New protocol identifies fascinating quantum states

Related Articles

Related Articles

Nowadays, modern quantum simulators offer a wide range of possibilities to prepare and investigate complex quantum states.

They are realized with ultracold atoms in optical lattices, Rydberg atoms, trapped ions or superconducting quantum bits. A particularly fascinating class of quantum states are topological states of matter. David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2016 for their theoretical discovery.

These states of matter are characterized by nonlocal quantum correlations and are particularly robust against local distortions that inevitably occur in experiments. “Identifying and characterizing such topological phases in experiments is a great challenge,” say Benoît Vermersch, Jinlong Yu and Andreas Elben from the Center for Quantum Physics at the University of Innsbruck and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. “Topological phases cannot be identified by local measurements because of their special properties. We are therefore developing new measurement protocols that will enable experimental physicists to characterize these states in the laboratory”.

In recent years this has already been achieved for non-interacting systems. However, for interacting systems, which in the future could also be used as topological quantum computers, this has not been possible so far.

With random measurements to a definite result


Subscribe to more articles like this by following our Google Discovery feed - Click the follow button on your desktop or the star button on mobile. Subscribe

In Science Advances, the physicists of Peter Zoller’s research group now propose measurement protocols that enable the measurement of so-called topological invariants. These mathematical expressions describe common properties of topological spaces and make it possible to fully identify interacting topological states with global symmetry in one-dimensional, bosonic systems.

“The idea of our method is to first prepare such a topological state in a quantum simulator. Now so-called random measurements are performed, and topological invariants are extracted from statistical correlations of these random measurements,” explains Andreas Elben.

The specific feature of this method is that although the topological invariants are highly complex, non-local correlation functions, they can still be extracted from statistical correlations of simple, local random measurements.

As with a method recently presented by the research group for comparing quantum states in computers or simulators, such random measurements are possible in experiments today. “Our protocols for measuring the topological invariants can therefore be directly applied in the existing experimental platforms,” says Benoît Vermersch.

UNIVERSITY OF INNSBRUCK

Header Image – A particularly fascinating class of quantum states are topological states of matter. Credit : IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch

- Advertisement -

Download the HeritageDaily mobile application on iOS and Android

More on this topic

LATEST NEWS

Study Suggests the Mystery of The Lost Colony of Roanoke Solved

The Roanoke Colony refers to two colonisation attempts by Sir Walter Raleigh to establish a permanent English settlement in North America.

Drones Map High Plateaus Basin in Moroccan Atlas to Understand Human Evolution

Researchers from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) have been using drones to create high-resolution aerial images and topographies to compile maps of the High Plateaus Basin in Moroccan Atlas.

The Kerguelen Oceanic Plateau Sheds Light on the Formation of Continents

How did the continents form? Although to a certain extent this remains an open question, the oceanic plateau of the Kerguelen Islands may well provide part of the answer, according to a French-Australian team led by the Géosciences Environnement Toulouse laboratory.

Ancient Societies Hold Lessons for Modern Cities

Today's modern cities, from Denver to Dubai, could learn a thing or two from the ancient Pueblo communities that once stretched across the southwestern United States. For starters, the more people live together, the better the living standards.

Volubilis – The Ancient Berber City

Volubilis is an archaeological site and ancient Berber city that many archaeologists believe was the capital of the Kingdom of Mauretania.

Pella – Birthplace of Alexander The Great

Pella is an archaeological site and the historical capital of the ancient kingdom of Macedon.

New Argentine fossils uncover history of celebrated conifer group

Newly unearthed, surprisingly well-preserved conifer fossils from Patagonia, Argentina, show that an endangered and celebrated group of tropical West Pacific trees has roots in the ancient supercontinent that once comprised Australia, Antarctica and South America, according to an international team of researchers.

High-tech CT reveals ancient evolutionary adaptation of extinct crocodylomorphs

The tree of life is rich in examples of species that changed from living in water to a land-based existence.

Fish fossils become buried treasure

Rare metals crucial to green industries turn out to have a surprising origin. Ancient global climate change and certain kinds of undersea geology drove fish populations to specific locations.

Archaeologists Discover Viking Toilet in Denmark

Archaeologists excavating a settlement on the Stevns Peninsula in Denmark suggests they have discovered a toilet from the Viking Age.

Popular stories