Palaeoanthropology

Early humans hunted beavers 400,000-years-ago

Researchers suggests that early humans were hunting, skinning, and eating beavers around 400,000-years-ago.

First modern humans in Europe are associated with the Gravettian culture

A study conducted by CNRS has determined who the first modern humans to settle in Europe were.

Archaeologists find 476,000-year-old wooden structure

Archaeologists from the University of Liverpool and Aberystwyth University have discovered a wooden structure dating from at least 476,000-years-ago, the earliest known example to date.

Evidence of Neanderthal cannibalism found in Spanish cave

Archaeologists conducting excavations in the Coves del Toll de Moià have uncovered evidence of Neanderthal cannibalism from more than 52,000-years-ago.

Researchers find oldest known Neanderthal engravings

A study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE has provided evidence to date the age and origin of engravings discovered on a cave wall in France.

Neanderthals Used Toothpicks, New Research Reveals

Neanderthals from around 46,000 years ago used ‘toothpicks and oral hygiene’ an international team of scientists have found.

The Human Footprints of Ojo Guareña

The CENIEH has participated in the study of the prints of bare feet found at the Sala y Galerías de las Huellas site in the Ojo Guareña Karst Complex (Burgos), which are the marks left in a soft floor sediment of an exploration by a small group of people between 4600 and 4200 years ago.

New Technology Allows Scientists First Glimpse of Intricate Details of Little Foot’s Life

In June 2019, an international team brought the complete skull of the 3.67-million-year-old Little Foot Australopithecus skeleton, from South Africa to the UK and achieved unprecedented imaging resolution of its bony structures and dentition in an X-ray synchrotron-based investigation at the UK's national synchrotron, Diamond Light Source.

Neandertals Had Capacity to Perceive and Produce Human Speech

Neandertals -- the closest ancestor to modern humans -- possessed the ability to perceive and produce human speech, according to a new study published by an international multidisciplinary team of researchers including Binghamton University anthropology professor Rolf Quam and graduate student Alex Velez.

Ancient Skeletal Hand Could Reveal Evolutionary Secrets

Evolutionary expert Charles Darwin and others recognized a close evolutionary relationship between humans, chimps and gorillas based on their shared anatomies, raising some big questions: how are humans related to other primates, and exactly how did early humans move around? Research by a Texas A&M University professor may provide some answers.

Neanderthals & Homo Sapiens Used Identical Nubian Technology

Long held in a private collection, the newly analysed tooth of an approximately 9-year-old Neanderthal child marks the hominin's southernmost known range.

On the Origin of Our Species

Experts from the Natural History Museum, The Francis Crick Institute and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History Jena have joined together to untangle the different meanings of ancestry in the evolution of our species Homo sapiens.

Hominins of Olduvai Gorge Coped With Ecological Changes

Olduvai (now Oldupai) Gorge, known as the Cradle of Humankind, is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Tanzania, made famous by Louis and Mary Leakey.

New Evidence: Neandertals Buried Their Dead

Was burial of the dead practiced by Neandertals or is it an innovation specific to our species?

Neanderthal Thumbs Better Adapted to Holding Tools With Handles

Neanderthal thumbs were better adapted to holding tools in the same way that we hold a hammer, according to a paper published in Scientific Reports.

First Exhaustive Review of Fossils Recovered From Iberian Archaeological Sites

Despite being rare, fossils nonetheless appear to be common elements in archaeological records.

Middle Stone Age Populations Repeatedly Occupied West African Coast

Although coastlines have widely been proposed as potential corridors of past migration, the occupation of Africa's tropical coasts during the Stone Age is poorly known, particularly in contrast to the temperate coasts of northern and southern Africa.

Newly Discovered Fossil Shows Small-Scale Evolutionary Changes in an Extinct Human Species

Males of the extinct human species Paranthropus robustus were thought to be substantially larger than females -- much like the size differences seen in modern-day primates such as gorillas, orangutans and baboons.

Denisovan DNA Found in Sediments of Baishiya Karst Cave on Tibetan Plateau

One year after the publication of research on the Xiahe mandible, the first Denisovan fossil found outside of Denisova Cave, the same research team has now reported their findings of Denisovan DNA from sediments of the Baishiya Karst Cave (BKC) on the Tibetan Plateau where the Xiahe mandible was found. 

Neanderthal Children Grew and Were Weaned Similar to us

Neanderthals behaved not so differently from us in raising their children, whose pace of growth was similar to Homo sapiens.

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