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Archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at the ancient Egyptian site of Deir el-Medina
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Archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at the ancient Egyptian site of Deir el-Medina

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
By combining an analysis of written artifacts with a study of skeletal remains, Stanford postdoctoral scholar Anne Austin is creating a detailed picture of care and medicine in the ancient...
Archaeologists race against time to explore Neanderthal site
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Archaeologists race against time to explore Neanderthal site

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
University of Southampton archaeologists are working to save important Palaeolithic remains at a rare Neanderthal site, before they are lost to the forces of...
THE – The Heritage Explorer (Magazine) Crowdfunder
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THE – The Heritage Explorer (Magazine) Crowdfunder

November 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Support us in launching a printed magazine that explores the history, archaeology, travel, culture and exploration of the...
Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’
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Prehistoric farming on the ‘roof of the world’

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Animal teeth, bones and plant remains have helped researchers from Cambridge, China and America to pinpoint a date for what could be the earliest sustained human habitation at high...
Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain
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Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Las Médulas in León is considered to be the largest opencast goldmine of the Roman Empire, but the search for this metal extended many kilometres further south-east to the Erica river valley....
Anthropologist uncovers issues of gender inequality in archaeology journals
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Anthropologist uncovers issues of gender inequality in archaeology journals

November 20th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
On an archaeology field trip in New Mexico as an undergraduate in 2006, Dana Bardolph noticed something that struck her as an odd gender imbalance: The professor leading the dig was a men, while the graduate assistant and all but...
Dating of Viking fortress could suggest it belonged to Harald Bluetooth
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Dating of Viking fortress could suggest it belonged to Harald Bluetooth

November 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In September 2014, archaeologists from the Danish Castle Centre and Aarhus University announced the discovery of a Viking fortress in a field belonging to Vallø Manor, located west of Køge on the east coast of...
Climate change was not to blame for the collapse of the Bronze Age
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Climate change was not to blame for the collapse of the Bronze Age

November 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Scientists will have to find alternative explanations for a huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age as researchers prove definitively that climate change - commonly assumed to be responsible - could not...
New Research Focuses TIGHAR’s Underwater Search for Earhart Plane
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New Research Focuses TIGHAR’s Underwater Search for Earhart Plane

November 13th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Increasing confidence that a piece of aluminum aircraft debris found on a remote, uninhabited South Pacific atoll came from Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Electra has bolstered speculation that a sonar anomaly detected at a depth of...
The cave paintings of Valltorta-Gassulla could be dated in absolute terms thanks to new analyses
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The cave paintings of Valltorta-Gassulla could be dated in absolute terms thanks to new analyses

November 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers presented the first characterisation of the black pigments used in the shelters of the Remígia cave, in the Valltorta-Gassulla area, between the Valencian regions of L’Alt Maestrat and La Plana (Castelló)....
Too many people, not enough water: Now and 2,700 years ago
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Too many people, not enough water: Now and 2,700 years ago

November 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The Assyrian Empire once dominated the ancient Near East. At the start of the 7th century BC, it was a mighty military machine and the largest empire the Old World had yet seen....
Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska
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Archaeologists discover remains of Ice Age infants in Alaska

November 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The remains of two Ice Age infants, buried over 11,000 years ago at a site located in Alaska, represent the youngest human remains ever discovered in the northern part of North America, according to a new paper published in the...
Unique Roman Relief Discovered
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Unique Roman Relief Discovered

November 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Classical scholars from the Cluster of Excellence discover depiction of unknown god in Turkey – relics from 2,000 years of cult history...
The ‘Lost Diggers of Fromelles’: identifying and caring for the dead of the First World War
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The ‘Lost Diggers of Fromelles’: identifying and caring for the dead of the First World War

November 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Using DNA to identify the remains those long dead is about more than just the historical record; it can also be seen as an ‘act of care’, writes Jackie Leach Scully of Newcastle...
Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age
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Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

November 9th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A ground-breaking new study on DNA recovered from a fossil of one of the earliest known Europeans - a man who lived 36,000 years ago in Kostenki, western Russia - has shown that the earliest European humans' genetic ancestry...
2,000-year-old youth organization
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2,000-year-old youth organization

November 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In Roman Egypt, 14-year-old boys were enrolled in a youth organisation to learn to be good...
Population boom and droughts contributed to collapse of ancient Assyrian Empire
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Population boom and droughts contributed to collapse of ancient Assyrian Empire

November 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers see parallels between decline of Assyrian civilisation and today’s turmoil in Syria and...
How the Lusitania brought America into the First World War
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How the Lusitania brought America into the First World War

November 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
When the Lusitania left New York for Liverpool on what would be her final voyage on 1st May 1915, during the Great War, it would alter the course of history...
Archaeological glass artefacts shed new light on Swedish glass history
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Archaeological glass artefacts shed new light on Swedish glass history

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeological finds of glass material from Old Lödöse, a Swedish trade centre in the High Middle Ages, call for a revision of the country’s glass history. This is the conclusion of a doctoral thesis in archaeology from the...
University of Leicester archaeologists uncover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot
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University of Leicester archaeologists uncover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

October 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team has unveiled a matching set of decorated bronze parts from a 2nd or 3rd century BC Celtic chariot at Burrough Hill Iron Age...
Bespoke toilet seat company pledges funds towards preservation of ancient loo seat.
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Bespoke toilet seat company pledges funds towards preservation of ancient loo seat.

