new insights into the medieval benefits system.

Evidence of major conflict in Spain 5,000-years-ago

Archaeologists have uncovered the skeletal remains of more than 300 individuals, indicating that a major conflict occurred in Laguardia, Spain, 5,000-years-ago.

Team reports on abuse of students doing anthropological fieldwork

College athletes are not the only ones who sometimes suffer at the hands of higher ups. A new report brings to light a more hidden and pernicious problem – the psychological, physical and sexual abuse of students in the field of biological anthropology working in field studies far from home.

7,000BC: The dawn of cinema brought to life at Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Some of the world’s oldest engravings of the human form – prehistoric rock art from the Italian Alps – have been brought to life by the latest digital technology at Cambridge Unviersity’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

A new scientific study proves that there is not any association between facial shape and aggression

There is not significant evidence to support the association between facial shape and aggression in men, according to a study published by the journal PLOS ONE.

Early Human Burials Varied Widely but Most Were Simple

A new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows that the earliest human burial practices in Eurasia varied widely, with some graves lavish and ornate while the vast majority were fairly plain.

Aztec Conquest Altered Genetics among Early Mexico Inhabitants, New DNA Study Shows

For centuries, the fate of the original Otomí inhabitants of Xaltocan, the capital of a pre-Aztec Mexican city-state, has remained unknown. Researchers have long wondered whether they assimilated with the Aztecs or abandoned the town altogether.

A relative from the Tianyuan Cave

Ancient DNA has revealed that humans living some 40,000 years ago in the area near Beijing were likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans

What did our ancestors look like?

A new method of establishing hair and eye colour from modern forensic samples can also be used to identify details from ancient human remains, finds a new study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Investigative Genetics.

Most of the harmful mutations in people arose in the past 5,000 to 10,000 years

A study dating the age of more than 1 million single-letter variations in the human DNA code reveals that most of these mutations are of recent origin, evolutionarily speaking. These kinds of mutations change one nucleotide – an A, C, T or G – in the DNA sequence. Over 86 percent of the harmful protein-coding mutations of this type arose in humans just during the past 5,000 to 10,000 years.

Skeletons in cave reveal Mediterranean secrets

Skeletal remains in an island cave in Favignana, Italy, reveal that modern humans first settled in Sicily around the time of the last ice age and despite living on Mediterranean islands, ate little seafood. The research is published November 28 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Marcello Mannino and colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany.

The Study of Human Remains: What does it really tell us? Part 1

The study of human remains can tell us a great deal about a society; status, wealth, religion and others. When an archaeologist studies one set of human remains, he is seeking specific information about that one person

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