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Archaeologists Discover Single-Edged Sword, Spears & Relics from Ancient Cemetery

Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology at the University of Kraków have made several discoveries of spearheads, clasps for fastening clothes, a richly ornamented spindle, iron needles, and a single-edged sword whilst conducting excavations of a graveyard site in Bejsce, Poland.

Researchers believe the site may be associated with the Przeworsk culture, an Iron Age society that dates from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD from central and southern Poland.

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The culture’s decline in the late 5th century coincides with the invasion of the Huns. Other factors may have included the social crisis that occurred as a result of the collapse of the Roman world and the trade contacts it maintained with peoples beyond its borders.

Image Credit : J. Bulas

The burials were discovered in a damaged state, located in farmland around the village of Bejsce. But despite the level of disturbance due to agricultural activity, the archaeologists were able to unearth a perfectly preserved single-edged sword. This was due to the funerary practices of a cremation burial that protected the sword’s iron against progressive corrosion.

Among other military items found are spearheads, which, according to contemporary accounts were the preferred weapons of the tribes inhabiting the areas on the Vistula River during the Iron Age.

Archaeologists also discovered several women’s burials containing fibules (clasps used to fasten garments) and items relating to weaving, such as a richly ornamented spindle decorated with stripes.

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PAP

Header Image Credit : J. Bulas

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Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan is multi-award-winning journalist and the Managing Editor at HeritageDaily. His background is in archaeology and computer science, having written over 7,500 articles across several online publications. Mark is a member of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), the World Federation of Science Journalists, and in 2023 was the recipient of the British Citizen Award for Education, the BCA Medal of Honour, and the UK Prime Minister's Points of Light Award.
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