Geophysical study finds evidence of “labyrinth” buried beneath Mitla

A geophysical study has found underground structures and tunnels beneath Mitla – The Zapotec “Place of the Dead”

Discovery of a Romanesque religious structure rewrites history of Frauenchiemsee

Archaeologists from the Bavarian State Office for Monument Preservation have announced the discovery of a Romanesque religious structure on the island of Frauenchiemsee, the second largest of the three islands in Chiemsee, Germany.

Ring discovery suggests a previously unknown princely family in Southwest Jutland

A ring discovered in Southwest Jutland, Denmark, suggests a previously unknown princely family who had strong connections with the rulers of France.

Submerged evidence of rice cultivation and slavery found in North Carolina

Researchers from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) are using side-scan sonar and positioning systems to find evidence of rice cultivation and slavery beneath the depths of North Carolina’s lower Cape Fear and Brunswick rivers.

Study reveals oldest and longest example of Vasconic script

A new study of the 2100-year-old Hand of Irulegi has revealed the oldest and longest example of Vasconic script.

Archaeologists excavate the marginalised community of Vaakunakylä

Archaeologists have excavated the marginalised community of Vaakunakylä, a former Nazi barracks occupied by homeless Finns following the end of WW2.

Archaeologists find 4,000-year-old cobra-shaped ceramic handle

A team of archaeologists from National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan have uncovered a 4,000-year-old cobra-shaped ceramic handle in the Guanyin District of Taoyuan City.

Traces of Khan al-Tujjar caravanserais found at foot of Mount Tabor

During excavations near Beit Keshet in Lower Galilee, Israel, archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) have uncovered traces of a market within the historic Khan al-Tujjar caravanserais.

Popular Articles

Archaeology

Geophysical study finds evidence of “labyrinth” buried beneath Mitla

A geophysical study has found underground structures and tunnels beneath Mitla – The Zapotec “Place of the Dead”

Discovery of a Romanesque religious structure rewrites history of Frauenchiemsee

Archaeologists from the Bavarian State Office for Monument Preservation have announced the discovery of a Romanesque religious structure on the island of Frauenchiemsee, the second largest of the three islands in Chiemsee, Germany.

Ring discovery suggests a previously unknown princely family in Southwest Jutland

A ring discovered in Southwest Jutland, Denmark, suggests a previously unknown princely family who had strong connections with the rulers of France.

Submerged evidence of rice cultivation and slavery found in North Carolina

Researchers from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) are using side-scan sonar and positioning systems to find evidence of rice cultivation and slavery beneath the depths of North Carolina’s lower Cape Fear and Brunswick rivers.

Anthropology

Wessex Archaeology finds Anglo-Saxon cemetery

Wessex Archaeology has uncovered an Anglo-Saxon cemetery during excavations for Viking Link, a submarine power cable connecting the United Kingdom and Denmark.

Rich array of funerary offerings found in burials at Cima de San José

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have uncovered numerous funerary offerings among 48 burials at Cima de San José.

Dentistry during Viking Age was surprisingly advanced

Dentistry during Viking Age was surprisingly advanced, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Gothenburg.

Archaeologists analyse medieval benefits system

Archaeologists from the University of Leicester have conducted a study in the main cemetery of the hospital of St. John the Evangelist, Cambridge, to provide new insights into the medieval benefits system.

Palaeoanthropology

Early humans hunted beavers 400,000-years-ago

Researchers suggests that early humans were hunting, skinning, and eating beavers around 400,000-years-ago.

First modern humans in Europe are associated with the Gravettian culture

A study conducted by CNRS has determined who the first modern humans to settle in Europe were.

Archaeologists find 476,000-year-old wooden structure

Archaeologists from the University of Liverpool and Aberystwyth University have discovered a wooden structure dating from at least 476,000-years-ago, the earliest known example to date.

Evidence of Neanderthal cannibalism found in Spanish cave

Archaeologists conducting excavations in the Coves del Toll de Moià have uncovered evidence of Neanderthal cannibalism from more than 52,000-years-ago.

Heritage

What happened to the Nazi gold train?

In 2015, the global media was abuzz with the reports of a purported discovery of a Nazi gold train believed to be buried in Poland.

Has the fate of Amelia Earhart finally been solved?

Deep Sea Vision, an underwater mapping and exploratory company, claims to have solved the fate of Amelia Earhart who went missing in 1937.

Study of Roman pottery reveals complex flavours of wine

Archaeologists have revealed new insights into the techniques used in the production of Roman wine, including how it looked, smelled and tasted.

Black Caesar the Pirate

Black Caesar gained infamy as a pirate and served on the Queen Anne’s Revenge, the flagship commanded by Edward Teach, more commonly known as Blackbeard.

Mobile Application

The HeritageDaily application serves as a valuable resource for enthusiasts, students, academics, and professionals interested in exploring the diverse facets of our past.

Palaeontology

New discovery sheds light on the evolution of birds

Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Late Jurassic period, however, our knowledge of the initial stages of Avialae's evolution is limited due to a scarcity of Jurassic fossils.

World’s oldest ‘stomach stone’ fossil found on Jurassic Coast

Palaeontologists have discovered a 150-million-year-old stomach stone on England’s Jurassic Coast.

