Palaeontology

Archaeologists find an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks in Brazil

A study of the Serrote do Letreiro Site (meaning “Signpost Hill”) in Brazil’s Paraíba State has led to the discovery of an assemblage of petroglyphs alongside dinosaur tracks.

New discovery sheds light on the evolution of birds

Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Late Jurassic period, however, our knowledge of the initial stages of Avialae's evolution is limited due to a scarcity of Jurassic fossils.

World’s oldest ‘stomach stone’ fossil found on Jurassic Coast

Palaeontologists have discovered a 150-million-year-old stomach stone on England’s Jurassic Coast.

Predatory dinosaurs such as T. rex sported lizard-like lips

A new study suggests that predatory dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus rex, did not have permanently exposed teeth as depicted in films such as Jurassic Park, but instead had scaly, lizard-like lips covering and sealing their mouths.

Ichthyosaur found on remote Artic island upends previous evolutionary theory

Palaeontologists have found the remains of an Ichthyosaur on the island of Spitsbergen, located in the Svalbard archipelago in northern Norway.

New Paranthropus Fossils Revealed

A South African cave has revealed 14 new fossils for palaeoanthropological analysis which are discussed by Pickering et al (2012) published in the Journal of Human Evolution.

Squid ink from Jurassic period identical to modern squid ink, U.Va. study shows

An international team of researchers, including a University of Virginia professor, has found that two ink sacs from 160-million-year-old giant cephalopod fossils discovered two years ago in England contain the pigment melanin, and that it is essentially identical to the melanin found in the ink sac of a modern-day cuttlefish.

New coelacanth find rewrites history of the ancient fish

Coelacanths, an ancient group of fishes once thought to be long extinct, made headlines in 1938 when one of their modern relatives was caught off the coast of South Africa. Now coelacanths are making another splash and University of Alberta researchers are responsible.

Rocks and clocks help unravel the mysteries of ancient Earth

Dating technicals that can be used for the identification of fossils offer a glimpse into life's origins and can calibrate the Earth’s evolutionary clock.

Ancient whale skulls and directional hearing: A twisted tale

Archaeocete, an ancient whale may have used skewed skulls for navigation when in water.

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