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Archaeology

DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe
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DNA Find Reveals New Insights into the History of Cattle in Europe

July 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A research team from the University of Basel uncovered some interesting findings in a Neolithic settlement at the boarders of Lake Biel in Switzerland: The DNA of a cattle bone displays genetic traces of the European aurochs and...
Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
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Earlier Stone Age artefacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa

July 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South America have provided tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artefacts, including items such as hand axes. These artefacts were unearthed by...
3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage
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3-D image of Palaeolithic child’s skull reveals trauma, brain damage

July 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
3-D imaging provides researchers with brand new insights into Palaeolithic child’s skull...
The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic Groups is specified by flint
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The economic territory of Upper Palaeolithic Groups is specified by flint

July 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Research conducted by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has determined, on the basis of the Ametzagaina site, the mobility patterns and management of lithic resources....
Little too late: Researchers identify disease that may have plagued 700 year-old-skeleton
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Little too late: Researchers identify disease that may have plagued 700 year-old-skeleton

July 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old-skeleton discovered in the ruins of a Medieval Italian...
Prehistoric ‘bookkeeping’ continued long after invention of writing
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Prehistoric ‘bookkeeping’ continued long after invention of writing

July 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An archaeological dig in the southeast of Turkey has unveiled a considerable number of clay tokens that were used as records of trade until the advent of writing, or so it was...
The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue
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The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue

July 11th, 2014 | by Andy Brockman
As Christie's sell the statue of Sekhemka for £15.7 million, world famous graphic novelist Alan Moore torpedoes a key Government culture policy, the International Council of Museums condemns Northampton's sale of the statue and...
Archaeologists have unearthed a bath house at Segedunum Roman Fort after years of speculation
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Archaeologists have unearthed a bath house at Segedunum Roman Fort after years of speculation

July 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The mystery of a bath house buried underneath an ancient Roman fort has finally been discovered after years of speculation in a recent...
World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean Island
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World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean Island

July 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
World’s Earliest Erotic Graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean...
Cache of Roman and Corieltavi Iron Age coins discovered in cave
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Cache of Roman and Corieltavi Iron Age coins discovered in cave

July 7th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
An excavation in Dovedale, Derbyshire by archaeologists from the National Trus, Leicester University and the Defence Archaeology Group (Operation Nightingale) has unearthed a hoard of Late Iron Age and Republican Roman coins, the...
New archaeological find could shed light on late-Roman Britain
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New archaeological find could shed light on late-Roman Britain

July 6th, 2014 | by heritagedaily
A unique archaeological find uncovered near the site of a Roman villa in Dorset could help to shed light on the rural elite of late-Roman Britain...
Hair from mummy’s clothes provides insights into red deer lineage
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Hair from mummy’s clothes provides insights into red deer lineage

July 3rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Hair from mummy’s clothes provides insights into red deer...
Siberian Bronze Age skull reveals secrets of ancient society
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Siberian Bronze Age skull reveals secrets of ancient society

July 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Unlike most hunter-gatherer societies of the Bronze Age, the people of the Baikal region of modern Siberia (Russia) respected their dead with formal graves....
Ten Must See Iron Age Hill Forts In Britain
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Ten Must See Iron Age Hill Forts In Britain

July 1st, 2014 | by heritagedaily
A hill fort is a type of earthworks used as a fortified refuge or defended...
Baby boom in North American history between 500 to 1300 A.D.
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Baby boom in North American history between 500 to 1300 A.D.

June 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Washington State University researchers have sketched out one of the greatest baby booms in North American history, a centuries-long "growth blip" among southwestern Native Americans between 500 to 1300...
Archaeo-astronomy Steps out from the Shadows of the Past
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Archaeo-astronomy Steps out from the Shadows of the Past

June 24th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeo-astronomy Steps out from the Shadows of the...
Humans have been changing Chinese environment for 3,000 years
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Humans have been changing Chinese environment for 3,000 years

June 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
For thousands of years, Mother Nature has taken the blame for tremendous human suffering caused by massive flooding along the Yellow River, long known in China as the “River of Sorrow” and “Scourge of the Sons of...
What Amino Acids in Shells tell us About Bronze Age People
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What Amino Acids in Shells tell us About Bronze Age People

June 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists at the University of York have conducted a study that has unveiled new information on the use of mollusc shells and personal adornments by people in the Bronze...
The “wonderful rubbish” of the Gilf Kebir desert
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The “wonderful rubbish” of the Gilf Kebir desert

June 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A chance find in a site known as the Cave of Swimmers adds a colourful twist to an exhibition in Paris celebrating the work of ethnographer Leo Frobenius in raising awareness of the rock art of Africa....
A genetic study rebuilds the history of Pre-Columbian and present-day Mexican populations
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A genetic study rebuilds the history of Pre-Columbian and present-day Mexican populations

June 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A genetic study published in the journal Science rebuilds the history of Mexican Pre-Columbian populations and characterises the genetic structure of present-day Mexican...
Military memories of the First World War in the Yorkshire Dales
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Military memories of the First World War in the Yorkshire Dales

June 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Military memories of the First World War are being brought to life in a special community archaeology project supported by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority...
Archaeologists back on site to excavate Roman Temple
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Archaeologists back on site to excavate Roman Temple

