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African Trade Routes Sketched Out by Mediaeval Beads

The origin of glass beads dates back to early ancient times. The chemical composition of the beads and their morphological and technical characteristics can reveal where they come from; this information can then be used to reconstruct the trade channels between glass production areas and the sites where the beads were used at different times.

Early Human Landscape Modifications Discovered in Amazonia

In 2002 Professor Alceu Ranzi (Federal University of Acre) and Prof. Martti Parssinen (University of Helsinki) decided to form an international research team to study large geometric earthworks, called geoglyphs, at the Brazilian state of Acre in South-western Amazonia.

Archipelago in Ancient Doggerland Survived Storegga Tsunami 8,000-Years-Ago

Doggerland, dubbed “Britain’s Atlantis” is a submerged landmass beneath what is now the North Sea, that once connected Britain to continental Europe.

Ancient Blanket Made With 11,500 Turkey Feathers

The ancient inhabitants of the American Southwest used around 11,500 feathers to make a turkey feather blanket.

Photos of Stolen Mosaic Reveals Oldest Representation of Roman Hydraulic Wheel

Researchers from the University of Warsaw have determined that a mosaic stolen from Apamea in present-day Syria is the oldest representation of a Roman hydraulic water wheel.

The Unique Hydraulics in the Barbegal Water Mills, the World’s First Industrial Plant

The Barbegal watermills in southern France are a unique complex dating back to the 2nd century AD. The construction with 16 waterwheels is, as far as is known, the first attempt in Europe to build a machine complex on an industrial scale.

Archaeologists Discover Viking Ship Burial

Archaeologists conducting a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) study of an Iron Age funerary mound have discovered evidence of a previously unknown Viking ship burial in Gjellestad, Norway.

Archaeologists Discover Treasure Trove of Metal Artefacts

Archaeologists excavating in the village of Poniatach Wielkie, within the Pułtusk County, Masovian Voivodeship, of east-central Poland have discovered hundreds of metal objects that date from the 11th / 12th-13th centuries.

Rare Ancient Child Burial Reveals 8,000-Year-Old Secrets of the Dead

Archaeologists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered a rare child burial dating back 8,000 years on Alor Island, Indonesia.

Population Dynamics And the Rise of Empires in Inner Asia

From the late Bronze Age until the Middle Ages, the eastern Eurasian Steppe was home to a series of organized and highly influential nomadic empires.

Early Big-Game Hunters of the Americas Were Female According to Research

For centuries, historians and scientists mostly agreed that when early human groups sought food, men hunted and women gathered.

New Study Fills Gaps in Chronological Timelines of Bronze and Iron Age Societies

An examination of two documented periods of climate change in the greater Middle East, between approximately 4,500 and 3,000 years ago, reveals local evidence of resilience and even of a flourishing ancient society despite the changes in climate seen in the larger region.