This is an inscription from 1891 found in Dayu Cave. It reads: On May 24th, 17th year of the Emperor Guangxu period (June 30th, 1891 CE), Qing Dynasty, the local mayor, Huaizong Zhu led more than 200 people into the cave to get water. A fortuneteller named Zhenrong Ran prayed for rain during a ceremony. Credit : L. Tan
13 Aug 2015

Chinese cave ‘graffiti’ tells a 500-year story of climate change and impact on society

An international team of researchers, including scientists from the University of Cambridge, has discovered unique ‘graffiti’ on the walls of a cave in central China, which describes the effects drought had on the local population over the past 500 years.

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VOL1
10 Aug 2015

NASA simulation indicates ancient flood volcanoes could have altered climate

In June, 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines exploded, blasting millions of tons of ash and gas over 20 miles high – deep into the stratosphere, a stable layer of our atmosphere above most of the clouds and weather.

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Credit : Doug Knuth
07 Aug 2015

The Colossal Cave – Hang Son Doong

Drone footage captures the beauty of one of the world’s largest caves, containing dense jungles, immense cliffs and its own climate.

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dryas11
28 Jul 2015

Date of an anomalous cooling event most likely triggered by a cosmic impact

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

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concrete2
11 Jul 2015

Volcanic rocks resembling Roman concrete explain record uplift in Italian caldera

The discovery of a fiber-reinforced, concrete-like rock formed in the depths of a dormant supervolcano could help explain the unusual ground swelling that led to the evacuation of an Italian port city and inspire durable building materials in the future, Stanford scientists say.

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Credit : Hans Splinter
08 Jul 2015

Norwegian iron helped build Iron Age Europe

Two thousand years ago, Norway produced iron in significant quantities. Much of it was exported both southward and northward from Trøndelag in central Norway.

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lac2
30 Jun 2015

Earthquakes in western Solomon Islands have long history, study shows

Researchers have found that parts of the western Solomon Islands, a region thought to be free of large earthquakes until an 8.1 magnitude quake devastated the area in 2007, have a long history of big seismic events.

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springer
19 May 2015

“Eternal flames” of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists

Gas and oil seeps have been part of religious and cultural practices for thousands of years.

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cities1
01 May 2015

Geological foundations for smart cities: Comparing early Rome and Naples

Geological knowledge is essential for the sustainable development of a “smart city” — one that harmonizes with the geology of its territory.

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vol1
20 Mar 2015

Did a volcanic cataclysm 40,000 years ago trigger the final demise of the Neanderthals?

The Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) eruption in Italy 40,000 years ago was one of the largest volcanic cataclysms in Europe and injected a significant amount of sulfur-dioxide (SO2) into the stratosphere.

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dyna
22 Jan 2015

Death of a dynamo – a hard drive from space

Hidden magnetic messages contained within ancient meteorites are providing a unique window into the processes that shaped our solar system, and may give a sneak preview of the fate of the Earth’s core as it continues to freeze.

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can1
22 Jan 2015

Fossils survive volcanic eruption to tell us about the origin of the Canary Islands

The most recent eruption on the Canary Islands – at El Hierro in 2011 – produced spectacularly enigmatic white “floating rocks” that originated from the layers of oceanic sedimentary rock underneath the island.

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NUCLEAR1
15 Jan 2015

Did the Anthropocene begin with the nuclear age?

An international group of scientists has proposed a start date for the dawn of the Anthropocene – a new chapter in the Earth’s geological history.

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decan
19 Dec 2014

New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs’ extinction

A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago spewed enormous amounts of climate-altering gases into the atmosphere immediately before and during the extinction event that claimed Earth’s non-avian dinosaurs, according to new research from Princeton University.

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earth1
17 Dec 2014

Study Hints that Ancient Earth Made Its Own Water—Geologically

A new study is helping to answer a longstanding question that has recently moved to the forefront of earth science: Did our planet make its own water through geologic processes, or did water come to us via icy comets from the far reaches of the solar system?

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gwar
17 Dec 2014

Past global warming similar to today’s

The rate at which carbon emissions warmed Earth’s climate almost 56 million years ago resembles modern, human-caused global warming much more than previously believed, but involved two pulses of carbon to the atmosphere, University of Utah researchers and their colleagues found.

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des1
17 Dec 2014

North Atlantic signalled Ice Age thaw 1,000 years before it happened, reveals new research

The Atlantic Ocean at mid-depths may have given out early warning signals – 1,000 years in advance – that the last Ice Age was going to end, scientists report today in the journal Paleoceanography.

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global1
17 Dec 2014

Past global warming period echoes today’s

The rate at which carbon emissions warmed Earth’s climate almost 56 million years ago resembles modern, human-caused global warming much more than previously believed, but involved two pulses of carbon to the atmosphere, researchers have found.

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mineral
14 Dec 2014

Earth’s most abundant mineral finally has a name

An ancient meteorite and high-energy X-rays have helped scientists conclude a half century of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth.

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valley1
23 Nov 2014

Caltech geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas.

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drill
17 Nov 2014

Climate capers of the past 600,000 years

If you want to see into the future, you have to understand the past. An international consortium of researchers under the auspices of the University of Bonn has drilled deposits on the bed of Lake Van (Eastern Turkey) which provide unique insights into the last 600,000 years.

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earth
16 Nov 2014

Life Originated in the Earth’s Crust

This at least is what the geologist Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schreiber and the physico-chemist Prof. Dr. Christian Mayer of the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany are convinced of.

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