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Micro-CT scans show 2,100-year-old ‘hawk’ mummy a stillborn baby

A tiny Egyptian mummy long believed to be that of a hawk is actually a rare example of a near-to-term, severely malformed fetus, says an examination led by mummy expert Andrew Nelson of Western University in London, Canada.

Spiral circle of linked human skeletons discovered at Pre-Aztec burial site in Mexico

A spiral formation of human remains has been unearthed in an ancient burial pit during excavations at a Pre-Aztec village in the south of Mexico City.

The History of Chocolate

If you can’t imagine life without chocolate, you’re lucky you weren’t born before the 16th century. Until then, chocolate only existed as a bitter, foamy drink in Mesoamerica. So how did we get from a bitter beverage to the chocolate bars of today? Deanna Pucciarelli traces the fascinating and often cruel history of chocolate. Lesson by Deanna Pucciarelli, animation by TED-Ed.

Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 years connection to country

DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s has revealed that populations have been continuously present in the same regions for up to 50,000 years – soon after the peopling of Australia.

Internet Archaeologists Find Ruins Of ‘Friendster’ Civilization

Researchers conducting the Friendster excavation say the site has been deserted since the year 2005 A.D.

Archaeologists throw new light on Shakespeare after uncovering the stage at The Curtain Theatre

A three-month detailed excavation of Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre by MOLA archaeologists has revealed details of a stage that is much longer than originally thought with evidence of a passageway running beneath it. Archaeologists can now also confirm that the theatre was a purpose-built structure at the rear of another building on Curtain Road in Shoreditch.

Underwater Stone Age settlement mapped out

Six years ago divers discovered the oldest known stationary fish traps in northern Europe off the coast of southern Sweden. Since then, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have uncovered an exceptionally well-preserved Stone Age site. They now believe the location was a lagoon environment where Mesolithic humans lived during parts of the year.

New letters by WW1 Muslim soldiers disclosed

On Armistice Day, a literature expert at Birmingham City University has disclosed previously unreported letters from the early 1900s by some of India’s Muslim...

Researchers reconstruct house in ancient Pompeii using 3D technology

By combining traditional archaeology with 3D technology, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have managed to reconstruct a house in Pompeii to its original state before the volcano eruption of Mount Vesuvius thousands of years ago. Unique video material has now been produced, showing their creation of a 3D model of an entire block of houses.

The ancient origins of the Olympics

Thousands of years in the making, the Olympics began as part of a religious festival honoring the Greek god Zeus in the rural Greek town of Olympia. But how did it become the greatest show of sporting excellence on earth? Armand D’Angour explains the evolution of the Olympics.

Herod’s Temple – 3D Game Environment

Herod's Temple is actually a reconstruction and continuation of the second temple, that Under Herod began a massive expansion of the Temple Mount.

The wars that inspired Game of Thrones

Beginning around 1377, medieval England was shaken by a power struggle between two noble families, which spanned generations and involved a massive cast of characters, complex motives and shifting loyalties. Sound familiar? Alex Gendler illustrates how the historical conflict known as the Wars of the Roses served as the basis for much of the drama in Game of Thrones.

The pharaoh that wouldn’t be forgotten – Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut was a female pharaoh during the New Kingdom in Egypt. Twenty years after her death, somebody smashed her statues, took a chisel and attempted to erase the pharaoh’s name and image from history. But who did it? And why? Kate Narev investigates Hatshepsut's history for clues to this ancient puzzle.

The great conspiracy against Julius Caesar

On March 15th, 44 BCE, Roman dictator Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of about 60 of his own senators. Why did these self-titled Liberators want him dead? And why did Brutus, whose own life had been saved by Caesar, join in the plot? Kathryn Tempest investigates the personal and political assassination of Julius Caesar.

The Atlantic slave trade

Slavery has occurred in many forms throughout the world, but the Atlantic slave trade -- which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas -- stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy. Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of this massive historical injustice.