Dig Hill 80 – The final push to record a WW1 Battlefield site

Related Articles

Related Articles

An archaeology Kickstarter campaign is trying to raise the funds to record the unique archaeology of a WW1 Battlefield site.

In 2015, a team of archaeologists uncovered a WW1 German strongpoint at a ridge summit called “Hill 80” near the village of Wijtschate in Belgium.

The discovery revealed a trench fortress, virtually untouched since the conclusion of the Great War that also incorporated the adjacent farm buildings to create a formidable redoubt.

 

Hill 80 was eventually taken on June 1917, in the Battle of Messines, but poignantly, the 2015 excavations also encountered the remains of soldiers where they fell, both British and German.

Creator of the Kickerstarter Campaign, Simon Verdegem was part of the initial excavation team, alongside Peter Doyle, a leading military historian from the UK and Robin Schäfer an expert of the German army of both world wars.

Their Kickstart campaign explains:

“Hundreds of casualties were suffered in the first of weeks of November 1914, most of which have no known grave. They still lie in the fields and gardens in and around Wijtschaete. With your help we might be able to give some of them an identity and a proper burial.

With your support, we plan to excavate the site and expose the battlefield in order to increase our understanding of the trench war, and of the men who fought there – before the site is lost to housing development.”

“Given the importance and unique character of this site, it requires a full-scale excavation. There should be no half measures. Without it, this unique historic resource remains under threat – as it is unlikely a commercial site investigation, which precedes a housing development, will uncover the depth of detail this site deserves.”

This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by . – You can support the project through the widget below:

Header Image Credit – Isidre blanc

Download the HeritageDaily mobile application on iOS and Android

More on this topic

LATEST NEWS

50 Million-Year-Old Fossil Assassin Bug Has Unusually Well-Preserved Genitalia

The fossilized insect is tiny and its genital capsule, called a pygophore, is roughly the length of a grain of rice.

Dinosaur-Era Sea Lizard Had Teeth Like a Shark

New study identifies a bizarre new species suggesting that giant marine lizards thrived before the asteroid wiped them out 66 million years ago.

The Iron Age Tribes of Britain

The British Iron Age is a conventional name to describe the independent Iron Age cultures that inhabited the mainland and smaller islands of present-day Britain.

Cretaceous Amber Fossil Sheds Light on Bioluminescence in Beetles

Bioluminescence has fascinated people since time immemorial. The majority of organisms able to produce their own light are beetles, specifically fireflies, glow-worm beetles, and their relatives.

The Ancient Egyptian Pyramids

The Egyptian Pyramids are described as pyramid-shaped monuments, constructed mostly as funerary tombs and ceremonial complexes for the departed pharaohs during the Old Kingdom (2575 BC to 2150 BC) and Middle Kingdom (2050-1550 BC) periods.

Archaeologists Excavating Anglo-Saxon Cemetery Reveal 3000 Ornate Grave Goods

A team from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) have excavated the largest Anglo-Saxon cemetery in Northamptonshire at Overstone Gate.

New Archaeology for Anthropocene Era

Indiana Jones and Lara Croft have a lot to answer for. Public perceptions of archaeology are often thoroughly outdated, and these characterisations do little to help.

Researchers Rewind the Clock to Calculate Age & Site of Supernova Blast

Astronomers are winding back the clock on the expanding remains of a nearby, exploded star.

Popular stories

The Iron Age Tribes of Britain

The British Iron Age is a conventional name to describe the independent Iron Age cultures that inhabited the mainland and smaller islands of present-day Britain.

The Roman Conquest of Wales

The conquest of Wales began in either AD 47 or 48, following the landing of Roman forces in Britannia sent by Emperor Claudius in AD 43.

Vallum Antonini – The Antonine Wall

The Antonine Wall (Vallum Antonini) was a defensive wall built by the Romans in present-day Scotland, that ran for 39 miles between the Firth of Forth, and the Firth of Clyde (west of Edinburgh along the central belt).

Vallum Aulium – Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall (Vallum Aulium) was a defensive fortification in Roman Britannia that ran 73 miles (116km) from Mais at the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea to the banks of the River Tyne at Segedunum at Wallsend in the North Sea.