Herod’s Temple – 3D Game Environment

Herod’s Temple is actually a reconstruction and continuation of the second temple, that Under Herod began a massive expansion of the Temple Mount.

Religious worship and temple rituals continued during the construction process. When the Roman emperor Caligula planned to place his own statue inside the temple, Herod’s grandson Agrippa I was able to intervene and convince him against this.

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Herod’s Temple was one of the larger construction projects of the 1st century BCE. Josephus records that Herod was interested in perpetuating his name through building projects, that his construction programs were extensive and paid for by heavy taxes, but that his masterpiece was the Temple of Jerusalem.

Image Credit : Shahaf Shaked
Image Credit : Shahaf Shaked

The architect behind the game’s construction, Shahaf Shaked said:

“Developing Herod’s Temple 1.0 took roughly six months. As I only started learning modelling and game development with this project, about 80% of the time invested in this recreation was spent going back and fixing errors.

Although I am a Bachelor of Archaeology of Ben-Gurion University, I took a conscious decision to do this project as an enthusiast rather than as an archaeologist for the sake of expediency and the freedom to simplify the models in order to make the game playable on older machines (which is why it was also compiled in 32-bit and not 64-bit).

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The game was built inside the Unreal Engine. It is and will continue to be a work in progress for as long as I can help it. It is 100% free for educational and individual use.”


Download the Temple  Game – English


Download the Temple Game – Hebrew


 

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Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan is multi-award-winning journalist and the Managing Editor at HeritageDaily. His background is in archaeology and computer science, having written over 7,500 articles across several online publications. Mark is a member of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), the World Federation of Science Journalists, and in 2023 was the recipient of the British Citizen Award for Education, the BCA Medal of Honour, and the UK Prime Minister's Points of Light Award.
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