Date:

56 embalming jars for the mummification of high Vizier found at Deir el-Bahari

An excavation project by a joint Egyptian and Spanish archaeological mission from University of Alcalá has uncovered 56 embalming jars for the mummification of the vizier Ipi.

Image Credit : Ministry of Antiquities

The jars were discovered whilst the team was carrying out works on Ipi’s tomb (TT 315) at Deir el-Bahari in Luxor. Ipi was an Ancient Egyptian vizier and overseer of Thebes during the reign of Amenemhat I in the early Twelfth Dynasty (Early Middle Kingdom).

Dr. Mahmoud Afifi (Ancient Egyptian Antiquities) explained that the jars were found whilst clearing a courtyard in the tomb that led to the discovery of an auxiliary chamber located on its north east corner containing the jars. He noted that the jars had previously been discovered by the American Egyptologist Herbert Winlock between 1921-1922, who must have placed them in the room where they remained forgotten and reburied.

Afifi added that “the identification of these materials is of great importance for understanding the mummification techniques used in the early Middle Kingdom and the assessment of the kinds of items, tools, and substances involved in the process of embalming.”

- Advertisement -

Dr. Antonio Morales (Spanish Mission) said that the deposit of the mummification materials used for Ipi include inscriptions, various shrouds and linen sheets (4m long) shawls, and rolls of wide bandages, in addition to pieces of slender wrappings destined to cover fingers, toes, and other parts of the vizier’s corpse.

Morales explained that the jars contain around 300 sacks with natron salt, oils, sand, and other substances, as well as the stoppers of the jars and a scraper. Also found are examples of Nile clay and Marl jars, some with postmarks and hieratic.

Ministry of Antiquities

- Advertisement -
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan is multi-award-winning journalist and the Managing Editor at HeritageDaily. His background is in archaeology and computer science, having written over 7,500 articles across several online publications. Mark is a member of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), the World Federation of Science Journalists, and in 2023 was the recipient of the British Citizen Award for Education, the BCA Medal of Honour, and the UK Prime Minister's Points of Light Award.

Mobile Application

spot_img

Related Articles

Study uses satellite imagery to identify over 1,000 Andean hillforts

A new study, published in the journal Antiquity, uses satellite imagery to survey hillforts known as pukaras in the Andean highlands.

Roman defensive spikes unveiled at the Leibniz Centre for Archaeology

In 2023, archaeologists from Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main uncovered a series of wooden defensive spikes during excavations of a 1st century AD Roman fort in Bad Ems, western Germany.

Obsidian blade linked to Coronado’s expedition to find the fabled city of gold

Archaeologists suggest that a flaked-stone obsidian blade could be linked to the expedition led by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado to search for the fabled city of gold.

Clay seal stamp from First Temple period found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists have discovered a clay seal stamp from the First Temple period during excavations in the Western Wall Plaza, Jerusalem.

Offering of human sacrifices found at Pozo de Ibarra

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have uncovered an offering of human sacrifices at the Mexican town of Pozo de Ibarra.

Excavation uncovers preserved wooden cellar from Roman period

Archaeologists from the Frankfurt Archaeological Museum have uncovered a well-preserved wooden celler in Frankfurt, Germany.

Preserved temples from the Badami Chalukya era found in India

Archaeologists from the Public Research Institute of History, Archaeology, and Heritage (PRIHAH) have announced the discovery of two temples dating from the Badami Chalukya era.

Excavation of medieval shipbuilders reveals a Roman head of Mercury

Excavations of a medieval shipbuilders has led to the discovery of a Roman settlement and a Roman head of Mercury.