Geology

Lost world discovered beneath Antarctic ice

A large-scale transcontinental river system from the Eocene era, dating back 44 to 34 million years ago, has been discovered beneath the Antarctic ice.

New study upends prevailing theory on transportation of Stonehenge bluestones

A new study, published in the Quaternary Newsletter journal, suggests that the Bristol Channel was a glacial transport route.

Study analyses organic material from 3.5 billion-year-old biomass

Researchers from the University of Göttingen are using high resolution techniques to trace the origin and composition of a 3.5 billion-year-old biomass.

Source of Snowball Earth solved

Geologists have solved the source of Snowball Earth, a period when the planet’s environment was an extreme "icehouse".

Study suggests that nature played a role in the origins of the Great Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature characterised by the combination of a human head and a lion's body.

Pink rocks from Russia expose one of the greatest events in the history of Earth

The Great Oxidation Event is one of the major scientific mysteries. Oxygen appeared on the planet for the first time over 2,3 billion years ago. A new Science study is making scientists rethink what they thought they knew about the event.

Research suggests water appeared while Earth was still growing

Up until about ten years ago, scientists thought they had a pretty good picture of how the moon and Earth came to co-exist. Then more precise measurements blew it all wide open, and scientists are still struggling to reconcile them.

Two-billion-year-old salt rock reveals rise of oxygen in ancient atmosphere

A 2-billion-year-old chunk of sea salt provides new evidence for the transformation of Earth's atmosphere into an oxygenated environment capable of supporting life as we know it.

Mass extinction with prior warning

Mass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms.

Germany was covered by glaciers 450,000 years ago

The timing of the Middle Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles and the feedback mechanisms between climatic shifts and earth-surface processes are still poorly understood.

Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland’s conversion to Christianity

Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests.

Workers discover ancient coastline in West London

Engineers working on Britain’s new high speed railway have discovered an ancient, sub-tropical coastline dating back 56 million years.

Ash from dinosaur-era volcanoes linked with shale oil, gas

Nutrient-rich ash from an enormous flare-up of volcanic eruptions toward the end of the dinosaurs' reign kicked off a chain of events that led to the formation of shale gas and oil fields from Texas to Montana.

New study reveals the secret of magmas that produce global treasures

South Africa's history and economy has been built on its rich natural treasures of a number of precious metals, stones and minerals.

A mineral blueprint for finding Burgess Shale-type fossils

Scientists have identified a mineral signature for sites that are more likely to contain rare fossils that preserve evidence of soft tissue -- essential information to understanding ancient life.

Meteorite analysis shows reduced salt is key in Earth’s new recipe

Scientists have found the halogen levels in the meteorites that formed the Earth billions of years ago are much lower than previously thought.

Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics

When renowned University of Toronto (U of T) geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson cemented concepts in the emerging field of plate tectonics in the 1960s, he revolutionized the study of Earth's physical characteristics and behaviours.

An international group of scientists reveals the mystery about the origin of gold

An international group of scientists, with the participation of the University of Granada (UGR), has shed new light on the origin of gold, one of the most intriguing mysteries for Mankind since ancient times and which even today doesn't have an answer that convinces the scientific community.

Why did the Earth’s ancient oceans disappear?

We think of oceans as being stable and permanent. However, they move at about the same speed as your fingernails grow. Geoscientists at CEED, University of Oslo have found a novel way of mapping the Earth’s ancient oceans.

Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climate

A new geological record of the Yellowstone supervolcano's last catastrophic eruption is rewriting the story of what happened 630,000 years ago and how it affected Earth's climate. This eruption formed the vast Yellowstone caldera observed today, the second largest on Earth.

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