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The Great Wall of Gorgan

The Great Wall of Gorgan, also called the "The Red Snake" or “Alexander's Barrier” is the second-longest defensive wall (after the Great Wall of China), which ran for 121 miles from a narrowing between the Caspian Sea north of Gonbade Kavous (ancient Gorgan, or Jorjan in Arabic) and the Pishkamar mountains of north-eastern Iran.

Aelia Capitolina – Roman Jerusalem

Aelia Capitolina was a Roman colony, constructed after the siege of 70 AD during the First Jewish-Roman War, when the city of Jerusalem and the Second Temple on Temple Mount was destroyed.

Wild Birds as Offerings to the Egyptian Gods

Millions of ibis and birds of prey mummies, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley.

Karahundj – The Ancient Speaking Stones

Karahundj, also called Carahunge and Zorats Karer is an ancient stone complex, constructed on a mountain plateau in the Syunik Province of Armenia.

Palaeontologists Establish Spinosaurus Was Real Life ‘River Monster’

A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.

Archaeology Uncovers Infectious Disease Spread – 4000 Years Ago

New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

Buhen – The Sunken Egyptian Fortress

Buhen was an ancient Egyptian settlement and fortress, located on the West bank of the Nile in present-day Sudan.

The Roman Empire Strikes Back

The accepted date for the collapse of the Western Roman Empire was approximately 476 CE, when the last true Roman Emperor Romulus was overthrown by Odoacer, the Germanic leader who became the first Barbarian to rule Rome.

The Secret Hellfire Club and the Hellfire Caves

The Hellfire Club was an exclusive membership-based organisation for high-society rakes, that was first founded in London in 1718, by Philip, Duke of Wharton, and several of society's elites.

Port Royal – The Sodom of the New World

Port Royal, originally named Cagway was an English harbour town and base of operations for buccaneers and privateers (pirates) until the great earthquake of 1692.

ARCHAEOLOGY

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ANTHROPOLOGY

15,000 year old ear infections discovered in burials from the Levant

A study by Tel Aviv University has discovered evidence of ear infections in human remains, by studying the skulls from inhabitants of the Levant around 15,000 years ago.

Injuries from medieval arrows just as horrific as gunshot wounds

Bones exhumed from a Dominican Friary in Exeter has revealed that arrows fired from a longbow caused injuries as deadly as modern-day gunshot wounds.

Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition

The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.

PALAEO ANTHROPOLOGY

PALAEONTOLOGY

Palaeontologists Establish Spinosaurus Was Real Life ‘River Monster’

A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.

The Oldest Known Sperm Cells

In another fascinating snapshot from deep time, an international team of paleontologists has reported the discovery of specimens of a minuscule crustacean that dates...

Extinct Sea Scorpions Could Breathe Out of Water

Scientists have long debated the respiratory workings of sea scorpions, but a new discovery by a West Virginia University geologist concludes that these largely aquatic extinct arthropods breathed air on land.
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SPACE & PLANETARY

Venus’ Ancient Layered, Folded Rocks Point to Volcanic Origin

An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history.

Meteorite Strikes May Create Unexpected Form of Silica

When a meteorite hurtles through the atmosphere and crashes to Earth, how does its violent impact alter the minerals found at the landing site?

Spinning Black Hole Powers Jet by Magnetic Flux

Black holes are at the center of almost all galaxies that have been studied so far. They have an unimaginably large mass and therefore attract matter, gas and even light.

GEOLOGY

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NATURAL HISTORY

More Than 90% of Protected Areas Are Disconnected

Ongoing land clearing for agriculture, mining and urbanisation is isolating and disconnecting Earth's protected natural areas from each other, a new study shows.

Shipwreck Harbors a Rich Spatially Structured Microbial Community

Shipwrecks act as artificial reefs and provide a substrate and nutrients for a great diversity of microorganisms, which can contribute to either the deterioration or preservation of the ship.

Searching the Ancient Depths of a Reptilian Genome Yields Insight into all Vertebrates

Scientists searching the most ancient corners of the genome of a reptile native to New Zealand found patterns that help explain how the genomes of all vertebrates took shape, according to a recently published study.

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The Lost Palace of Henry The VIII

A small village in Kent might now be the location for a building that would be looked upon as the jewel of Tudor design.

300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting

Homo heidelbergensis used wooden weapons to hunt waterbirds and horses.

Unravelling the mysteries of the Mayans

Beneath the tropical rainforests of Guatemala lies what remains of ‘one of the foremost archaeological sites in the world’ (Sharer & Traxer, 1946). Its modern name is Tikal, but when it was one of the most powerful kingdoms of the ancient Maya, it was known as Yax Mutul meaning "First Mutal".

Medicinal and Ritualistic Uses for Chocolate in Mesoamerica

Chocolate finds its way onto even the most simplistic dessert menus today to satisfy the sweetest sweet-tooth. In ancient Mesoamerica, chocolate was deemed a specialty food, achieving a sacred status.

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HeritageDaily is a dedicated, independent publisher of the latest research and discoveries from across the academic community. First launched as a small blog in 2011, the platform has grown into a general science publisher numbering hundreds of thousands of visitors a month, with a focus on archaeology, anthropology, palaeoanthropology and palaeontology. HeritageDaily is independent of outside interests or political and commercial pressures that could undermine editorial integrity. We pride ourselves in remaining a factual pseudo-free platform and a valued resource to the academic community.