October 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
As world-wide interest in the discovery of an ancient toilet seat in Northumberland continues a bespoke toilet seat manufacturer Tosca & Willoughby based in Oxfordshire have stepped forward and pledged a cash sum towards its...
Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests
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Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

October 10th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon...
Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea
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Tracing our ancestors at the bottom of the sea

October 6th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New European Marine Board report recommends exploration of sea-submerged settlements abandoned by our ancestors....
UNCOVERING YEMEN
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UNCOVERING YEMEN

October 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
2500 years ago, frankincense and myrhh burned throughout the kingdoms of Southern Arabia. 50 years ago, Wendell Phillips unearthed the sand-covered ruins along the ancient incense trading...
Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age
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Hyperspectral imaging shines light on the early Finns’ life in the Stone Age

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The 5,500 years old clay figurines found at community excavations in Vantaa, Finland in summer 2014, were recently scanned with SPECIM’s hyperspectral camera....
Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project
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Science & Activism in the 21st Century : The Archaeoventurers Project

September 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The ArchaeoVenturers Project flips the script on traditional archaeology. ArchaeoVenturers Katie Paul (‘The Digger’) and Justine Benanty (‘The Diver’) explore the challenges facing our history today and the people who are...
Genetic Makeup of Europeans
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Genetic Makeup of Europeans

September 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers compare ancient hunter-gatherers and early farmers to present-day human genomes and find that Europeans today trace their ancestry to three ancient...
Innovative Stone Age tools were not African invention, say researchers
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Innovative Stone Age tools were not African invention, say researchers

September 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal...
Stone Age site challenges old archaeological assumptions about human technology
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Stone Age site challenges old archaeological assumptions about human technology

September 26th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Local innovation rather than the expansion of the population is the reason behind the appearance of new technologies in Eurasia over 300,000 years...
Gleaming in the Dust – Ancient Antiquities Looted & Sold on International Markets
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Gleaming in the Dust – Ancient Antiquities Looted & Sold on International Markets

September 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Gleaming in the Dust is a new audio documentary that reveals the extent to which ancient antiquities are being looted in Egypt and sold on international markets in London, Paris and New York....
Crossrail uncovers Brunel’s railway heritage
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Crossrail uncovers Brunel’s railway heritage

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Remains of structures built by celebrated engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel for his Great Western Railway have been unearthed near Paddington in west...
First World War dead commemorated in new online archive blog
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First World War dead commemorated in new online archive blog

September 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The University of Greenwich’s First World War casualties are being investigated in a new online project, with members of the public being urged to...
New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites ‘exhibit significant damage’
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New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites ‘exhibit significant damage’

September 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
In war-torn Syria, five out of six World Heritage sites now “exhibit significant damage” and some structures have even been “reduced to rubble”, according to new high-resolution satellite image analysis conducted by the...
‘Lost chapel’ skeletons found holding hands after 700 years
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‘Lost chapel’ skeletons found holding hands after 700 years

September 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Archaeologists from the University of Leicester uncover a trove of relics and remains at Chapel of St. Morrell in...
Iraq’s heritage faces new wave of destruction
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Iraq’s heritage faces new wave of destruction

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Since early June, extremist armed groups, including ISIS, have controlled most of north-west of Iraq, from Mosul downward to falouja on the Euphrates and Tikrit on the...
Analysis of centuries-old skeletons in mass grave ‘inconclusive’
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Analysis of centuries-old skeletons in mass grave ‘inconclusive’

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Further tests are to be carried out on skeletons recovered from a centuries-old mass grave in Durham...
Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after 5 centuries
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Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after 5 centuries

September 17th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
First partial sequence of an ancient pig...
Volunteers hope to unearth hidden history at medieval church in Hopton
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Volunteers hope to unearth hidden history at medieval church in Hopton

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Residents will seek to unearth hidden history at a community archaeological dig to be held at a medieval ruined church in...
NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate
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NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
San Francisco area divers provided valuable assistance to help identify long-lost...
The creation of the Vuoksi River preceded a significant cultural shift
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The creation of the Vuoksi River preceded a significant cultural shift

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The creation of the Vuoksi River and the subsequent rapid decrease in the water level of Lake Saimaa approximately 6,000 years ago revealed thousands of square kilometres of new, fertile land in eastern...