Archaeology

Labyrinthine structure discovered from the Minoan civilisation

Archaeologists have discovered a monumental labyrinthine structure on the summit of Papoura Hill in Crete.

Dragon sculpture found on the Jiankou section of the Great Wall of China

Archaeologists conducting restoration works on the Jiankou section of the Great Wall of China have discovered an ornate dragon sculpture.

9,000-year-old Neolithic stone mask unveiled

A rare stone mask from the Neolithic period has been unveiled for the first time by the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Archaeologists recover two medieval grave slabs from submerged shipwreck

Underwater archaeologists from Bournemouth University have recovered two medieval grave slabs from a shipwreck off the coast of Dorset, England.

Study confirms palace of King Ghezo was site of voodoo blood rituals

A study, published in the journal Proteomics, presents new evidence to suggest that voodoo blood rituals were performed at the palace of King Ghezo.

Archaeologists uncover Viking Army Camp

A huge camp which was home to thousands of Vikings as they prepared to conquer England in the late ninth century has been uncovered by archaeologists.

Archaeological project reveals historic earthquake in Cyprus

An excavation conducted in Dreamer’s Bay, within RAF Akrotiri airbase, by professional and student archaeologists from the University of Leicester has uncovered valuable new information about remains in the ancient port.

Changes in Early Stone Age tool production have ‘musical’ ties

New research suggests that advances in the production of Early Stone Age tools had less to do with the evolution of language and more to do with the brain networks involved in modern piano playing.

4,000-year-old funerary garden discovered on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor

The Djehuty Project has discovered a 4,000-year-old funerary garden- the first such garden ever to be found- on the Dra Abu el-Naga hill in Luxor, Egypt. The discovery comes during the 16th year of archaeological excavations in the region.

Official launch of public database of ‘at risk’ archaeological sites

It is hoped that the database will drive awareness of the scale of the problem and help governments, NGOs, and other regional stakeholders preserve the heritage of the people of the Middle East and the wider world.

Three-thousand-year-old axes found in farmer’s field in mid-Norway

Some 3,000 years ago, 24 axes were cached in Stjørdal municipality, about 44 km east of Trondheim. They’re now seeing the light of day once again.

Can houses die? Iron-age to Viking longhouses were burned and buried

From the Bronze Age until the Viking Age, burial mounds could be placed on top of the remains of three-aisled longhouses. The internal posts that served as roof-supporting beams were sometimes removed before the house was set on fire. Once the house had burned to the ground, one or more burial mounds were placed on top of its remains.

World War One Battlefield Tunnels Discovered Under Salisbury Plain

Archaeologists working in Wiltshire have identified a unique network of First World War tunnels under Salisbury Plain.

Digital app brings to life one of Scotland’s key prehistoric settlement sites

A new online digital resource has been launched to bring to life one of Scotland's most important prehistoric settlement landscapes.

Medieval priest discovered in elaborate grave 700 years after his death

The remains of a medieval priest who died 700 years ago have been uncovered in an elaborate grave.

Fantastic eggs and where to find them

Archaeologists and scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Durham and the British Museum are using cutting edge technology to crack a conundrum surrounding the ancient trade in ostrich eggs.

Precision chronology sheds new light on the origins of Mongolia’s nomadic horse culture

According to new research, nomadic horse culture -- famously associated with Genghis Khan and his Mongol hordes -- can trace its roots back more than 3,000 years in the eastern Eurasian Steppes, in the territory of modern Mongolia.

We’re closer to learning when humans first daubed arrows with poison

Exactly when did human beings start tipping their weapons with poison to hunt prey? This is a question at the forefront of recent archaeological research.

Prehistoric alpine farming in the Bernese Oberland

The people in Switzerland were on the move in the High Alps and running alpine pastures 7,000 years ago and therefore much earlier than previously assumed. A study by the University of Bern that combines archaeological knowledge with findings from palaeoecology comes to this conclusion. Prehistoric finds from the Schnidejoch Pass played a crucial part in this.

Crete’s Late Minoan tombs points way to early European migration

Researchers at the University of Huddersfield have visited Rethymnon in Crete, to collect samples from the late Bronze Age Necropolis of Armenoi, one of the world’s finest archaeological sites. DNA analysis of the ancient skeletal remains could provide fresh insights into the origins of European civilisation.

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