Photo courtesy of Fred Spoor of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
03 Jul 2015

Ancient monkey brain revealed

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature’s tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.

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Credit: Giant Screen Films © 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC
02 Jul 2015

First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt to life in the arctic.

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smell1
02 Jul 2015

Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men

A group of scientists led by Dr Kara Hoover of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and including Professor Matthew Cobb of The University of Manchester, has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct human relative would have been able to smell.

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01 Jul 2015

Dagger-like Canines of Saber-toothed Cats Took Years to Grow

New research shows that the fearsome teeth of the saber-toothed cat Smilodon fatalis fully emerged at a later age than those of modern big cats, but grew at a rate about double that of their living relatives.

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01 Jul 2015

Injured service personnel to help uncover secrets of premier Roman site on Hadrian’s Wall

The annual excavations at the Roman fort of Vindolanda in Northumberland are starting this year with the help of some very special volunteers.

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bovid1
01 Jul 2015

New study shows South Africans using milk-based paint 49,000 years ago

An international research team led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa has discovered a milk-and ochre-based paint dating to 49,000 years ago that inhabitants may have used to adorn themselves with or to decorate stone or wooden slabs.

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triassic1
30 Jun 2015

Big dinosaurs steered clear of the tropics

For more than 30 million years after dinosaurs first appeared, they remained inexplicably rare near the equator, where only a few small-bodied meat-eating dinosaurs made a living.

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Collinsium ciliosum, a Collins’ monster-type lobopodian from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba biota of China Credit: Jie Yang
30 Jun 2015

Spiky monsters: new species of ‘super-armoured’ worm discovered

A newly-identified species of spike-covered worm with legs, which lived 500 million years ago, was one of the first animals on Earth to develop armour for protection.

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crater
30 Jun 2015

Researchers calculate amount of undiscovered meteorite impact sites on Earth’s surface

The geologists Prof. Dr. Stefan Hergarten and Prof. Dr. Thomas Kenkmann from the Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of Freiburg have published the world’s first study on the question of how many meteorite craters there should be on the Earth’s surface.

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lac2
30 Jun 2015

Earthquakes in western Solomon Islands have long history, study shows

Researchers have found that parts of the western Solomon Islands, a region thought to be free of large earthquakes until an 8.1 magnitude quake devastated the area in 2007, have a long history of big seismic events.

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natural1
29 Jun 2015

Extreme makeover: Mankind’s unprecedented transformation of Earth

Human beings are pushing the planet in an entirely new direction with revolutionary implications for its life, a new study by researchers at the University of Leicester has suggested.

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dino1
29 Jun 2015

New Sesotho-named dinosaur from South Africa

South African and Argentinian palaeontologists have discovered a new 200 million year old dinosaur from South Africa, and named it Sefapanosaurus, from the Sesotho word “sefapano”.

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new1
29 Jun 2015

Research shows how Spanish colonists changed life in the Middle Rio Grande Valley

Spanish settlement of the Middle Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico changed the way people lived, but a new paper in the journal “The Holocene” by UNM Assistant Professor of Anthropology Emily Jones, suggests the change did not come quickly.

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trade
29 Jun 2015

Tracking the fortunes of the UK antiques trade online

A new online, interactive map has been launched which tracks the development and history of the UK antiques trade during the 20th century.

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