archaeoscope
06 Jul 2015

AS: Stories of the Future.2

Welcome to Archaeo-Scope. In this series we take an archaeological perspective on modern culture; asking questions about current trends and observations from around the world. Today, I follow up on the question of when did human beings first start to tell stories of the future…

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d1
05 Jul 2015

How our early ancestors turned disability into advantage

A new evolutionary theory explains how critically small populations of early humans survived, despite an increased chance of hereditary disabilities being passed to offspring.

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Assaf Peretz IAI
05 Jul 2015

A Two Thousand Year Old Secret Below the Living Room Floor

An ancient, two thousand year old ritual bath (miqwe) was discovered below a living room floor during renovations carried out in a private house in the picturesque neighborhood of ‘Ein Kerem in Jerusalem.

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brandon1
03 Jul 2015

Exploring the West’s First and Second World War archaeology

Some of the West’s fascinating but lesser known wartime heritage has been explored by archaeologists from the University of Bristol: a Second World War ‘Stop Line’ built to protect Bristol, and practice trenches dug by First World War soldiers on Brandon Hill.

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Photo courtesy of Fred Spoor of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
03 Jul 2015

Ancient monkey brain revealed

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature’s tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.

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Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC
02 Jul 2015

First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic.

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smell1
02 Jul 2015

Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men

A group of scientists led by Dr Kara Hoover of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and including Professor Matthew Cobb of The University of Manchester, has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct human relative would have been able to smell.

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01 Jul 2015

Dagger-like Canines of Saber-toothed Cats Took Years to Grow

New research shows that the fearsome teeth of the saber-toothed cat Smilodon fatalis fully emerged at a later age than those of modern big cats, but grew at a rate about double that of their living relatives.

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01 Jul 2015

Injured service personnel to help uncover secrets of premier Roman site on Hadrian’s Wall

The annual excavations at the Roman fort of Vindolanda in Northumberland are starting this year with the help of some very special volunteers.

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bovid1
01 Jul 2015

New study shows South Africans using milk-based paint 49,000 years ago

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa has discovered a milk-and ochre-based paint dating to 49,000 years ago that inhabitants may have used to adorn themselves with or to decorate stone or wooden slabs.

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Archaefacts
01 Jul 2015

AF: Money for Old Rope?

Welcome to Archae-Facts, the place to find bite-sized chunks of Archaeological Trivia! Today, I examine the question – Just how old is rope anyway?

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triassic1
30 Jun 2015

Big dinosaurs steered clear of the tropics

For more than 30 million years after dinosaurs first appeared, they remained inexplicably rare near the equator, where only a few small-bodied meat-eating dinosaurs made a living.

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Collinsium ciliosum, a Collins’ monster-type lobopodian from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of China Credit: Jie Yang
30 Jun 2015

Spiky monsters: new species of ‘super-armoured’ worm discovered

A newly-identified species of spike-covered worm with legs, which lived 500 million years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour for protection.

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crater
30 Jun 2015

Researchers calculate amount of undiscovered meteorite impact sites on Earth’s surface

The geologists Prof. Dr. Stefan Hergarten and Prof. Dr. Thomas Kenkmann from the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Freiburg have published the world’s first study on the question of how many meteorite craters there should be on the Earth’s surface.

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lac2
30 Jun 2015

Earthquakes in western Solomon Islands have long history, study shows

Researchers have found that parts of the western Solomon Islands, a region thought to be free of large earthquakes until an 8.1 magnitude quake devastated the area in 2007, have a long history of big seismic events.

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natural1
29 Jun 2015

Extreme makeover: Mankind’s unprecedented transformation of Earth

Human beings are pushing the planet in an entirely new direction with revolutionary implications for its life, a new study by researchers at the University of Leicester has suggested.

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dino1
29 Jun 2015

New Sesotho-named dinosaur from South Africa

South African and Argentinian palaeontologists have discovered a new 200 million year old dinosaur from South Africa, and named it Sefapanosaurus, from the Sesotho word “sefapano”.

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new1
29 Jun 2015

Research shows how Spanish colonists changed life in the Middle Rio Grande Valley

Spanish settlement of the Middle Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico changed the way people lived, but a new paper in the journal “The Holocene” by UNM Assistant Professor of Anthropology Emily Jones, suggests the change did not come quickly.

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Soup News
29 Jun 2015

Soup News: June 2015

Welcome to Soup News. Once a month we bring you a selection of news stories with comment and discussion from the folks at Archaeosoup Towers along with links to a selection of news from the rest of the month.

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trade
29 Jun 2015

Tracking the fortunes of the UK antiques trade online

A new online, interactive map has been launched which tracks the development and history of the UK antiques trade during the 20th century.

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Courtesy of Robin Wordsworth Caption: Conceptual rendition of the competing warm and cold scenarios for early Mars
29 Jun 2015

Unveiling the ancient climate of Mars

The high seas of Mars may never have existed. According to a new study that looks at two opposite climate scenarios of early Mars, a cold and icy planet billions of years ago better explains water drainage and erosion features seen on the planet today.

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PEB1
26 Jun 2015

New data uncovered on Bronze Age humans’ diet and the arrival of new crops in the Iberian Peninsula

Researchers from the universities of Granada, Santiago de Compostela and Reading (UK) have studied human skeletal remains from the Cova do Santo collective burial cave in northwestern Spain.

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Hidden
26 Jun 2015

HH: Why 24 Hours yet 60 Minutes?

