Claims of Possible Burial Tomb Discovered in Machu Picchu

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Thanks to David Crespy’s intuition, a French Engineer visiting the Machu Picchu in Peru, Thierry Jamin, Archaeologist and Explorer, is about to make a major discovery at the most visited archaeological site in South America.

For more than fifteen years, French Archaeologist and adventurer, Thierry Jamin explores the jungle of South Peru, searching for clues of the permanent presence of the Incas in the Amazonian forest, and the legendary lost city of Paititi.

Doorway Credit : www.machupicchu-2012.

After the discovery of about thirty incredible archeological sites, located in the North of the department of Cuzco, between 2009 and 2011, which include several fortresses, burial and ceremonial, centers, and small Inca cities composed by hundreds of buildings, and many streets, passages, squares…

Thierry Jamin embarked on an incredible journey that led him to the heart of Machu Picchu – one of the best known and most popular of Peru’s visitor attractions. A few months ago, Thierry Jamin and his team think they have made an extraordinary archaeological discovery in the Inca city discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911.

This discovery was made possible thanks to the testimony of a French engineer who lives in Barcelona-Spain, David Crespy.


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In 2010, while he was visiting the lost city, David Crespy noticed the presence of a strange “shelter” located in the middle of the city, at the bottom of one of the main buildings. For him, there was no doubt about it, he was looking at a “door”, an entrance sealed by the Incas. In August 2011, David Crespy luckily learned about Thierry Jamin and his work in the French newspaper the Figaro magazine. Immediately he decided to contact the French researcher.

Photo: Thierry Jamin, in September, 2011)

Thierry Jamin, who has investigated several burial sites in the North of Cusco, listened carefully the story of David Crespy. Quickly he wants to confirm the facts behind the story.

Accompanied by archaeologists of the Regional Office of the Culture from Cusco, he was able to visit the site several times.

His preliminary findings are obvious: it is indeed an entrance, blocked by the Incas at an undetermined moment of History. The entrance is indeed strangely similar to what has been observed on burial sites, such as the ones Thierry Jamin and his companions often find in the valleys of Lacco and Chunchusmayo.

In December 2011, in order to confirm the existence of cavities in the basement of the building, Thierry and his team submit and official request to the Ministry of Culture in Lima, so they could perform a geophysical survey with the help of electromagnetic (EM) conductivity type of instruments.

This license was granted a few months later.

Credit : Macchu Picchu 2013 Program

Realized between April 9th and April 12th 2012, the electromagnetic survey not only confirmed the presence of an underground room but several! Just Behind the famous entrance, a staircase was also discovered. The two main paths seem to lead to specific chambers, including to the main squared one. The different techniques used by the French researcher(s), including a Molecular Frequencies Discriminator allowed them to highlight the presence of important archaeological materials, including deposits of metal and a large quantity of gold and silver!

Thierry Jamin is now preparing for the next step: The opening of the entrance sealed by the Incas more than five centuries ago. On May 22nd 2012, he officially submitted a request for authorization to the Peruvian authorities which would allow his team to proceed with the opening of the burial chambers. This project, “Machu Picchu 2012”, is now extended to a period of six months. At stake, an extraordinary archaeological treasure and some new revelations about the forgotten History of the Inca Empire. Soon you will see Machu Picchu from a brand new perspective since it could be the tomb of the Inca Emperor Pachacutec…

The Inkari Institute

Due to his success, in January, 2012, the French archaeologist Thierry Jamin had to transform his old non profit organization into a more solid organization : the “Instituto Inka of Investigación & Revaloración Indígena”, also called the Inkari Institute – Cusco. This non-governmental, non-profit organization, has for main mission the scientific research, the protection and the development of archeological sites existing on the Peruvian national territory.

http://www.instituto-inkari.org

Contributing Source : Inkari

Further Sources : http://www.machupicchu-2012.com/secret-room-machu-picchu-300.html

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