Trimontium (Newstead) – The Roman Fort

Related Articles

Related Articles

Trimontium is Roman fort complex located in Newstead on the Scottish Borders.

The fort is a complex archaeological site, with excavations by archaeologists revealing many phases of construction, with periods of expansion and reduction depending on the necessary requirements of the Roman army at the time.

Studies suggest that four consecutive forts were built at Trimontium, accompanied on all four sides by various partially over-lapping enclosures and defensive ditches. Adjacent to the fort was a vicus, estimated to comprise of up to 100 buildings that form the largest vicus of any fort in Scotland.

After the Roman conquest of Britannia, the Romans looked to establish a new province in the tribal lands of Caledonia (present-day Scotland). Caledonia was inhabited by several ancient tribes, most notably the Caledonii, Vacomagi, Cornavii, Taexali, Creones, Venicones, Epidii, Lugi, Smertae and the Damnonii, that the Romans nicknamed “Brittunculi” meaning “nasty little Britons”.

Image Credit : Markus Milligan

Incursions into central and northern Caledonia established chains of fortifications between 70-80 AD and exploratory marching camps encircling the Fife, Angus, Tayside, Crampians, and stretching as far north as the Moray Firth (next to the modern city of Inverness).


Subscribe to more articles like this by following our Google Discovery feed - Click the follow button on your desktop or the star button on mobile. Subscribe

An Agricolan fort was established on the banks of the River Tweed at the ‘place of the three hills’, or ‘Trimontium’ in Latin. The first phase of construction was completed around AD 80, consisting of a clay rampart with two ditches, covering an area of 10 acres.

It is likely that Rome had intended to continue campaigning and expand the borders of Britannia from coast to coast, but Rome necessitated a troop withdrawal due to instability in other parts of the Empire. This retreat mirrored the fortunes of Trimontium and it was first abandoned sometime between AD 105 – 137.

During the reign of Emperor Antoninus Pius, the Romans carried out another successful military campaign in southern Scotland, and Trimontium was re-occupied with a garrison.

Antoninus ordered the construction of a wall, the Vallum Antonini (now called the Antonine Wall) along the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde (west of Edinburgh along the central belt of Scotland) moving the frontier 40 miles further north of Trimontium. This placed the fort in a support role as a centre for distributing supplies and managing logistics.

By around AD 165, the Antonine Wall was abandoned and Trimontium was yet again a front-line fort. This precarious position left the fort exposed and the Romans moved the border back to Hadrian’s Wall, finally abandoning Trimontium sometime around AD 180.

Find out more about Trimontium on the Trimontium Museum Trust website.

- Advertisement -

Download the HeritageDaily mobile application on iOS and Android

More on this topic

LATEST NEWS

Takht-e Soleymān – The Throne of Solomon

Takht-e Soleymān is an archaeological site located near the modern-day town of Takab in the West Azerbaijan Province of Iran.

New UD study shows that tropical forest loss is increased by large-scale land acquisitions

In recent years, there has been a rise in foreign and domestic large-scale land acquisitions--defined as being at least roughly one square mile--in Latin America, Asia, and Africa where investing countries and multinational investors take out long-term contracts to use the land for various enterprises.

New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis

In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth’s water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity.

Discovering an exoplanet the size of Neptune

An exoplanet the size of Neptune has been discovered around the young star AU Microscopii, thanks in part to the work of Jonathan Gagné, a former iREx Banting postdoctoral researcher who is now a scientific advisor at the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

A Blue Spark to Shine on the Origin of the Universe

Why is our Universe made of matter? Why does everything exist as we know it? These questions are linked to one of the most important unsolved problems in particle physics.

Trimontium (Newstead) – The Roman Fort

Trimontium is Roman fort complex located in Newstead on the Scottish Borders.

Volcanic Eruption Caused Social and Political Unrest Leading to Rise of Roman Empire

The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 BC triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire.

Diets of Bronze-Age People in Southern Poland was Largely Vegetable Based

New study suggests that ancient Neolithic and Bronze Age people living in the southern parts of modern-day Poland survived mainly on a vegetable-based diet.

New Interactive Map Reveals the Lost Continent of Zealandia

A new mapping interface by the GNS Science’s Te Riu-a-Māui / Zealandia research programme (TRAMZ) reveals the geology of Aotearoa New Zealand and the lost continent of Zealandia.

Werwolf – The Classified Wehrmacht Bunker

Führerhauptquartier Werwolf was the codename for a bunker complex built during WW2 as a military headquarters for Adolf Hitler and his generals to monitor the eastern front.

Popular stories