Archaeology

Archaeologists search for home of infamous Tower of London prisoner

A team of archaeologists are searching for the home of Sir Arthur Haselrig, a leader of the Parliamentary opposition to Charles I, and whose attempted arrest sparked the English Civil War.

Tartessian plaque depicting warrior scenes found near Guareña

Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology of Mérida (IAM) and the CSIC have uncovered a slate plaque depicting warrior scenes at the Casas del Turuñuelo archaeological site.

Archaeologists find a necropolis of stillborn babies

Excavations by the National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) have unearthed a necropolis for stillborn and young children in the historic centre of Auxerre, France.

Researchers find historic wreck of the USS “Hit ‘em HARDER”

The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) has confirmed the discovery of the USS Harder (SS 257), an historic US submarine from WWII.

Archaeologists uncover Roman traces of Vibo Valentia

Archaeologists from the Superintendent of Archaeology Fine Arts and Landscape have made several major discoveries during excavations of Roman Vibo Valentia at the Urban Archaeological Park.

Researchers document early, permanent human settlement in Andes

Using five different scientific approaches, a team including University of Wyoming researchers has given considerable support to the idea that humans lived year-round in the Andean highlands of South America over 7,000 years ago.

New bone identification method will help the study of past human societies

A new technique enabling archaeologists to distinguish between the bones of sheep and goats has been developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield.

Rare rock inscriptions discovered near El-Khawy

The archaeological mission From Yale University has discovered a new rock inscription site near the village of El-Khawy, approximately 7 kilometers north of the ancient city of Elkab during their excavation work on Elkab Desert Survey Project in collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities

Revealing the face of Tudor Dublin

In July 2014 archaeologists from Rubicon Heritage, monitoring Luas Cross City Utilities Works for GMC Ltd. on behalf of Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) uncovered a series of burials during works at College Green.

A wooden toe: Swiss Egyptologists study 3,000-year-old prosthesis

It is likely to be one of the oldest prosthetic devices in human history: Together with other experts, Egyptologists from the University of Basel have reexamined an artificial wooden big toe.

Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication

DNA found at archaeological sites reveals that the origins of our domestic cat are in the Near East and ancient Egypt.

Brewing Viking beer — with stones

When archaeologist Geir Grønnesby dug test pits at 24 different farms in central Norway, he nearly always found thick layers of fire-cracked stones dating from the Viking Age and earlier. Carbon-14 dating of this evidence tells us that ago, Norwegians brewed beer using stones.

Multispectral imaging reveals ancient Hebrew inscription undetected for over 50 years

Using advanced imaging technology, Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered a hitherto invisible inscription on the back of a pottery shard that has been on display at The Israel Museum for more than 50 years.

Archaeology excavation uncovers 14th century abbey precinct wall

Canterbury Archaeological Trust (CAT) has uncovered the footings of the St Augustine’s Abbey precinct wall, dating back to the 14th Century, on Canterbury Christ Church University’s North Holmes Campus.

Archaeologists discover that Montem Mound is “Prestigious” Saxon monument

Archaeologists have found that a 20-foot high mound in Slough, thought to be a Norman castle motte and for centuries the centrepiece of a bizarre Eton College ceremony, is actually a rare Saxon monument, built 1,500 years ago.

Archaeologists discover remains of ancient Aztec temple & ball court

Archaeologists have announced the discovery of a large circular temple, dedicated to the Aztec wind god Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatlin.

Earlier date for ancient wooden structures

Historic England’s Scientific Dating team have been running a project on the dating of the Late Neolithic palisaded enclosures around West Kennet in Wiltshire.

Rare glass spearhead found on Rottnest Island

Staff and students from The University of Western Australia’s School of Indigenous Studies have made an exciting discovery during a University excursion on Rottnest Island (Wadjemup).

Ancient grain tells the tale of our ancestors’ cities

Archaeological digs in the Middle East have revealed the remains of ancient harvests that record how some of the world’s earliest cities grew and developed.

Erasing history: why Islamic State is blowing up ancient artefacts

One of the many tragedies that have unfolded in the wake of the Islamic State (IS) is their smashing of statues and the destruction of ancient archaeological sites. Indeed, the rapid and terrifying advance of the IS has proved fatal for much invaluable heritage.

Mobile Application

spot_img