Sunken Temple Resurfaces in Mahanadi River

Archaeologists from the Indian National Trust for Art (INTACH) have announced the re-appearance of a submerged temple in the Odisha region of India.

The temple was dedicated to Lord Gopinath, an avatar of Vishnu and dates from the 15th-16th century.

During the 19th century, the Mahandi River changed its course, resulting in the Odisha temple and a nearby village to be completed submerged with the rising waters. Many of the temple deities and statues were removed and installed in the Gopinath Dev temple of Padmavati village for safety.

INTACH has been conducting a research project to document the heritage sites and monuments across the entire length of the Mahanadi River, from the source to the sea covering a distance of nearly 1700 km.

- Advertisement -

As many as 65 ancient temples have been found submerged in the Mahanadi river by the project. After several attempts by project members to locate the Odisha temple, INTACH were alerted to reports that the temple was visible for the first time in 11 eleven years.

NTACH chief Anil Kumar Dhir has suggested that the structure could be restored and will be approaching the Archaeological Survey of India to take steps for the temple’s relocation.

- Advertisement -
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan is multi-award-winning journalist and the Managing Editor at HeritageDaily. His background is in archaeology and computer science, having written over 7,500 articles across several online publications. Mark is a member of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), the World Federation of Science Journalists, and in 2023 was the recipient of the British Citizen Award for Education, the BCA Medal of Honour, and the UK Prime Minister's Points of Light Award.

Mobile Application

spot_img

Related Articles

Study uses satellite imagery to identify over 1,000 Andean hillforts

A new study, published in the journal Antiquity, uses satellite imagery to survey hillforts known as pukaras in the Andean highlands.

Roman defensive spikes unveiled at the Leibniz Centre for Archaeology

In 2023, archaeologists from Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main uncovered a series of wooden defensive spikes during excavations of a 1st century AD Roman fort in Bad Ems, western Germany.

Obsidian blade linked to Coronado’s expedition to find the fabled city of gold

Archaeologists suggest that a flaked-stone obsidian blade could be linked to the expedition led by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado to search for the fabled city of gold.

Clay seal stamp from First Temple period found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists have discovered a clay seal stamp from the First Temple period during excavations in the Western Wall Plaza, Jerusalem.

Offering of human sacrifices found at Pozo de Ibarra

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have uncovered an offering of human sacrifices at the Mexican town of Pozo de Ibarra.

Excavation uncovers preserved wooden cellar from Roman period

Archaeologists from the Frankfurt Archaeological Museum have uncovered a well-preserved wooden celler in Frankfurt, Germany.

Preserved temples from the Badami Chalukya era found in India

Archaeologists from the Public Research Institute of History, Archaeology, and Heritage (PRIHAH) have announced the discovery of two temples dating from the Badami Chalukya era.

Excavation of medieval shipbuilders reveals a Roman head of Mercury

Excavations of a medieval shipbuilders has led to the discovery of a Roman settlement and a Roman head of Mercury.