Historvius – Roman Ruins HD

Related Articles

Related Articles

Virtually explore the very best Roman ruins from the comfort of home. Immerse yourself in a wealth of stunning Roman sites – it’s the next best thing to being there!

Simply tilt, pan and move your iPad around to virtually walk through some of the world’s very best Roman ruins while also browsing expert guides to more than 350 Roman sites and over 1,500 awe-inspiring photos.

This astounding app is part virtual reality, part photo book and part inspirational travel guide all rolled into one.

 

This immersive, visually-rich coffee table app has been professionally curated to help you discover a vast range of ruins from the Roman Empire and Roman historical sites. You can explore Roman archaeological sites by country, category, gallery browsing or via the interactive map.

Collections include curated guides to the very best Roman amphitheatres, temples, forts, aqueducts, theatres, baths, underground ruins, hidden gems and many more. You can browse collections of the best-preserved historic sites of the Roman Empire, editor’s choices and a top ten list. There’s even a collection of heritage sites linked to the life of Julius Caesar, following in the very footsteps of this famous Roman general!

Roman Ruins HD also provides a fascinating educational teaching aide, allowing students to safely explore historic sites all across the world – perfect for schoolroom classics, classroom history or classroom geography alike!

‘History buffs will love the gorgeous interactive content in Roman Ruins HD. It lets you wander around some of the most awe-inspiring sites from the Roman Empire without leaving your front room. When you start exploring the 1,500+ high-definition photos with expert narration, 3D aerial views and oodles more fantastic content it’s not hard to see why the tablet computer is becoming the new coffee-table tome in so many homes’ – BBC News

‘An engrossing app whether you’re an expert in the subject matter, or simply a casual observer wondering what the Romans ever did for us’ – The Guardian

‘Beautifully designed, informative entries and picture galleries from sites as diverse as Volubilis in Morocco to Armenia’s Garni Temple’ – Lonely Planet

‘There’s a pleasure in this app, which approaches its inexhaustible subject just right: handsome photographs and links, the most important historical points and a little touristy info for visitors. Worth a place on the iPads of classics buffs and armchair (and actual) travelers’ – Kirkus Reviews

 

Download the HeritageDaily mobile application on iOS and Android

More on this topic

LATEST NEWS

The Lost Town of Trellech

Trellech is a small rural village in south-east Wales, but during the 13th century, it was one of the largest medieval towns in all of Wales.

The Varangian Guard – When Vikings Served the Eastern Roman Empire

The Varangian Guard was an elite unit that served as the personal bodyguards for the emperors of the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Roman Empire).

Walking, Talking and Showing Off – a History of Roman Gardens

In ancient Rome, you could tell a lot about a person from the look of their garden. Ancient gardens were spaces used for many activities, such as dining, intellectual practice, and religious rituals.

Curious Kids: How did the First Person Evolve?

We know humans haven’t always been around. After all, we wouldn’t have survived alongside meat-eating dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus rex.

Ring-like Structure on Ganymede May Have Been Caused by a Violent Impact

Researchers from Kobe University and the National Institute of Technology, Oshima College have conducted a detailed reanalysis of image data from Voyager 1, 2 and Galileo spacecraft in order to investigate the orientation and distribution of the ancient tectonic troughs found on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede.

Tracing Evolution From Embryo to Baby Star

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) took a census of stellar eggs in the constellation Taurus and revealed their evolution state.

“Woodhenge” Discovered in the Iberian Peninsula

Archaeologists conducting research in the Perdigões complex in the Évora district of the Iberian Peninsula has uncovered a “Woodhenge” monument.

New Fossil Discovery Shows How Ancient ‘Hell Ants’ Hunted With Headgear

Researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Rennes in France have unveiled a stunning 99-million-year-old fossil pristinely preserving an enigmatic insect predator from the Cretaceous Period -- a 'hell ant' (haidomyrmecine) -- as it embraced its unsuspecting final victim, an extinct relative of the cockroach known as Caputoraptor elegans.

Popular stories

Port Royal – The Sodom of the New World

Port Royal, originally named Cagway was an English harbour town and base of operations for buccaneers and privateers (pirates) until the great earthquake of 1692.

Matthew Hopkins – The Real Witch-Hunter

Matthew Hopkins was an infamous witch-hunter during the 17th century, who published “The Discovery of Witches” in 1647, and whose witch-hunting methods were applied during the notorious Salem Witch Trials in colonial Massachusetts.

Did Corn Fuel Cahokia’s Rise?

A new study suggests that corn was the staple subsistence crop that allowed the pre-Columbian city of Cahokia to rise to prominence and flourish for nearly 300 years.

The Real Dracula?

“Dracula”, published in 1897 by the Irish Author Bram Stoker, introduced audiences to the infamous Count and his dark world of sired vampiric minions.