June 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Commissioned by the Senhouse Museum Trust, the team of archaeologists and volunteers is led by Newcastle University’s Professor Ian Haynes and site director Tony Wilmott. This is the fourth year of a five year programme of...
Preserving the Battle of Hastings from “contamination”
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Preserving the Battle of Hastings from “contamination”

June 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Battle of Hastings is regularly fought all over again by enthusiastic re-enactors, before large crowds of spectators. The problem is that they are depositing material that could compromise the archaeology of the historic...
Ancient Roman Sanctuary Discovered in France
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Ancient Roman Sanctuary Discovered in France

June 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In Northern France’s Picardy region about 35 kilometers north of Paris in the city of Pont-Sainte-Maxence, archeologists have uncovered an ancient Roman sanctuary dating back to the second century, which has no equivalent in...
Seafarers brought Neolithic culture to Europe, gene study indicates
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Seafarers brought Neolithic culture to Europe, gene study indicates

June 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
How the Neolithic people found their way to Europe has long been a subject of debate. A study published June 6 of genetic markers in modern populations may offer some new...
Roman coins and brooches unearthed at Blackfriars in Leicester
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Roman coins and brooches unearthed at Blackfriars in Leicester

June 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Wardell Armstrong Archaeology's excavation at Blackfriars has revealed its most interesting artefacts at the closing stages of the project – including a number of Roman coins and Roman and medieval brooches....
Lost Nazi Weather Station Kurt
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Lost Nazi Weather Station Kurt

June 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Few people would equate this place with World War II German Nazis. And yet in 1943 a U-Boat installed a German weather station code named "Kurt" in Martin Bay, northern...
Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time
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Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time

June 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In the research, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, experts analysed samples from three sites located in the birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices: the Middle Euphrates basin and the oasis of Damascus, located in...
Early Bronze Age industrial, agricultural and domestic activity dating from up to 4,000 years ago discovered
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Early Bronze Age industrial, agricultural and domestic activity dating from up to 4,000 years ago discovered

June 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Evidence of industrial, agricultural and domestic archaeology, dating from up to 4,000 years ago has been found at the site of the Dyce Park and Choose and Dyce Drive link road...
Finding the lost art of Angkor Wat
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Finding the lost art of Angkor Wat

June 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Long-lost paintings have been discovered on the walls of Cambodia's ancient Angkor Wat temple, thanks to the keen observations of an Australian National University (ANU)...
Gilded female figure gives a glimpse of the Viking Age
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Gilded female figure gives a glimpse of the Viking Age

June 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Dating from around 800AD, archaeologists believe the figurine now names the Revninge - woman, may depict the goddess Freya by the hand posture holding the stomach. Other interpretations include the Norns, Diser , vølver or...
Free online course explores Hadrian’s Wall
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Free online course explores Hadrian’s Wall

June 3rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Newcastle University is bringing learners around the world to Hadrian’s Wall with its first ever free online course on the FutureLearn social learning platform....
Skeleton discovered may be Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson
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Skeleton discovered may be Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson

May 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A skeleton discovered on an archaeological dig in East Lothian may be that of Olaf Guthfrithsson - an Irish Viking who was the King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941 – or a member of his...
The engraved rocks of Montravail
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The engraved rocks of Montravail

May 30th, 2014 | by Sebastien Perrot Minnot
Rock art represents an important aspect of the Pre-Columbian heritage of the Lesser Antilles, where it appears, mainly, in the form of petroglyphs....
New 3D representation of Richard III’s spine shows ‘spiral nature’ of his scoliosis
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New 3D representation of Richard III’s spine shows ‘spiral nature’ of his scoliosis

May 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Shakespeare may have characterised Richard III as a hunchback, but now everyone can explore the true shape of one of history’s most famous spinal...
Domestication of Dogs May Explain Mammoth Kill Sites and the Success of Early Modern Humans
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Domestication of Dogs May Explain Mammoth Kill Sites and the Success of Early Modern Humans

May 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new analysis of European archaeological sites containing large numbers of dead mammoths and dwellings built with mammoth bones has led Penn State Professor Emerita Pat Shipman to formulate a new interpretation of how these...
A study describes agronomic conditions in ancient Near East 12,000 years ago
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A study describes agronomic conditions in ancient Near East 12,000 years ago

May 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A study from the University of Barcelona, University of Lleida (UdL) and Agrotecnio, describes the characteristics of agriculture at its beginnings by comparing kernel and wood samples from ancient Near East sites —the...
Cod bones reveal 13th century origin of global fish trade
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Cod bones reveal 13th century origin of global fish trade

May 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
London's international fish trade can be traced back 800 years to the medieval period through a study by archaeologists of Cod bones....
Archaeologists discover 800 year old seal stamped by the Monastery of St. Sabas
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Archaeologists discover 800 year old seal stamped by the Monastery of St. Sabas

May 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A rare seal of the Monastery of St. Sabas was excavated in the Bayit VeGan quarter in Jerusalem. The seal was unearthed a year and a half ago, but it was only after processing and studying the material that it was identified as a...
London’s Lost Castles
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London’s Lost Castles

May 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Tower of London is symbolic to many tourists and Londoners alike as a landmark of London's historic past, but the Tower isn't the only castle built to defend central London from...