Archaeology

Brass trumpets among cargo of 16th century shipwreck

Underwater archaeologists from the International Centre for Underwater Archaeology in Zadar have discovered a cargo of brass trumpets at the wreck site of a 16th-century ship.

Ancient Egyptian carvings found submerged in Lake Nasser

A joint French/Egyptian archaeological mission has discovered a collection of Ancient Egyptian carvings beneath the waters of Lake Nasser, Egypt.

3,800-year-old textile dyed using insects found in desert cave

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), Bar-Ilan University, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have discovered the earliest known example in Israel of red-dyed textiles made using insects.

Archaeologists discover traces of Roman circus at Iruña-Veleia

Archaeologists from ARKIKUS have announced the discovery of a Roman circus at Iruña-Veleia, a former Roman town in Hispania, now located in the province of Álava, Basque Autonomous Community, Spain.

Archaeologists make new discoveries at Bodbury Ring hillfort

Bodbury Ring is a univallate hillfort, strategically located at the southern tip of Bodbury Hill in Shropshire, England.

Durham becomes first UK team to excavate in Forbidden City

Archaeologists from Durham University in the UK have become the first UK team to excavate inside the walls of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China.

Military veterans and local community help archaeologists excavate major castle site

An archaeological project which is taking place on the site of a medieval castle near Ormskirk, West Lancashire, has been set up to help solve some baffling archaeological mysteries.

New Kingdom Egypt: The goldsmith’s tomb

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich Egyptologist Julia Budka is studying the impact of intercultural contacts in Ancient Egypt.

Casting light on the dark ages: Anglo-Saxon fenland is re-imagined

What was life in the fens like in the period known as the dark ages?  Archaeologist Susan Oosthuizen revisits the history of an iconic wetland in the light of fresh evidence and paints a compelling portrait of communities in tune with their changeable environment. In doing so, she makes an important contribution to a wider understanding of early medieval landscapes.

2,700-Year-Old Water System Discovered Near Rosh Ha-Ayin

An impressively large 2,700-year-old water system has been discovered during excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority near Rosh Ha-Ayin.

Kakadu find confirms earliest Australian occupation

Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years - much longer than the 47,000 years believed by some archaeologists.

Archaeologists unearth ancient origins of New Forest town

Archaeologists have uncovered evidence of homes that housed some of the earliest inhabitants of a New Forest town.

Why archaeological antiquities should not be sold on the open market, full stop

Illicit antiquities are once again in the headlines. US retailer Hobby Lobby was recently fined US$3m (£2.3m) for illegally acquiring antiquities that were most likely looted from Iraq.

A feast of finds from Cornwall’s First Golden Age

Excavations at Tintagel Castle have revealed that the early Cornish kings feasted on a diet of oysters, roast pork and fine wine, dining and drinking from bowls imported from Turkey and glass goblets from Spain, English Heritage announced today (13 July 2017) as archaeologists return to the legendary castle to continue their investigations.

Ancient ‘House of the Dead’ discovered in Wiltshire

A ‘House of the Dead’ has been discovered in Wiltshire dating back 5,000 years by University of Reading archaeologists and students, and could contain the ancestors of those who lived around Stonehenge and Avebury.

St Columba’s cell on Iona revealed by archaeologists

Archaeologists from the University of Glasgow have uncovered conclusive evidence that a wooden hut traditionally associated with St Columba at the monastery on the island of Iona does indeed date to his lifetime in the late sixth century AD.

Easter Island not victim of ‘ecocide’, analysis of remains shows

Analysis of remains found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely-held belief that the ancient civilization recklessly destroyed its environment, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Ancient Greek theaters used moveable stages more than 2,000 years ago

An investigation by an architectural researcher from Kumamoto University, Japan has revealed the high possibility that a wooden stage existed in the theater of the ancient Greek City of Messene during the Greek Classical period (ca. 369 BC).

Roman tablets unearthed at Vindolanda

An Exciting New Hoard of Ancient Roman Writing Tablets Unearthed at Vindolanda.

Archaeologists put sound back into a previously silent past

Many attempts to explain how past people experienced their wider world have focused on sight at the expense of sound, but researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.

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