opium1
28 Aug 2015

Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

One of the most pressing issues in modern biological conservation is “invasion biology”.

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MTA
28 Aug 2015

MTA: Andrew Reinhard

Today, we sit down and talk with ‘Punk Archaeologist’ and ‘Archaeogamer’, Andrew Reinhard. Links:  http://archaeogaming.com/ Andrew on Twitter: @Archaeogaming

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A malformed (’teratological’) chitinozoan specimen of the genus Ancyrochitina (a) and a morphologically normal specimen (b) of the same genus. Both of these Silurian microfossils are from the A1-61 well in Libya and are about 415 Ma old. Scale bars are 0.1 mm.
27 Aug 2015

Malformed fossil plankton reveal heavy metal pollution might have contributed to some of the largest extinction events

Metal poisoning caused the malformation observed in ancient organisms and may have contributed to their extinction and that of many other species.

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Complete left tusk of an ice-age Woolly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) from the Siberian Arctic on the Taimyr Peninsula. Each individual discovery increases our knowledge about the past distribution of these Ice Age giants. © R.-D. Kahlke/ Senckenberg Weimar
27 Aug 2015

Widest distribution of mammoths during the last Ice Age

Ice Age paleontologist Prof. Dr. Ralf-Dietrich Kahlke of the Senckenberg Research Station for Quaternary Paleontology in Weimar recorded the maximum geographic distribution of the woolly mammoth during the last Ice Age and published the most accurate global map in this regard.

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ice11
27 Aug 2015

New research sheds light on end of Snowball Earth period

The second ice age during the Cryogenian period was not followed by the sudden and chaotic melting-back of the ice as previously thought, but ended with regular advances and retreats of the ice, according to research published by scientists from the University of Birmingham in the journal Nature Geoscience.

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This is an illustration of Gueragama sulamerica, by Julius Csotonyi.
Credit : Julius Csotonyi
27 Aug 2015

Fossil remains of an Old World lizard overturn long-held hypothesis of lizard evolution

University of Alberta paleontologists have discovered a new species of lizard, namedGueragama sulamericana, in the municipality of Cruzeiro do Oeste in Southern Brazil in the rock outcrops of a Late Cretaceous desert, dated approximately 80 million years ago.

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ice1
27 Aug 2015

Lab experiments question popular measure of ancient ocean temperatures

Understanding the planet’s history is crucial if we are to predict its future. While some records are preserved in ice cores or tree rings, other records of the climate’s ancient past are buried deep in the seafloor.

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A fossilized Anchioris huxleyi, a bird-lke dinosaur, carries evidence of pigment and the subcellular organelles that made it. Credit : Thierry Hubin/RBINS
27 Aug 2015

Pigments, organelles persist in fossil feathers

A study provides multiple lines of new evidence that pigments and the microbodies that produce them can remain evident in a dinosaur fossil.

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This Eocene Antarctic fossil penguin skull was discovered at La Meseta Formation at Seymour Island.
CREDIT : Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
27 Aug 2015

New fossil skulls reveal insights about penguin brain evolution

When they’re not being the stars of various animated movies, penguins are playing an important role in evolutionary studies. Penguins are unique among modern birds in that they ‘fly’ through the water.

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chat
26 Aug 2015

AC: What is a Celt? Revisited

  Welcome to Archaeo-Chat. In this series we record unscripted conversations about archaeology, what it is like to be an archaeologist and related topics. Today, we re-visit the question – What is a Celt?

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Soup News
25 Aug 2015

Soup News: August 2015

Welcome to Soup News. Once a month we bring you a selection of news stories with comment and discussion from the folks at Archaeosoup Towers along with links to a selection of news from the rest of the month. 0:57 Liv: Danish ‘monster’ pulled out of Swedish waters: http://www.thelocal.se/20150812/danish-monster-pulled-out-of-swedish-waters Medieval

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sek1
24 Aug 2015

Final appeal to extend the export ban on Sekhemka

On Saturday 22 August the Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty told a press conference in Cairo that the sale of the statue of Sekhemka at Christie’s in July 2014 was an ”ethical crime”

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Archaefacts
24 Aug 2015

AF: Cosmetic Surgery

  Welcome to Archae-Facts, the place to find bite-sized chunks of Archaeological Trivia! Today, we consider the origins of plastic surgery…

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HUNTER
21 Aug 2015

Humans as predators: An unsustainable appetite for adults and carnivores

Humans are just one of many predators in this world, but a new study highlights how their intense tendency to target and kill adult prey, as well as other carnivores, sets them distinctly apart from other predators. As humans kill other species in their reproductive prime, there can be profound

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QoD
21 Aug 2015

QoD: Killing a Sword?

Welcome to Questions of Doom. In this series, we answer your questions about Archaeology and our shared heritage. Today, I tackle the reasons why people bend swords in graves? Links: Killing the Weapons. An Insight on Graves with Destroyed Weapons in Late Iron Age Transylvania: http://www.academia.edu/2024265/Killing_the_Weapons._An_Insight_on_Graves_with_Destroyed_Weapons_in_Late_Iron_Age_Transylvania Hidden Histories: Fake it

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SATURN1
19 Aug 2015

scientists think ‘planetary pebbles’ were the building blocks for the largest planets

Researchers at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and Queen’s University in Canada have unraveled the mystery of how Jupiter and Saturn likely formed. This discovery, which changes our view of how all planets might have formed, will be published in the Aug. 20 issue of Nature.

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Here is a comparison of morphology in UW 88-886 (left), P. angusticepts males (CO 100, center), and P. izodi males (TP 89-11-1, right). Credit : Wits University
19 Aug 2015

Earliest baboon found at Malapa

A team from Wits University’s Evolutionary Studies Institute has discovered a fossil monkey specimen representing the earliest baboon ever found.

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Image Credit : Hubble ESA
18 Aug 2015

Meteorite impacts can create DNA building blocks

A new study shown that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans may have created nucleobases and amino acids.

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Evidence of a massive injuries shortly before or after death: skull injury in an 8 year old child about. (Photo: PNAS, University of Basel)
18 Aug 2015

Massacres, torture and mutilation: Extreme violence in neolithic conflicts

Violent conflicts in Neolithic Europe were held more brutally than has been known so far.

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This is the first-ever discovery of a salamander preserved in amber, from an unlikely spot -- the Dominican Republic, where all salamanders are now extinct. Credit : Photo by George Poinar, Jr., courtesy of Oregon State University
17 Aug 2015

Discovery of a salamander in amber sheds light on evolution of Caribbean islands

More than 20 million years ago, a short struggle took place in what is now the Dominican Republic, resulting in one animal getting its leg bitten off by a predator just before it escaped. But in the confusion, it fell into a gooey resin deposit, to be fossilized and entombed forever in amber.

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This is the marine shell-crushing reptile Psephoderma alpinum, one of the last placodonts on Earth, just reported from Somerset. Credit : James O'Shea
17 Aug 2015

Ancient British shores teemed with life

The diversity of animal life that inhabited the coastlines of South West England 200 million years ago has been revealed in a study by an undergraduate at the University of Bristol.

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his is a large intact specimen of the fossil, Montsechia. Usually only small fragmentary pieces of the fossil are found. Credit : David Dilcher
17 Aug 2015

IU paleobotanist identifies what could be the mythical ‘first flower’

Indiana University paleobotanist David Dilcher and colleagues in Europe have identified a 125 million- to 130 million-year-old freshwater plant as one of earliest flowering plants on Earth.

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