Welcome to Hidden Histories. In this series, we take a closer look at the world around us and explore the hidden depths of our shared history. Today we take a look at the clock and explore why there are twenty four hours in a day, yet 60 minutes in an

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This skull of a scarlet macaw (Ara macao) was excavated from Pueblo Bonito in New Mexico by researchers from the American Museum of Natural History in 1897. Credit : AMNH/D. Finnin
25 Jun 2015

Scarlet macaw skeletons point to early emergence of Pueblo hierarchy

New work on the skeletal remains of scarlet macaws found in an ancient Pueblo settlement indicates that social and political hierarchies may have emerged in the American Southwest earlier than previously thought.

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Credit : Simon Wakefield
25 Jun 2015

Exploring Ancient Life Under the Shadow of Stonehenge

Our knowledge of the people who worshiped at Stonehenge and worked on its construction is set to be transformed through a new project led by the University of Reading.

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Nils Knötschke from Dinosaur Park Münchehagen, excavating the footprints in 2003. In order to keep the footprints from breaking while they were chiseled out of the rock, they were coated in plaster before removing them. Photo: Holger Lüdtke/2003
24 Jun 2015

Researchers Reconstruct Dinosaur Tracks

Twelve years ago, footprints of carnivorous dinosaurs were discovered and excavated in a quarry near Goslar.

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This is Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513). The fossil is 15 mm long. Credit : Jean-Bernard Caron
24 Jun 2015

Newly found ring of teeth uncovers what common ancestor of molting animals looked like

A new study of an otherworldly creature from half a billion years ago – a worm-like animal with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has definitively identified its head for the first time, and revealed a previously unknown ring of teeth and a pair of simple eyes.

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This is a computer model and virtual development of the tooth plate of Romundina stellina, with colors gold through purple indicating the first up to the final tooth addition. Credit : Martin Rücklin, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
24 Jun 2015

Forgotten fossil indicates earlier origin of teeth

The tooth plate of just some millimeters in size had been in a box for more than 40 years, without being recognized after the discovery and preparation of the fish it belonged to.

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Credit : Erich Ferdinand
24 Jun 2015

Studies find early European had recent Neanderthal ancestor

In 2002, archaeologists discovered the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago. Geneticists have now analyzed ancient DNA from that jawbone and learned that it belonged to a modern human whose recent ancestors included Neanderthals.

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burke1
24 Jun 2015

Kennewick Man: Solving a scientific controversy

An 8,500-year-old male skeleton discovered in 1996 in Columbia River in Washington State has been the focus of a bitter dispute between Native Americans and American scientists, and even within the American scientific community.

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Photo: Prof. Israel Hershkovitz, Tel Aviv University
24 Jun 2015

400,000-year-old dental tartar provides earliest evidence of manmade pollution

Most dentists recommend a proper teeth cleaning every six months to prevent, among other things, the implacable buildup of calculus or tartar — hardened dental plaque. Routine calculus buildup can only be removed through the use of ultrasonic tools or dental hand instruments. But what of 400,000-year-old dental tartar?

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stone1
24 Jun 2015

Stone tools from Jordan point to dawn of division of labor

Thousands of stone tools from the early Upper Paleolithic, unearthed from a cave in Jordan, reveal clues about how humans may have started organizing into more complex social groups by planning tasks and specializing in different technical skills.

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rabbit
09 Jun 2015

What rabbits can tell us about Neanderthal extinction?

When thinking about the extinction of Neanderthals some 30,000 years ago, rabbits may not be the first thing that spring to mind. But the way rabbits were hunted and eaten by Neanderthals and modern humans – or not, as the case may be – may offer vital clues as to why one species died out while the other flourished.

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flood1
09 Jun 2015

Floods as war weapons

A new study shows that, from 1500 until 2000, about a third of floods in southwestern Netherlands were deliberately caused by humans during wartimes.

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hadron1
08 Jun 2015

Getting to the heart of the matter: CERN’s hidden heritage

A nuclear physicist and an archaeologist at the University of York have joined forces to produce a unique appraisal of the cultural significance of one of the world’s most important locations for scientific inquiry.

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pincio-park-sculpture
08 Jun 2015

The Shame of Art Vandalism in Rome

Rome is a city of great history, art and culture. Any visit should include the stunning attractions, museums and monuments, and witness great masterpieces like The Last Judgement at the Sistine Chapel, Bernini’s Altar at St Peter’s Basilica and She Wolf at the Capitoline Museums.

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tri1
08 Jun 2015

Paleo-engineering: New study reveals complexity of Triceratops’ teeth

When it comes to the three-horned dinosaur called the Triceratops, science is showing the ancient creatures might have been a little more complex than we thought.

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cell1
05 Jun 2015

New species of horned dinosaur with ‘bizarre’ features revealed

About 10 years ago, Peter Hews stumbled across some bones sticking out of a cliff along the Oldman River in southeastern Alberta, Canada.

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golda1
05 Jun 2015

Archaeologists discover evidence of prehistoric gold trade route

Archaeologists at the University of Southampton have found evidence of an ancient gold trade route between the south-west of the UK and Ireland. A study suggests people were trading gold between the two countries as far back as the early Bronze Age (2500BC).

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QoD
05 Jun 2015

QoD: Is the Past Static?

Welcome to Questions of Doom. In this series, we answer your questions about Archaeology and our shared heritage.

Today, we think about how the past relates to the present…

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