Dr Anwen Caffell lays out the remains.
CREDIT : Durham University / North News
03 Sep 2015

Skeletons found in mass graves are those of 17th century Scottish soldiers

Researchers at Durham University concluded that the identification of the remains as the Dunbar prisoners was “the only plausible explanation” when scientific data was analysed alongside historical information.

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Billy O Foghlu with ram's horn. CREDIT : Stuart Hay, ANU
03 Sep 2015

3-D printing revives Bronze Age music

Billy Ó Foghlú, from The Australian National University (ANU), has found evidence that the artifact may have been a mouthpiece from an iron-age horn and not a spear-butt as previously thought.

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Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) image of one of the twenty pieces of pottery found at the Wanelek site in New Guinea Highlands. Image : Gaffney
03 Sep 2015

Ancient new guinea pot makers surprising innovation

Archaeologists have unearthed the oldest known pottery from Papua New Guinea in a surprisingly remote location in the rugged highlands.

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sek1
24 Aug 2015

Final appeal to extend the export ban on Sekhemka

On Saturday 22 August the Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty told a press conference in Cairo that the sale of the statue of Sekhemka at Christie’s in July 2014 was an ”ethical crime”

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Image Credit : CrossRail
13 Aug 2015

Suspected plague pit from 1665 unearthed at Liverpool Street London

A mass burial site suspected of containing 30 victims of The Great Plague of 1665 has been unearthed at Crossrail’s Liverpool Street site in the City of London.

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Covenanters
Wood - Credit :  Dave Henniker
11 Aug 2015

Uncovering more about Scotland’s military history

Earlier this summer, historic training trenches outside Edinburgh were the focus for an important archaeological excavation to provide a greater understanding of Scotland’s military history.

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tikala1
11 Aug 2015

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning “First Mutal”.

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Image Credit : Tulane University
07 Aug 2015

Tulane archaeologists help unearth key Maya monuments

Archaeologists with the La Corona Regional Archaeological Project in Guatemala, who in 2012 discovered the second known reference to the so-called “end date” of the Maya calendar, have made more significant finds.

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Image Credit : Paul Stevenson
06 Aug 2015

Bones of the victims at Roman Herculaneum

Are human remains the archaeology of death or the archaeology of life? This strange paradox stated in Pearson (1999), addresses that the surviving bones, tissues and skin are more likely to reveal information about a person’s life, not a person’s death.

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Credit : Ministry of Antiquities
06 Aug 2015

Three newly discovered stelae at Wadi el-Hudi (Aswan)

Antiquities Minister, Dr. Mambouh Eldamaty announced the discovery of three inscribed stelae at Wadi El-Hudi.

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Credit : IAA
05 Aug 2015

Ancient Inscriptions and Symbols Discovered on Ritual Bath Dating to the Second Temple Period

An extraordinary find that has fired archaeologists’ imagination was discovered about two months ago in the Arnona quarter during a routine archaeological inspection by the Israel Antiquities Authority of the construction of a nursery school being built at the initiative of the Jerusalem municipality.

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Credit : Kinneret Regional Project
05 Aug 2015

Ancient Synagogue Mosaic Floor Showing Menorah Found in Galilee, Israel

Excavations in the ancient synagogue at Horvat Kur (Israel) dating to the Byzantine period (4th—7th c. CE) have uncovered a partially-preserved colorful mosaic floor.

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CITiZAN archaeologists recording 19th century - Credit : CITIZAN
05 Aug 2015

Urgent call for volunteers to survey England’s disappearing coastal archaeology

Thousands of archaeological sites along England’s coast and tidal estuaries are being destroyed by extreme weather, rising sea levels and tidal scour. CITiZAN, the Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network, is the first national community-led project to tackle the alarming threat to our heritage.

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Credit : Prof. Aren Maeir, Director, Ackerman Family Bar-Ilan University Expedition to Gath
04 Aug 2015

Archaeologists uncover entrance gate and fortification of Biblical city

The Ackerman Family Bar-Ilan University Expedition to Gath, headed by Prof. Aren Maeir, has discovered the fortifications and entrance gate of the biblical city of Gath of the Philistines, home of Goliath and the largest city in the land during the 10th-9th century BCE, about the time of the “United Kingdom” of Israel and King Ahab of Israel.

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The Death of Cleopatra by Guido Cagnacci, 1658 : Wiki Commons
04 Aug 2015

Was Cleopatra beautiful? The archaeological evidence

Cleopatra VII Philopator, commonly known simply as Cleopatra, ruled over Egypt during the century preceding the birth of Christ.

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Credit : University of Reading
28 Jul 2015

Skeleton Of Bronze Age Adolescent Discovered Near Stonehenge

A rare skeleton of a Bronze Age child has been found by University of Reading archaeologists excavating Wilsford Henge in the Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire.

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Keynsham Cemetery, which is built over the Roman Villa. Credit : WikiPedia
28 Jul 2015

Archaeological Investigation in Keynsham Cemetery

In 1877 the first vestiges of a large Roman building was identified during the construction of the mortuary chapels in the newly planned Durley Hill cemetery at Keynsham.

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sek1
28 Jul 2015

Last Gasp to Save Sekhemka

The Save the Sekhemka campaign has issued the following press release and statement, urging Prime Minister David Cameron to intervene.

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Image by Manuel Will
28 Jul 2015

Cave that carries evidence of humanity’s first cultural exploits is under threat

Sibudu, a rock shelter above the uThongathi River in KwaZulu-Natal, is one of South Africa’s most important archaeological sites. Its recent nomination for World Heritage status demonstrates that it is of universal value, with heritage that belongs to all humanity.

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vikin1
27 Jul 2015

New research on the causes of the Viking Age

The Viking hit-and-run raids on monastic communities such as Lindisfarne and Iona were the most infamous result of burgeoning Scandinavian maritime prowess in the closing years of the Eighth Century.

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Credit : Investigación y Desarrollo
22 Jul 2015

Deciphering of Mayan glyph

Deciphering of Mayan glyph, the finding provides a leap in understanding this culture.

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stone1
21 Jul 2015

Archaeologists use new methods to explore move from hunting, gathering to farming

One of the enduring mysteries of the human experience is how and why humans moved from hunting and gathering to farming.

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