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How the British treated ‘hardcore’ Mau Mau women
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How the British treated ‘hardcore’ Mau Mau women

September 16th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New research on the treatment of 'hardcore' female Mau Mau prisoners by the British in the late 1950s sheds new light on how ideas about gender, deviancy and mental health shaped colonial practices of...
History of the peoples of Africa: the role of agriculture
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History of the peoples of Africa: the role of agriculture

September 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
What phenomenon enabled the demographic growth of Bantu farmers in Africa and led to their genetic differentiation from the Pygmy hunter-gatherer communities?...
Modern population boom traced to pre-industrial roots
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Modern population boom traced to pre-industrial roots

September 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
By the end of the Roman Empire, humanity had crossed a critical threshold of social organization that allowed more people to take advantage of economies of scale, says anthropologist Aaron Stutz. "The Consummation of Empire," by...
The nuclear legacy of Hiroshima is a global issue, how much of it is a trauma for everybody?
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The nuclear legacy of Hiroshima is a global issue, how much of it is a trauma for everybody?

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Speaking in Hiroshima in the weeks preceding the sixty-ninth anniversary of the bombing of the city, Yoko Ono stood up for peace declaring that ‘No More Hiroshima’ is a global issue....
Huddersfield researcher traces Jack the Ripper’s forgotten victims
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Huddersfield researcher traces Jack the Ripper’s forgotten victims

August 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
UNIVERSITY of Huddersfield researcher Charlotte Mallinson is turning Ripperology on its head....
£1.5 million aid for historic buildings
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£1.5 million aid for historic buildings

August 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
More than £1.5 million has been awarded to help repair seven historic buildings across Scotland as part of Historic Scotland’s Building Repairs Grants...
Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage
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Space-age technologies aim to uncover Britain’s heritage

August 12th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A team from the University of Leicester is to investigate the potential use of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) technology to advance understanding of our...
Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques
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Western Wall Wearing Away? Discovery of Extreme Erosion Process Could Guide New Preservation Techniques

August 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem investigated erosion in the different types of limestone in the Western Wall located at the foot of Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. Stones comprised of large crystals were almost...
The ignored women of World War I
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The ignored women of World War I

August 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A study has awoken a silenced part of the First World War: the role of the war’s women. Researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Castilla-La Mancha consulted specialised sources on the women...
Queen of the Desert tapestries
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Queen of the Desert tapestries

July 31st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
She was a trailblazer, a spy, diplomat and archaeologist from the North East who travelled extensively across her beloved Arabia and helped to create a...
SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR
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SEKHEMKA IS LIKE GOLLUM’S “PRECIOUS” SAY CRITICS AS CHRISTIE’S CONFIRM SALE OF STATUE TO PRIVATE COLLECTOR

July 23rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Auctioneer Christie's, which sold the unique statue of the Egyptian Scribe Sekhemka for the World Record Price of £15.76 million, on 10 July, today confirmed that the buyer of the statue, which had been on public display for...
Ruination, Regeneration and Re-use: The Lister Drive Carnegie Library
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Ruination, Regeneration and Re-use: The Lister Drive Carnegie Library

July 18th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Lister Steps, a childcare charity in Liverpool, have secured initial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund to regenerate the Grade II listed former West Derby Carnegie Library on Lister Drive in Tuebrook,...
The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue
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The curse of Sekjemka strikes Northampton as Alan Moore condemns £15 million sale of statue

July 11th, 2014 | by Andy Brockman
As Christie's sell the statue of Sekhemka for £15.7 million, world famous graphic novelist Alan Moore torpedoes a key Government culture policy, the International Council of Museums condemns Northampton's sale of the statue and...
Sale of Sekhemka statue at Christie’s – ICOM CIPEG expresses concern
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Sale of Sekhemka statue at Christie’s – ICOM CIPEG expresses concern

July 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The International Council of Museums’ Committee for Egyptology (ICOM CIPEG) expresses concern about Northampton Borough Council’s selling of its Sekhemka statue at Christie’s...
Egyptian Government threatens legal action to stop the sale of Sekhemka
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Egyptian Government threatens legal action to stop the sale of Sekhemka

July 8th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Egyptian Antiquities Minister, Mamdouh El-Damati, has asked the Egyptian Embassy, located in London, to take legal action to prevent the sale of the Sekhemka Statue currently residing in Northampton...
World War One – Reflecting on the true poetic legacy of The Great War
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World War One – Reflecting on the true poetic legacy of The Great War

July 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
THE First World War still resonates for its horrors...and for its poetry. But do the works of writers such as Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke – widely taught in schools – reflect the true poetic legacy of...
Restoration begins on historic Severn Princess car ferry
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Restoration begins on historic Severn Princess car ferry

June 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Restoration begins on historic Severn Princess car...
First World War Head Nurse Honoured with a Blue Plaque
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First World War Head Nurse Honoured with a Blue Plaque

June 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Dame Maud McCarthy, the most senior nurse on the Western Front during the First World War, has been honoured with an English Heritage Blue Plaque at her former home in Chelsea,...
The occupation of Ninawa province by ISIS endangers Iraqs Heritage.
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The occupation of Ninawa province by ISIS endangers Iraqs Heritage.

June 26th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The occupation of Ninawa province by ISIS endangers Iraqs...
The CAER Heritage Challenge: can over 2,000 people explore over 2,000 years of history in just one month…?
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The CAER Heritage Challenge: can over 2,000 people explore over 2,000 years of history in just one month…?

