Charles t. g. Clarke

Charles hails from Longford in the midlands of Ireland. From an early age, he developed an interest in general knowledge which morphed into Archaeology. He graduated with a B.Sc. In Applied Archaeology at the Institute of Technology Sligo, in 2011. His dissertation involved a class of Neolithic monument called an earthen embanked enclosure - the Irish equivalent of a henge. One module - World Archaeology - would determine his future however. After being introduced to Australopithecines, he was hooked ever since. In 2012, he graduated with an M.Sc. In Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology at the UCL Institute of Archaeology and Department of Anthropology. His masters dissertation focused upon specie-level signatures of mandibular 2nd molars around 2 million years of age. Now out of academia, he hopes to return and pursue a PhD. He maintains the Cennathis Youtube Channel, Blog, Podcast, Twitter and Facebook pages. He currently lives in the city of London, UK.

The Archaeology of Morphine – Michael Jackson’s Darkest Hours

Morphine is one of the most famous drugs in the world and has brought to an end, the lives of some of the most famous people on the planet. Morphine abuse is news nearly every day of the year throughout the world. Written by Charles T. G. Clarke

Paranthropus – Our “near human” Cousin

Most palaeoanthropologists consider the robust australopithecines to be an offshoot of the gracile australopithecines and most are in agreement that the former deserve a separate genus – Paranthropus. This is currently up for debate because we now realise that there could be more to hominin evolution on the African continent than the fossil record is leading us to believe.

A Fossil Fox With A Difference

The palaeoanthropological community got excited with the discovery of new hominin fossils at the site of Malapa, in South Africa, over two years ago.

The Greek Crisis: Palaeoanthropology and Archaeology

Greece has been in the grip of a financial crisis for the last few years now and Greek heritage sites are hit the worst....

Kenyan Miocene Ape could be our ancesters

A team of palaeontologists have found evidence linking a fossil primate to modern day hominoids (known colloquially as apes).

New Paranthropus Fossils Revealed

A South African cave has revealed 14 new fossils for palaeoanthropological analysis which are discussed by Pickering et al (2012) published in the Journal of Human Evolution.