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“Iraq Heritage” launches to respect and protect the cultural heritage of modern Iraq

Iraq Heritage announces the official launch of www.iraqheritage.org, a website devoted to help people understand, value, care for and enjoy Iraq’s unique and ancient heritage.

Understanding this history and vast cultural legacy that Mesopotamia produced is necessary in order to respect and protect the cultural heritage of modern Iraq.

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The Iraq Heritage website provides information and resources on the Iraqi heritage and culture sector with particular emphasis on the all-important archaeological discoveries, heritage sites, caring for heritage, preserving future heritage sites, and the introduction of heritage into the education system. The site provides free for all membership. Visitors can help Iraq Heritage with its mission in the form of donations showing support for the cause.

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Iraq Heritage seeks to become the principal source of authoritative information and policy-making advice on reviving heritage and protecting areas that are at risk and presenting the true value of the ancient heritage of Iraq.

About Iraq Heritage:

Iraq Heritage was established in January 2013 as a limited company by guarantee and its registered office is located in the United Kingdom. Officially known as the Historic Buildings, Religious Shrines and Monuments Commission for Iraq, we are an executive Non-Departmental Public Body.

Iraq Heritage prides itself upon providing its clients with high quality impartial information, advice and guidance services. As founders, facilitators and organisers of the Iraq Heritage we aim to bring together annually the Iraqi Parliament, Government, Service Providers, Investors, and all the stakeholders who matter most in the development of Iraq.

Iraq Heritage is made up of leading Iraqi and international experts in the construction industry drawn from a variety of fields including industry professionals, finance and banking executives, Iraqi and multinational corporations, academics and scholars, and consultants and policy advisers.

For more information on Iraq Heritage, visit online at www.iraqheritage.org

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