Predatory dinosaurs such as T. rex sported lizard-like lips

A new study suggests that predatory dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus rex, did not have permanently exposed teeth as depicted in films such as Jurassic Park, but instead had scaly, lizard-like lips covering and sealing their mouths.

Ichthyosaur found on remote Artic island upends previous evolutionary theory

Palaeontologists have found the remains of an Ichthyosaur on the island of Spitsbergen, located in the Svalbard archipelago in northern Norway.

Geology

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

Study suggests that nature played a role in the origins of the Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature characterised by the combination of a human head and a lion's body.

Geological puzzle of lost continent of Argoland solved

Approximately 155 million years ago, a 5000 km piece of continent broke off from western Australia, leaving behind a basin hidden below the ocean known as the Argo Abyssal Plain.

The Cave of Crystals

The Cave of Crystals is a large chamber containing giant crystals in the Naica Mine, located in Mexico’s State of Chihuahua.

Climate Change

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

US Navy ships from WWII provide new climate evidence

Researchers have recovered the logbooks from US Navy ships stationed at Pearl Harbour, providing new evidence for understanding how the global climate is changing.

Extreme cooling caused extinction of early humans in Europe

Study led by the University College London (UCL) suggests that an extreme cooling period approximately 1.1 million years ago likely contributed to the extinction of early human populations in Europe.

Chimú Culture constructed 10 km wall to protect capital against El Niño events

Archaeologists conducting a study of the Muralla La Cumbre, a 10 km wall in northern Peru, have concluded that the Chimú Culture constructed the wall to protect the capital of Chan Chan against El Niño events.

Natural History

Ancient tsunami wiped out prehistoric communities in Northern England

A study by the University of York has revealed that a tsunami wiped out prehistoric communities living in Northumberland, England, causing wide-scale depopulation across the region.

Travels of a 14,000-year-old woolly mammoth tied to earliest Alaska hunting camps

Scientists have established a connection between the travels of a 14,000-year-old woolly mammoth and the oldest known human settlements in Alaska.

Baboons in Ancient Egypt were raised in captivity before being mummified

In a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, researchers examined a collection of baboon mummies from the ancient Egyptian site of Gabbanat el-Qurud, the so-called Valley of the Monkeys on the west bank of Luxor.

Head lice evolution mirrors human migration and colonisation in the Americas

A recent analysis of lice's genetic diversity suggests that these parasites arrived in the Americas on two distinct occasions: first during the initial human migration across the Bering Strait, and later with the advent of European colonisation.

Travel

The Kizil Caves

The Kizil Caves, also known as Kizilgaha or Kizilgaha Caves, are a set of Buddhist rock-cut caves located near the Kizil Township in Baicheng County, Xinjiang, China.

Tomb of Qin Er Shi – The Second Emperor of China

Qin Er Shi, born Ying Huhai, was the second emperor of the Qin dynasty, the ruling family of a unified China - established by the first emperor, Qin Shi Huang.

Fort Drum – The Concrete Battleship

Fort Drum, nicknamed the "Concrete Battleship", is a fortified island situated at the mouth of Manila Bay in the Philippines.

The Pyramid Tombs of Libya

Several pyramidal necropolises exist in Libya from the reign of the Garamantes, a kingdom that emerged as a major regional power in the Sahara during the mid-2nd century AD.

Cave-In-Rock and America’s river pirates

Cave-In-Rock, also known as Murrell's Cave and Potato Cave, is a 17-metre-wide riverside cave located in the town of Cave-in-Rock, State of Illinois, United States.

The coral city of Leluh

Leluh is a coral city constructed on Lelu Island, a satellite of the larger island of Kosrae in the Federated States of Micronesia in the central Pacific.

Latest Articles

The Requiem of Hawass

In the year of our Lord 2011, a silence fell like a shadow over Egypt, a silence so loud it's roar was heard around the world. Like something straight from the walls of one of the great monuments, our newspapers and televisions produced hieroglyphics that depicted an age of larger than life characters and of political and social revolution, the likes of which we have difficulty in believing in the 21st Centuries ability to produce such events in a bloody and somewhat nonchalant attitude, reminiscent of events we deem to stay in history books.

Did warfare spark the development of civilisations?

Ancient warfare around 400-500 BC and during the first century AD may have been responsible in part, for shaping how civilisations developed in the Titicaca basin, Peru.

Archaeologists excavate the Canaanite/Israelite site of Tell Belata

Archaeologists excavate the ancient Canaanite/Israelite of Tell Belata,  in the West Bank of Palestine in Nablus.

Cliff side blockhouse possibly built by Henry VIII to be excavated by archaeologists

Archaeologists have started excavations of a cliff-side blockhouse from the reign of Henry VII on the Angle Peninsula in Pembrokshire.

Olympia’s destruction caused by tsunamis

A new study on the sedimentary burial of Olympia has revealed that it was possibly destroyed by a series of tsunamis.

The Death Of British Archaeology?….. Not quite yet.

The positions available to archaeologists diminishes all the time, yet people around the world still hear the calling of the dirt. They say now that...

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