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Ming Dynasty palace ruins found in Forbidden City

Ruins of large palace buildings dating back to the early Ming Dynasty have been uncovered at the Cining Palace square’s Changxin gate.

The relics of wall base and pile cap from the early Ming Dynasty are discovered in the Palace Museum in Beijing - Credit : Xinhua
The relics of wall base and pile cap from the early Ming Dynasty are discovered in the Palace Museum in Beijing – Credit : Xinhua

It is the first time that a wall base and building foundations from that period have been found in the Forbidden City.

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They were unearthed at the gate’s northwest side before being resealed by the Palace Museum’s archaeology institute.

According to the museum, archaeological workers found 30 centimetres of thick rammed earth from the Ming Dynasty inside the 2.5-meter-wide and 5.4-meter-long trial pit at the Cining Palace area.

Shan Jixiang, the Palace Museum’s curator said the museum would show the ruins to the public by building glass floors in the future to present a more multi-dimensional Palace Museum.

 

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Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan
Mark Milligan is multi-award-winning journalist and the Managing Editor at HeritageDaily. His background is in archaeology and computer science, having written over 7,500 articles across several online publications. Mark is a member of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW), the World Federation of Science Journalists, and in 2023 was the recipient of the British Citizen Award for Education, the BCA Medal of Honour, and the UK Prime Minister's Points of Light Award.
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