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Ancient DNA reveals new insights into prehistoric Log Coffin culture

The Log Coffin culture emerged during the Iron Age in the highlands of Pang Mapha, northwestern Thailand.

Study reveals new genetics insights into inhabitants of Teōtīhuacān

A new genetic study has used the latest DNA sequencing techniques to reveal the entire mitochondrial genome sequences of the ancient Teōtīhuacāns.

Genetic analysis of baboons provides evidence that ancient Punt and Adulis were the same place

In Ancient Egypt, the hamadryas baboon was one of the animals that represented Thoth, the god of the Moon, wisdom, knowledge, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art and judgment.

New study suggests that prehistoric women were hunters too

According to a study published in Scientific American and the journal American Anthropologist, women were also hunters during the palaeolithic period.

Genome study reveals that Iceman Ötzi had dark skin and male pattern baldness

Ötzi, also known as the Iceman, is a naturally mummified human who lived between 3350 and 3105 BC.

Existence of a prehistoric settlement in the south of Álava is confirmed

The magnetic survey carried out, between the end of September and the start of October, in the area “Los Cascajos” (Tobera, Berantevilla), directed by Andoni Tarriño, a geologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has confirmed the existence of a Neolithic-Chalcolithic settlement in the south of Álava, one of the few settlements of this chronology found to date in the País Vasco.

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th centuries) and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death.

First glimpse at what ancient Denisovans may have looked like, using DNA methylation data

If you could travel back in time 100,000 years, you'd find yourself living among multiple groups of humans, including anatomically modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans.

Scotland’s genetic landscape echoes Dark Age populations

The DNA of Scottish people still contains signs of the country's ancient kingdoms, with many apparently living in the same areas as their ancestors did more than a millennium ago, a study shows.

Genes reveal kinship between 3 victims of Mongol army in 1238 massacre

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Archaeology have used DNA testing to prove close genetic kinship between three individuals buried in a mass grave following the capture of the Russian city Yaroslavl by Batu Khan's Mongol army in 1238.

Clues to early social structures may be found in ancient extraordinary graves

Elaborate burial sites can provide insight to the development of socio-political hierarchies in early human communities, according to a study released by an international team of archaeologists, anthropologists and neuroscientists of the Ba'ja Neolithic Project.

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys.

How mammals’ brains evolved to distinguish odors is nothing to sniff at

The world is filled with millions upon millions of distinct smells, but how mammals' brains evolved to tell them apart is something of a mystery.

Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot

Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.

Ancient DNA sheds light on the origins of the Biblical Philistines

Excavation of the Philistine Cemetery at Ashkelon Credit : Melissa Aja. Courtesy Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon

Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization’s decline

Cambodia’s famous temple of Angkor Wat is one of the world’s largest religious monuments, visited by over 2 million tourists each year.

Details of first historically recorded plague pandemic revealed by ancient genomes

An international team of researchers has analyzed human remains from 21 archaeological sites to learn more about the impact and evolution of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis during the first plague pandemic (541-750 AD).

Ancient feces reveal parasites in 8,000-year-old village of Çatalhöyük

New research published today in the journal Antiquity reveals that ancient faeces from the prehistoric village of Çatalhöyük have provided the earliest archaeological evidence for intestinal parasite infection in the mainland Near East.

Palaeolithic diet had no social divisions in food consumption

Biochemical analysis of human remains has become a key feature in our understanding of past peoples. Ancient DNA and Stable Isotope Analysis are now considered primary sources of information in the study of the geographic mobility of populations, their genetic affinities, and their diet.

Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA

The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch.

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