Image Credit : Google Earth
30 Jul 2015

Legal expert makes fact-finding visit to threatened hillfort

A specialist planning lawyer has met with campaigners to discuss the prospect of legal action against development affecting the setting of Old Oswestry hillfort. The meeting comes as Shropshire’s local plan, known as SAMDev, nears the end of its examination by Inspector Claire Sherratt. The plan includes a large housing

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FISH1
30 Jul 2015

New study exposes negative effects of climate change on Antarctic fish

Scientists at University of California Davis and San Francisco State University have discovered that the combination of elevated levels of carbon dioxide and an increase in ocean water temperature has a significant impact on survival and development of the Antarctic dragonfish (Gymnodraco acuticeps).

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fort1
29 Jul 2015

What is the top Roman fort to visit in Britain?

What is the top Roman fort to visit in Britain? Place your vote today!

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Credit : University of Reading
28 Jul 2015

Skeleton Of Bronze Age Adolescent Discovered Near Stonehenge

A rare skeleton of a Bronze Age child has been found by University of Reading archaeologists excavating Wilsford Henge in the Vale of Pewsey, Wiltshire.

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Keynsham Cemetery, which is built over the Roman Villa. Credit : WikiPedia
28 Jul 2015

Archaeological Investigation in Keynsham Cemetery

In 1877 the first vestiges of a large Roman building was identified during the construction of the mortuary chapels in the newly planned Durley Hill cemetery at Keynsham.

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Credit : Donald E. Hurlbert / Smithsonian Institution
28 Jul 2015

Smithsonian and Jamestown Rediscovery Partner to Reveal Identities of Four Lost Leaders of Jamestown

A team of scientists from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation at Historic Jamestowne announced the identities of four men buried within Jamestown’s historic 1608 church, the location of Pocahontas’ marriage to John Rolfe.

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sek1
28 Jul 2015

Last Gasp to Save Sekhemka

The Save the Sekhemka campaign has issued the following press release and statement, urging Prime Minister David Cameron to intervene.

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algae1
28 Jul 2015

Plant light sensors came from ancient algae

The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study from Duke University.

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CREDIT: PAINTING BY DANIELLE DUFAULT
28 Jul 2015

Unique tooth structure allowed predatory dinosaurs to efficiently crunch flesh and bone

The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM).

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Image by Manuel Will
28 Jul 2015

Cave that carries evidence of humanity’s first cultural exploits is under threat

Sibudu, a rock shelter above the uThongathi River in KwaZulu-Natal, is one of South Africa’s most important archaeological sites. Its recent nomination for World Heritage status demonstrates that it is of universal value, with heritage that belongs to all humanity.

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stonea1
28 Jul 2015

Loughborough scientists’ new chemical blueprint could be the answer to tackling stone theft

Scientists at Loughborough University hope their early trials of a new chemical blueprint technique could assist a crackdown on stone theft.

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dryas11
28 Jul 2015

Date of an anomalous cooling event most likely triggered by a cosmic impact

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

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moon1
27 Jul 2015

Technique may reveal the age of moon rocks during spaceflight

Researchers are developing instruments and methods for measuring the ages of rocks encountered during space missions to the Moon or other planets.

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Image courtesy of NASA, ESA, and Roberto Colombari
27 Jul 2015

Dust pillars of destruction reveal impact of cosmic wind on galaxy evolution

Astronomers have long known that powerful cosmic winds can sometimes blow through galaxies, sweeping out interstellar material and stopping future star formation. Now they have a clearer snapshot of how it happens. A Yale University analysis of one such event in a nearby galaxy provides an unprecedented look at the

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