June 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The CAER Heritage Challenge: can over 2,000 people explore over 2,000 years of history in just one...
New Book Details Scotland’s First World War Contribution and Heritage
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New Book Details Scotland’s First World War Contribution and Heritage

June 25th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New Book Details Scotland’s First World War Contribution and...
The Tibetan lama who wrote a world geography
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The Tibetan lama who wrote a world geography

June 15th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A study by Tibetan scholar Lobsang Yongdan revisits a long-ignored section of a historic text to reveal how Tibetans were engaging with western scientific knowledge two centuries...
First atlas of Inuit Arctic trails launched
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First atlas of Inuit Arctic trails launched

June 11th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
New digital resource brings together centuries of cultural knowledge for the first time, showing that networks of trails over snow and sea ice, seemingly unconnected to the untrained eye, in fact span a continent – and that the...
Scientist Uses Fossils to Confirm Historic Ohio Millstones Have French Origins
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Scientist Uses Fossils to Confirm Historic Ohio Millstones Have French Origins

June 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
A geologist studied fossils to confirm that stones used in 19th century Ohio grain mills originated from France....
Medieval manholes: the plumbers who led the way in utility maintenance
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Medieval manholes: the plumbers who led the way in utility maintenance

June 4th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Research by a University of Southampton professor has revealed the story of the medieval plumbers who maintained a complex water supply system, which was centuries ahead of its...
Vanishing da Vinci
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Vanishing da Vinci

June 3rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Studying a famous Leonardo self-portrait, a team of scientists has developed a new, nondestructive way to gauge degradation of ancient paper art and...
WWI – The Great War bred a moment of unity in British patriotism
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WWI – The Great War bred a moment of unity in British patriotism

June 2nd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
NIGHT after night, while guns thundered and soldiers died on the battlefields of France, the Yeoman Warders of the Tower of London dutifully carried out their ancient Ceremony of the Keys....
Medieval slave trade routes in Eastern Europe extended from Finland and the Baltic Countries to Central Asia
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Medieval slave trade routes in Eastern Europe extended from Finland and the Baltic Countries to Central Asia

May 28th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The routes of slave trade in Eastern Europe in the medieval and pre-modern period extended all the way to the Caspian Sea and Central Asia....
Amazing sites abandoned but not forgotten…
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Amazing sites abandoned but not forgotten…

May 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Today's buildings are tomorrows archaeology, but often when buildings are left to decay and ruin, it creates a snapshot in time. Often forgotten, a picture can capture that moment that otherwise is lost when developers move...
Culture Secretary appoints Commissioners to English Heritage
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Culture Secretary appoints Commissioners to English Heritage

May 19th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Culture Secretary Sajid Javid MP has appointed 7 new Commissioners with effect from 1 June...
Wall paintings recounting Jerusalem’s crusader history revealed
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Wall paintings recounting Jerusalem’s crusader history revealed

May 14th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Fascinating Wall Paintings Recounting Jerusalem’s Crusader History were Revealed while Organising the storerooms in Saint-Louis Hospital near the Old...
Out of Africa: modern humans left the home continent in at least two waves
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Out of Africa: modern humans left the home continent in at least two waves

May 1st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
It is well established that modern humans originated in Africa, before moving out to inhabit rest of the planet....
UCL Petrie Museum Launches 3D Online Object Library
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UCL Petrie Museum Launches 3D Online Object Library

April 30th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
CL’s Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, which holds one of the top specialist collections of ancient Egyptian artefacts in the world, has launched an interactive online 3D object library, allowing visitors to view the...
Man landing on Madeira could be 4 centuries prior to its colonization by the Portuguese
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Man landing on Madeira could be 4 centuries prior to its colonization by the Portuguese

April 29th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The dating of some mice fossilized bones found in Ponta de Sao Lourenco suggests that house mice landed on the island before...
Innocent landscape or coded message? Artists under suspicion in the First World War
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Innocent landscape or coded message? Artists under suspicion in the First World War

April 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
During the First World War artists were widely believed to be spies and, around much of the country, painting became...
Ireland’s Troy?
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Ireland’s Troy?

April 27th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
As Ireland marks the millennium of the Battle of Clontarf – portrayed as a heroic encounter between Irish and Vikings which defined the nation’s identity - new research argues that our main source for what happened may be...
Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be
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Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be

April 21st, 2014 | by archaeologynews
Chickens living just a few hundred years ago may have looked far different from the chickens of...
Transforming the rural fabric of the Carpathian Villages in Romania
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Transforming the rural fabric of the Carpathian Villages in Romania

April 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The villages of Romania, particularly those in Southern Saxon Transylvania, are a unique survival. These villages, the hay meadows and the forests which surround them are a last outpost of a central European Medieval landscape,...
Q&A: how archives make history
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Q&A: how archives make history

April 7th, 2014 | by archaeologynews
The early modern period (1500-1800) saw a surge in the keeping of records. A conference later this week (9-10 April 2014) at the British Academy will look at the origins of the archives that shape our understanding of history. We...
Ancient Egyptian weather report describes result of massive volcanic eruption
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Ancient Egyptian weather report describes result of massive volcanic eruption

April 3rd, 2014 | by archaeologynews
An inscription on a 3,500-year-old stone block from Egypt may be one of the world’s oldest weather reports—and could provide new evidence about the chronology of events in the ancient Middle...